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Upcoming Courses

Upcoming Courses

Open Courses

Main Campus

Spring 2023
Robert Glennon
Friday
1 PM - 2 PM
Jan 13
Lecture Event - Attend In Person OR Online Population growth and climate change present an immense challenge: How will we feed the Earth’s population, estimated to be 10+ billion by 2050?  Farmers currently use 80 percent of available water, but cities and industry need more water.  A profound challenge faces us:  How do we keep rural agricultural communities vibrant so they can produce food for the world, and satisfy the demand of municipal and industrial users for more water? Technological developments promise another green revolution, but at a great cost.  Pioneering food and beverage...
Spring 2023
Richard Poss
Mondays
2 PM – 4 PM
Jan 30 to Apr 10
Attend In Person OR Online This seminar examines the intersection of astronomy and the arts by studying astronomical ideas as they occur in works of art, literature, and music. Participants will experience a diverse assortment of cultural works from different periods, all portraying and responding to astronomical ideas. From frescoes in ancient Rome to contemporary space paintings, we will examine the artifacts for what they reveal about both the poetic and the scientific worlds. In this process, we will become acquainted with the details of the astronomical content, which is the context for...
Spring 2023
Albrecht Classen
Mondays
10 AM – 12 PM
Jan 30 to Apr 10
Attend In Person OR Online Many people know Boccaccio's Decameron and are aware of the profound messages contained in this famous collection of tales. Contemporary German poets also created remarkable verse narratives that make us laugh, cry, wonder, ponder, and reflect upon the meaning of life. Love is the basic glue that holds all people together, however, sometimes that glue no longer works, and problems emerge. Human folly, frailty and shortcomings are revealed - thus, through literary entertainment, wisdom enters the picture. When we laugh about foolish or witty lovers, we gaze...
Spring 2023
Karl Flessa
Tuesdays
1 PM – 3 PM
Jan 31 to Feb 28
Attend In Person OR Online The Colorado River starts in a high mountain meadow, flows through forests and canyons, and past tribal nations. The river now generates power and is diverted to farms and cities -- and no longer reaches the sea. How did we get here? Where are we going? One hundred years since the signing of the Colorado River Compact, 22 years into a mega-drought, and four years away from new rules on sharing the waters, it is time to take a close look at the Colorado River. In this course, we will explore various topics from the human and geologic history of the Colorado River,...
Spring 2023
Chris Impey
Tuesdays
10 AM – 12 PM
Jan 31 to Feb 28
Attend In Person OR Online Astronomy has seen tremendous progress in the past century. Large telescopes on the ground and in space now give us views of the universe across the electromagnetic spectrum. Powerful computers can handle exponentially increasing volumes of data and allow simulations of remote objects and extreme astrophysics. We know how stars work, how many galaxies there are, and how to find exoplanets. Yet there is much we don’t know and areas where our physical understanding is weak. This course is a report from the frontiers of astronomy and physics research on five aspects of...
Spring 2023
Peter Medine
Wednesdays
1 PM – 3 PM
Feb 1 to Apr 12
Attend In Person OR Online This seminar will explore the enduring relevance of Shakespeare's drama, extending from love to politics, to human fate. To mark the 400th anniversary of the First Folio, we shall study six of the plays in their genres: comedy, history, and tragedy. We shall then focus on the plays' plots, in which comedy proceeds from relative disorder to order and tragedy from relative order to disorder. Originating in the 16th century, the history play is distinguished by subject but depends on plots that conform to comic and tragic patterns. Mindful that Shakespeare was a...
Spring 2023
Bruce Chamberlain
Wednesdays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Feb 1 to Feb 22
Attend In Person OR Online Haydn’s Creation is considered one of his greatest achievements and is undoubtedly a masterwork of the choral/orchestral oratorio tradition. The original English libretto is shrouded in mystery and Haydn needed it translated into German for his purposes. Therefore, modern performances of this beautiful music must contend with either using Haydn’s German libretto, since the original English libretto does not work so well with Haydn’s music, or using one of now several newly formulated English translations/versions. Course participants will be “enlightened”...
Spring 2023
Andres D. Onate
Thursdays
10 AM – 12 PM
Feb 2 to Apr 13
Attend In Person OR Online There is no more critical issue facing the U.S. and its allies in 2022 than the U.S. relationship with China. How this relationship evolves is so vital to America's wellbeing that it is fair to say it eclipses or goes hand-in-hand with other political, economic, and social issues of the day. In and of itself, the future of Taiwan is a critical issue polarizing the world and, worse, has the potential to bring the U.S. and its allies into conflict with China. We will follow official U.S.-China relations dating back to 1972, when President Nixon visited China and...
Spring 2023
David Gibbs
Fridays
10 AM – 12 PM
Feb 3 to Apr 14
Attend In Person OR Online The decade of the 1970s represented a turning point in US politics, which shifted in a rightward direction toward free market economics at the domestic level, combined with more militaristic and interventionist policies overseas. The course explores the origins of this political shift, with a special emphasis on the role of elite business interests in orchestrating the project. We will look at how the shift played out in such diverse areas as economic policy, cultural politics, and foreign/military policy. The course will also explore how the rightward shift in US...
Spring 2023
Tim Swindle
Friday
7 PM - 8:30 PM (AZ Time)
Mar 10
Lecture Event - Attend In Person OR Online Since the discovery that the impact of an asteroid was the probably cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs, many have wondered whether the same might happen to humanity. This has led to scientific investigation, in which the University of Arizona is at the heart, having discovered nearly half the asteroids known to mankind at present. It has also led to spacecraft missions to understand small asteroids better and to test mitigation strategies, and to international conferences devoted to understanding how to respond to the problem. Finally, it has...
Spring 2023
Juan R. Garcia
Tuesdays
10 AM – 12 PM
Mar 14 to Apr 11
Attend In Person OR Online In this course, we will cover the causes of WWI and the role of the United States in the conflict. The course will begin with the primary focus on the war itself. We will explore what was occurring on the U.S. home front. Next, we will spend some time covering the U.S. Military’s role during the war before we turn to the aftermath and consequences that the war caused on the U.S. Home Front. We will also spend some time exploring major events from 1918-1919, including the Pandemic of 1918, the battle over the Treaty of Paris both at home and abroad, the failure of...
Spring 2023
Judy Brown, J. Pat Willerton
Thursdays
1 PM – 4 PM
Mar 16 to Apr 20
NEW! HSP Deep Dive Seminar The purpose of this course is to analyze critically the traditional and often hidebound ways we think about democracies and other political systems. We do so by looking at the challenges confronting the Russian Federation and the United States of America. For engaging Russia, a good starting point is thinking about the notion of Russia as an “other” to the U.S., in the process trying to realistically tackle both Russian domestic politics and foreign policy (with a focus on the Russian-Ukrainian conflict). For engaging the United States, we operate through the lens...
Spring 2023
Denis Provencher
Tuesdays
1 PM – 3 PM
Mar 21 to Apr 18
Attend In Person OR Online We will explore the life and work of queer novelist Abdellah Taïa who has built his life and literary career between his homeland of Morocco and his adopted France. We study several of his works, including his feature-length film Salvation Army. We begin by examining his childhood, where he grew up in a poor, working-class family on the outskirts of Casablanca.  As a child, Abdellah developed a fascination for Europe after being exposed to films, books and music. In his adulthood, Taia moves to Europe to finish his education, build his literary career, and live “...
Spring 2023
Marie Darrieussecq
Wednesdays
9 AM - 11 AM
Mar 29 to Apr 17
Attend In Person OR Online Sometimes it is easy to start writing, but it is never easy to go on. When I was very young, I was a specialist in first chapters. Later in life, I often had in mind the beginning and the end of a novel, the head and tail, but the belly of it resisted me. Developing the story’s middle, all those character elements, events, twists and turns often seemed absurd or even annoying to me. In this course, I will share how to face this void at the center of every book and skirt around what we call in French la page blanche – the blank page. The course will focus on...