Course Registration

Upcoming Courses

Upcoming Courses

Open Courses

Spring 2020
Christie Kerr
Thursdays
1 PM - 4 PM
Jan 23 to Apr 9

Please Note: The class session originally scheduled for March 19th has been moved to March 12th (during the UA Spring Break) due to a conflict in the Professor's schedule. The dates listed above are correct and there will be NO CLASS on March 19th.

Come explore the history and significance of American musical theater dance. Dance, as an extended expression of language, exemplifies the collaboration between choreographers and writers. Musical theater dance has evolved through the...

Spring 2020
Bryan Carter
Mondays
9 AM - 11 AM
Jan 27 to Apr 6

African American literature has engaged consistently with the relationship between being black and being American. W. E. B. DuBois asked if that was even possible. Many writers and artists believed that control of representations of black Americans through art would lead to greater representation in political and social spheres. This course will examine some of the major debates and central texts of African American literature. The central theme of the course is the relationship between race, representation, and identity. We will examine the social construction of 20th-century African...

Spring 2020
Bella Vivante
Tuesdays
9 AM - 12 PM
Jan 28 to Apr 7

Homer’s sublime epics, Iliad and Odyssey, fire the imagination. We’ll explore how these stories develop from an ancient prequel to modern sequels. Homer’s poetic tradition harkens back to the Mesopotamian Epic of Gilgamesh: the part-divine conflicted hero who wrestles with his destiny. Homer’s poems then sparked new masterpieces: Virgil’s Aeneid reweaves Homer’s tales into the story of Rome’s founding. Innovative modern re-visionings abound. We’ll consider three: H.D.’s epic poem Helen in Egypt expands Helen’s ancient myths to explore women’s identity and...

Spring 2020
David Byrne
Thursdays
10 AM - 12 PM
Jan 30 to Apr 9

Please Note: This course will be held in Oro Valley at the Western National Parks Association (12880 N Vistoso Village Dr).

The relationship between humans and insects can be antagonistic. Only about 6% of people said that they enjoyed having insects in their yards. But they fail to see how these animals often provide useful services, for example, recycling of organic waste, producing valuable things like silk, honey, and natural dyes, and providing invaluable nutrition to the majority of the human population. A...

Spring 2020
Peter Medine
Fridays
9 AM - 12 PM
Jan 31 to Apr 10

The Ring cycle is Wagner's triumphant realization of the ideal he called the “total art work,” combining music and drama with poetry, dance, painting, and even architecture. But it's not just formal spectacle. The plot extends from the beginning of creation to the apocalyptic end of the world and centers on Wotan's effort to secure the reign of the gods forever. Ultimately, he fails, and from this perspective, the Ring is tragic. But the heroic commitment of Wotan's daughter Brunhilde to her beloved Siegfried at the conclusion affirms the possibility of redemption. The...

Spring 2020
Pearce Paul Creasman
Thursdays
9 AM - 12 PM
Feb 27 to Apr 2

This course will survey the fundamentals of ancient Egyptian religion from the Predynastic period (ca. 4000 BC) to the end of the New Kingdom (ca. 1000 BC). Material will be covered both as an overview of how things unfolded over the various periods as well as how religion was practiced at key moments in Egyptian history. This course offers an examination of the intellectual thought and religious life of ancient Egypt, with a particular focus on such major deities as Osiris, Ra, and Amun, as well as the religious centers and myths.

Registration Opens Online: Monday, November 25,...

Spring 2020
Mary Voyatzis
Wednesdays
1 PM - 3 PM
Mar 18 to Apr 8

Since 2004 the University of Arizona has been excavating at the sanctuary of Zeus on Mt. Lykaion, known as the “Birthplace of Zeus.” High in the Arcadian mountains of Greece, it has yielded remarkable discoveries over the last 15 years. Human activity at its ash altar began in the Neolithic period (4th millennium B.C.) and continued into the Hellenistic period (about 200 B.C.). An important Mycenaean shrine also sat at the southern peak of the mountain around 1500 B.C., as well as a Sanctuary of Pan and many administrative and athletic structures. This course presents the latest exciting...

Spring 2020
David Cuillier
Wednesdays
6 PM - 8 PM
Mar 18 to Apr 8

PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS AN EVENING COURSE.

Never before has the nature of news changed so quickly and dramatically than now, driven by a crumbling economic model, “#FakeNews” attacks from government leaders, and declining credibility and public support. This seminar examines the history of news, key principles of journalism that distinguish news from other forms of communications, and the current day-to-day practice of news. It also explores the effects of media on individuals, strategies for becoming a more discerning news consumer, forces that threaten to undermine an independent...

Closed Courses

Spring 2020

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Don Traut
Mondays
1 PM - 3 PM
Jan 27 to Apr 13

Sorry! This course has sold out. Click here to join the course waitlist

Music from Haydn and Mozart to Beethoven and Brahms forms a canon of works held dear by performers and concert-goers alike. While each of these composers has his own distinct style, structurally their music derives from a set of principles known as common-practice tonality (CPT). This course seeks to familiarize participants with the concepts and terminology central...

Spring 2020

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Jiang Wu
Tuesdays
1 PM - 3 PM
Jan 28 to Apr 7

Sorry! This course has sold out. Click here to join the course waitlist

How did Buddhism change world civilization? This is a puzzling question for many people interested in philosophy, spirituality, and practice. As a major religious tradition, Buddhism deserves our attention because of its increasingly strong presence in the West and its power to shape our culture. This course is designed to introduce you to Buddhist core beliefs, meditative...

Spring 2020

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E. Charles Adams
Wednesdays
1 PM - 3 PM
Jan 29 to Feb 26

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Many of us are familiar with and may have even visited the seemingly mystical places in the Four Corners of the U.S. Southwest on the Colorado Plateau, including Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, and many more. These were the long-ago homes of people we know as Pueblo, who began farming in the region 4,000 years ago. Their descendants – the Hopi, Zuni, Acoma, and Rio...

Spring 2020

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Greg Sakall
Wednesdays
6 PM - 8 PM
Jan 29 to Mar 4

Please Note: This is an evening course.

Sorry! This course has sold out. Click here to join the course waitlist

Alexander Hamilton wrote that the federal courts “will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution; because it will be least in a capacity to annoy or injure them” (Federalist No. 78). However, it seems the United States Supreme Court occupies an increasingly central role in resolving our...

Spring 2020

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J. Pat Willerton
Wednesdays
10 AM - 12 PM
Jan 29 to Feb 19

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This course explores the nuances and key features of the Russian cultural-societal-historical experience often called “the Russian Soul.” Caught between East and West, Asia and Europe, and experiencing its own unique socioeconomic-political developmental experience, Russia continues on its one-of-a-kind historical odyssey that merits our careful attention. This four-week tour...