Past Courses

To see all courses currently available scroll to the bottom of this page.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2019. No class on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course will explore the culture, counterculture, and art of the long decade of the 1960s. Our focus will center on youthful artists in the United States, beginning with Abstract Expressionism and ending with Performance art and what critic Lucy Lippard called the “dematerialization of the art object.” Social history, semiotic analysis, literary and film theory, and art history will inform class discussions. Themes include the Cold War and Beat culture, the rise of Minimalism and Pop Art, psychedelic experience, the prominence of advertising and the marketing of “cool,” student movements, censorship, Rock music culture, the Vietnam War, and hippie communal spirituality. 

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24 - April 4, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This seminar examines Virgil’s Aeneid as well as the pivotal and turbulent context that led to its creation. The course begins with an introduction to the political turmoil that encompassed the fall of the Roman Republic and Octavian’s rise to power as Augustus Caesar, supreme ruler of the Roman Empire. It will then turn to explore the influence of Greece on the development of Roman culture and on Virgil’s development as a poet. Virgil’s objective in the Aeneid was to provide a mythic narrative to explain the Roman people as a continuation in Italy of the Trojans celebrated by Homer. The Aeneid was the culmination of Virgil’s literary career and this seminar will emphasize Virgil’s poetic invention of the idea of Rome, and the lasting influence of that idea in both Europe and the United States.

Required Reading:

Virgil. The Aeneid. Trans. Robert Fagles. Penguin Classics, 2008. ISBN-10: 0143105132.

Heaney, Seamus. Aeneid Book VI: A new Verse Translation. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2017.  ISBN-10: 0374537046.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24 - February 21, 2019.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Future Course

Please note that this course meets in Oro Valley!

Water is the most important resource associated with ecological and human well-being, economic productivity, and security. Stresses are placed on the Earth’s water resources by climate change, population growth, conflicts, and other social changes. Achieving a sustainable use of water may be the most critical issue of natural resource management now facing many societies. This course addresses the science and technology underlying sustainable water use. We will discuss water use within energy generation, domestic supplies, and agriculture while highlighting water use and modification along entire production and supply chains. Water use within agriculture, for example, accounts for more than 70% of the world’s freshwater use. We will also examine multi-disciplinary case studies that highlight specific challenges, successes, and failures in water use and management around the world today.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. January 17 - February 7, 2019.
Holsclaw Hall, Fred Fox School of Music
Future Course

Please note that this course meets in Holsclaw Hall in the Fred Fox School of Music.

Why is it that much classical music written after 1910 remains difficult for audiences? The answer lies partially in the splintering of compositional languages throughout the 20th century, languages that can leave listeners unnecessarily flummoxed and dissatisfied. In this class, Dr. Milbauer will lead—from the piano bench—a sweeping tour of compositional movements from the turn of the 20th century to the present, finding windows into understanding by linking newer composers with their better-known antecedents and by referencing visual arts, physics, literature, philosophy, dance, and history. After four weeks, students will be better equipped to derive meaning and beauty from this extraordinary repertoire, and will have a greater understanding of the principal “isms” of the last century: Impressionism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Serialism, Neo-Classicism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Minimalism, Aleatoricism, and Post-Modernism. This course assumes no prior study of music.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2019. No class on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

The Balkans has typically been described stereotypically and which countries belong in the Balkans today remains contentious. In this course, we will examine the Balkans from a variety of perspectives: the cultural-historical background of the Balkans as a geopolitical construct, as well as the ethnic, national, and religious identities as interpreted by the people themselves, governing entities, and outside observers. Documentary and narrative films by Balkan filmmakers will enhance our exploration of the various social, historical, and cultural factors that influence a group's conception of themselves and others. Literature, music, cuisine, and language will also be examined as means of constructing and expressing identity in this highly diverse multi-cultural and multi-lingual region.

Required films will be accessible on YouTube and Kanopy, a free video streaming service available through the Pima County Public Library. 

Required Reading:

Hupchick, Dennis and Harold Cox. The Palgrave Concise Historical Atlas of the Balkans. 1st edition. Palgrave Macmillan, 2001. ISBN-13: 978-0312239701. ISBN-10: 031223970X.

Acceptable alternative to Hupchick & Cox 2001:

Hupchik & Cox 2016. The Palgrave Concise Historical Atlas of Eastern Europe: Revised and Updated. 2nd edition. ISBN-13: 978-0312239855 ISBN-10: 0312239858. ISBN: 978-1137048172 (ebook) [This atlas may be less expensive and also available in Kindle format].

Wachtel, Andrew.  The Balkans in World History. 1st edition . Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0195338010. ISBN-10: 0195338014 (Kindle or Paperback).

Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 22 - April 2, 2019. No class on March 5.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course will focus on Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron, a collection of putatively “true” stories inspired by Boccaccio’s Decameron. Composed in the 1540s, the entertaining Heptaméron is puzzling on several counts. That the Queen of Navarre, sister of King Francis I and a woman known for her piety, would pen such racy tales—about adultery, trickery, clergy abuse, and murder—is surprising in and of itself. We will explore this conundrum throughout the course. In particular, we will examine realistic elements within the stories, which offer glimpses of everyday Renaissance life; the moral complexities and shifting perspectives that make the Heptaméron’s “meaning” elusive; the marginalized viewpoints of women and servants, which Marguerite uses as vehicles of revelation that contest the status quo; and the religious and sociopolitical implications of the narratives within the context of Reformation-era France.

Required Reading:

Any translation is acceptable. Here are suggestions:

Paperback:  De Navarre, Marguerite. The Heptameron. Trans. P.A. Chilton. London: Penguin, 1984. ISBN-13:  978-0140443554. 

Online: http://digital.library.upenn.edu/women/navarre/heptameron/heptameron.html (From Marguerite de Navarre, The Heptameron of Margaret, Queen of Navarre, trans. Walter K. Kelly [London: Published for the trade, 1867].

 

Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 28 - April 8, 2019. No class on March 4.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

To study film language is to explore how films use narrative structure, visual style and sound design. We will begin at the beginnings of film, from the 1890s through the 1910s feature, the European art film movements of the 1920s and the arrival of sound. With this grounding in camerawork, editing, sound, action, and motifs, we will turn to examine the theory and practice of stylistic devices that developed in the second half century of film history -- neo-realism, distanciation, and feminist film. Throughout the course we will screen films* that use film language in deliberate ways to engage the audience in reflection on humanity, social justice, and history. Filmmakers include Cheryl Dunye, R.W. Fassbinder, Warwick Thornton, Rene Clair, D.W. Griffith, Akira Kurosawa, Hiroshi Shimizu, Chris Marker, Pablo Larrain, and David Miller.

*All films are available through Kanopy.com, a free online streaming service.  To access this service, students need a Pima County Public Library card.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 28 - February 25, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

In this course, we will focus on learning to read three of Faulkner’s most celebrated novels: The Sound and the Fury (1929), Light in August (1932), and Absalom, Absalom! (1936). “Learning to read,” means learning to analyze, interpret, and enjoy. We will ask ourselves such questions as:  What do these texts contribute to our understanding of American Literature? What contributions have they made to the novel as a genre? How are we to tease out the meaning and deployment of time, history, race, and the south in these prodigious texts? We will engage the novels as close readers, pondering carefully and in depth the words on the page as well as the plot lines, characters, and cultural concerns expressed therein. First time readers and devout Faulkner fans are equally welcome!

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. March 11 - April 8, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

“No person ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he/she is not the same person.” If this is the human condition according to Heraclitus, what remains permanent in the midst of change? This course will explore the twin themes of permanence and change as they are expressed in William Wordsworth’s Intimations Ode and four American novels: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Nella Larsen’s Passing, and Philip Roth’s The Human Stain. We will consider the specific cultural context and key concerns of each text. Themes to be explored include childhood in the early 19th century for Wordsworth; the United States in the 1920s for Fitzgerald; the post WWI world that shapes Hemingway’s characters in Europe; the ambiguous nature of race and gender in the American scene for Larsen; and the American angst at the end of the Twentieth Century for Roth.

Required Reading:

Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. Scribner, 1995. ISBN-10: 0684801523. ISBN-13: 978-0684801520.

Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. Scribner, 1995. ISBN-10: 0684800713. ISBN-13: 978-0684800714.

Larsen, Nella. Passing. Penguin Classics, 1997. ISBN-10: 0141180250. ISBN-13: 978-0141180250.

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. ISBN-10: 0060838671. ISBN-13: 978-0060838676.

Roth, Philip. The Human Stain. Vintage International, 2001. ISBN-10: 0375726349. ISBN-13: 978-0375726347.

Professor
Tuition:
$ 235
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 18 - April 5, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Course Full

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the central conflict of the twentieth century. Our approach to the topic will be roughly chronological and will attempt to treat each of the major theaters and battles, themes, and ideas of the conflict. We will trace its origins in the aftermath of WWI, see the growth of fascism, the expansion of the Japanese Empire, and the rise of Hitler. In an effort to cover all the theaters of the war, both in Europe and in the Pacific, we will first examine the campaigns and battles in a conventional “military history” sense. In addition to this, we will consider the accelerated pace of technological advances, from sonar and radar to the proximity fuse and the atom bomb. Finally, we will follow innovations in media techniques used in the propaganda war on all sides and the creation of national mythologies through film and television.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SPRING BROCHURE HAS THE TIME LISTED INCORRECTLY. The class meets for three hours from 9 to noon.

 

Required Reading:

Keegan, John. The Second World War.  Penguin Books, 2005.  ISBN-10: 9780143035732.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Explore ancient Greek plays as dynamic examples of live theater and discover the often-spectacular performance aspects that rival opera, Busby Berkeley musicals or Cirque de Soleil. In this course, we will examine the role of the chorus and the choral odes, which form the musical framework for the plays and whose musical stylings are incredibly diverse and creative. We will encounter memorable characters presented in highly dramatic scenes that are performed to the audience’s delight, horror, and edification. Addressing significant issues of the day, ancient Greek drama continues to resonate today, proving their perpetual timeliness and emerging as dynamic, living entities with much to offer a contemporary audience. Basing the thematic interpretation on the performance aspects results in a rich, multi-textured appreciation of the plays. 

Required Reading:

Please note: You may use any translation of the assigned plays that you have or find ready access to in hard copy or online.

  1. Aeschylus. Oresteia. Translated by Peter Meineck. Hackett Publishing, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0872203907.
  2. ---. The Complete Aeschylus, vol. II: Persians and Other Plays. Translated by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2009.  ISBN-13: 978-0195373288.
  3. Sophocles. The Complete Sophocles, vol. I: The Theban Plays. Translated by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0195388800.
  4. Euripides. Women on the Edge: Four Plays by Euripides. Eds. Ruby Blondell et al. Routledge, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0415907743.
  5. Euripides. Bacchae. Translated by Paul Woodruff. Hackett Publishing, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0872203921.
  6. Aristophanes: The Complete Plays. Translated by Paul Roche. Penguin, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-045121409.

 

Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. February 28 - March 28, 2019. Please note that this course will meet during the UA spring break on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Course Full

This course will examine the sites that were most critical to the development of ancient Egyptian civilization and have yielded its most spectacular discoveries. Archaeological sites such as the Pyramids and Great Sphinx of Giza, the Valley of the Kings & King Tutankamun's tomb, and the treasures of Tanis will be explored and their significance in Egyptian history explained. The course will focus on the archaeological evidence for each site or clustered group of discoveries with an emphasis on the time between the Predynastic Period (ca 4500 BC) and the New Kingdom (ca 1000 BC).

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 15 - February 12, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Course Full

Most of the people in the world know something about the American West. Usually popular ideas about it come from the work of novelists, artists, performers, filmmakers and TV producers, who created a mythical time and place where self-reliant pioneers overcame physical hardship, dangerous Indians, and environmental challenges to populate the region. Reality suggests a different picture. Hundreds of thousands of homesteaders failed, the vast majority of would-be miners never struck it rich, and most pioneers never met hostile Indians. Yet, at the same time reality really did follow the script. For some people the West offered mineral wealth, a family farm or rich grazing land, personal adventure, or a chance to escape tiresome routines and start life over in a new place. This seminar will discuss both the realities and the myths most of us have about settling the American West.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

China’s rise may be the single most transformative event of the contemporary world. Many have called attention to the economic and political impact of China’s rise, but what of China’s cultural renaissance? What does it bode for the future? The reinvention of China’s cultural identity is being shaped in terms of its past, but which past is being held up as the model —Communism, Confucianism, Legalism? This course looks at current engagements with China’s past with an eye toward exploring the factors shaping China’s future. It introduces the traditional lenses of Chinese thought —Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, and Buddhism— and reflects on their potential relevance for contemporary China. In short, the course has two aims: to introduce key aspects of China’s traditional cultures and to look at ways in which these key aspects are contributing to contemporary debates in China over its future direction.

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2018. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

This course will explore how the political developments at the turn of the twentieth century shaped the culture of Vienna. The failure of liberalism after its brief period in power due to the economic crisis of the 1870s, the rise of anti-Semitic parties, and World War I caused vast cultural upheaval that may be seen in the period’s works of literature, music, art, architecture, philosophy of science, Zionism, and psychoanalysis. We will examine how writers, artists, and other cultural figures dealt with the devastation of World War I and the fall of the Habsburg Empire after centuries of rule. Finally, this course will trace how all of these aspects were prophetic of the worst catastrophes that the twentieth century would bring.

Required Reading:

1. Schorske, Carl. Fin-de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture. Vintage, 1980.  ISBN-10: 0394744780. ISBN-13: 978-0394744780.

2. Schnitzler, Arthur. Four Major Plays. Smith and Kraus Pub, 1999. ISBN-10: 1575251809. ISBN-13: 978-1575251806.

3. The Whole Difference: Selected Writings of Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Ed. J.D. McClatchy. Princeton University Press, 2008.  ISBN-10: 0691129096. ISBN-13: 978-0691129099.

4. Freud, Sigmund. The Interpretation of Dreams. Basic Books, 2010. ISBN-10: 0465019773. ISBN-13: 978-0465019779.

 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
Session 2 will be held in the afternoon from 2 - 4 PM.
Both sessions will contain the same class content and will be held on the same dates this Fall.

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is mounting that intellectual challenge, social engagement, and regular physical activity can have a profound positive impact on our lives as we age. Why? Because they influence the ongoing alterations, or “plasticity,” in our ever-changing brains. This course examines the recent revolution in our views of brain function that gives us a new way to grasp how our brains work.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Nov. 7, 14, 28, Dec. 5, and 12, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

This course explores the United States Supreme Court and its role in deciding fundamental social questions. After an introductory class on the Court itself, we will focus on landmark cases involving race in education, abortion, religious freedom, and wartime detention. Readings will include edited versions of the Court’s opinions. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the Court’s power, function, and role as part of the larger government, and appreciate whether and when we should accede to the Court’s interpretation of the Constitution.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
Session 2 will be held in the afternoon from 2 - 4 PM.
Both sessions will contain the same class content and will be held on the same dates this Fall.

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is mounting that intellectual challenge, social engagement, and regular physical activity can have a profound positive impact on our lives as we age. Why? Because they influence the ongoing alterations, or “plasticity,” in our ever-changing brains. This course examines the recent revolution in our views of brain function that gives us a new way to grasp how our brains work.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4, 18, Dec. 2, 9, and 16, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The city has been the motor of progress in modernity and the crucible of many of the social movements that have contested the darker underside of the modern. This seminar will explore how cities came to reside at the center of the modern project, how they have been transformed over time, and what those transformations might mean. It will also examine how the work of artists, most importantly film makers, react to the urban process, and how their creations contribute to understanding the complex dynamic that forms the culture and politics of cities.

The class will focus on a variety of cities as well as important films about them to show how the city passes from backdrop to protagonist of the changes in the urban process. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which the content and form of film reveal the authors’ views, and we will work through the techniques necessary to decipher the creative process. This will allow all of those in the class to hone their analytic skills as urbanists as well as film viewers.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Virginia Woolf famously said that Middlemarch is “one of the few English novels written for grown-up ­people.”  It is also frequently said to be the best nineteenth-century novel written in English and the most perfect example of classic British realism. Its capacious scope, depth of compassion, and careful attention to the details of human experience transcend its Victorian origins; it continues to attract ardent devotees almost 150 years after its publication. In this course we will examine the language of Middlemarch and nuances of form, plot, and character. We will explore George Eliot’s life and take a sustained interest in the historical context of the novel, including its relation to science, religion, political economy, and social history. The focus of the course will be on the pleasures of reading one of the great novels of all time and investigating materials that can enrich that experience.

Required Reading:

Eliot, George. Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life. Ed. Gregory Maertz. Broadview Editions, 2004. ISBN-13: 978-1551112336.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19, Dec. 3, and 10, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The tragicomedy genre, so prevalent in our day, has actually been evolving for many centuries. While one can take a primarily aesthetic approach to any genre--what makes comedy comedy?--here we will include a fuller consideration of history, stressing the social, political, and philosophical contexts of the particular plays.

How does a certain “age” or “culture” perceive tragicomedy? What are the roots of this standpoint, and how does it evolve across cultural and temporal barriers? How do interpretation and performance affect our understanding of the works today? How is it plays, on the page as well as performed, provide so many opportunities for critical thinking? Supplemental readings and viewings will complement the play reading list. Professional actors will present key scenes during many of the lectures.

Required Reading:
  1. Plautus. Amphitryon and Two Other Plays. Trans. & Ed. Lionel Casson. W.W. Norton & Co., 1971. ISBN: 0393006018. Please read this comedy before the first class.
  1. Shakespeare, William. All’s Well that Ends Well. Ed. Claire McEachern.  Penguin Classics, 2001. ISBN: 978-0140714609.
  1. Johnson, Ben. Volpone and Other Plays. Ed. Michael Jamieson. Penguin Classics, 2004.  ISBN: 978-0141441184.   
  1. deVega, Lope. Fuenteovejuna. Ed. Stanley Appelbaum. Dover Publications; Bilingual Edition, 2002. ISBN: 978-0486420929.
  1. De la Barca, Pedro Calderon. Life Is a Dream. Trans. Ed Fitzgerald. DoverThrift Editions, 2002. ISBN: 978-0486421247.
  1. Moliere. Tartuffe. Dover Thrift Editions, 2000. ISBN: 978-0486411170.
  1. Ibsen, Henrik. The Wild Duck. Dover Thrift Editions, 2000. ISBN: 978-0486411163.
  1. Chekhov, Anton. Three Sisters. Dover Thrift Editions, 1993. ISBN: 978-0486275444.
  1. Pirandello, Luigi. Six Characters in Search of an Author.  Dover Thrift Editions, 1997. ISBN: 978-0486299921.
  1. Ionesco, Eugene. The Bald Soprano and Other Plays. Trans. Donald M. Allen. Grove Press, 1982. ISBN: 978-0802130792.

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In the 1800s the newly created United States of America was seized by what was labeled “Manifest Destiny”--a deep-seated drive to expand from coast to coast. This drive encountered several obstacles, ranging from the challenges presented by geography and travel to the fact that large segments of land were already claimed by America’s indigenous people. The impulse toward a unified continent was also derailed by the Civil War and the division between the states. The military played a significant role in conquering the West and, obviously, in the Civil War. This course will explore how the actions of four nineteenth-century generals--Grenville Dodge, Joseph K. Barnes, Richard Henry Pratt, and Ely Parker--would help shape the face of modern Native America.

Required Reading:

No textbooks are required for this class. Readings will be made avaialbe on our password-protected website at http://course.hsp.arizona.edu by early July.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 2, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 20, Dec. 4, 11, and 18, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

One of the most popular and beloved novelists in the English language, Jane Austen wrote novels that have beguiled and challenged readers for two centuries.

For some, Austen is our beloved "Aunt Jane," chatting with us about tea parties, excursions in pony phaetons, and ill-advised epistolary relationships. For others, she is a subversive ironist whose piercing vision of human foibles offers us reflections relevant to our own lives and times.

How did this seventh child of a provincial clergyman, a single woman who lived an intensely domestic life, produce some of the greatest novels in the English language? What makes them great? We will examine and discuss Austen's complete works in this class. We will look at historical, literary historical, and cultural contexts of the works, paying particular attention to Austen's style and approach to the novel as a genre.

Required Reading:

Please note that you are free to use any edition that you may already own, including Kindle editions or large print editions. The following editions have been ordered through the UA bookstore:

Austen, Jane. Juvenilia. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009. ISBN: 1443801666.

 ---. Pride and  Prejudice. Dover Thrift Editions, 1995. ISBN: 0486284735. 

---. Mansfield Park. Dover Thrift Editions, 2001. ISBN: 0486415856. 

---. Northanger Abbey. Dover Thrift Editions, 2000. ISBN: 0486414124. 

---. Emma. Dover Thrift Editions, 1998. ISBN: 0486406482.  

---. Sense and Sensibility. Dover Thrift Editions, 1995. ISBN: 0486290492.                        

 ---. Persuasion. Dover Thrift Editions, 1997. ISBN: 0486295559. 

---. Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sanditon. Penguin Classics, 1975. ISBN: 0140431020.

 

Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2015. No class on November 23, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Faust is alive and well. His emanations appear in literature, art, music, film, and cyberspace. Not only Adam and Eve but also Faust ate of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. So he has excited the human imagination for centuries. But who was this mysterious alchemist or learned academician who dared transgress the borders of accepted knowledge and revel in the world of darkness that the Church condemned and warned against?

We will look for him on the Internet, in Marlowe’s Tragical History of Dr. Johann Faust, and in Gounod’s Faust opera, Liszt’s “Faust” symphony, and Wagner’s Faust overture. The main focus of the seminar is on those Fausts entrenched in German culture. Therefore, a significant part of the seminar is devoted to discussions of Goethe’s Faust. And we will look carefully at the novel Doctor Faust, Mann’s devastating criticism of the rise of Nazi Germany.

Required Reading:

Marlowe, Christopher. The Tragical History of Dr. Johann Faust. In: Doctor Faustus and Other Plays. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0199537068.

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang. Faust: Part One. Trans. David Luke. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0199536214.

Gounod, Charles. FaustGounod’s Faust.  Ed. Robert Lawrence. Literary Licensing, LLC, 2011. ISBN: 978-1258183981.

Mann, Thomas. Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkühn as Told by a Friend. Trans. John E. Woods. Vintage International, 1999. ISBN: 978-0375701160.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 29 - December 15, 2015. No class on November 10 and November 24, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course addresses the twentieth-century genocide that was the Holocaust, the attempted annihilation of European Jews and other designated racial and political opponents led by the Third Reich in Germany. We will review the horrific events of the Holocaust and explore the current scholarly understanding of this history: What does it mean to remember the Holocaust today?

The Holocaust continues to be relevant, and not only for surviving victims and perpetrators. We will consider how and why the Holocaust has been remembered in the United States and abroad, whether in museums and schools or popular culture and the Internet. We will also discuss in particular how visual evidence of atrocities has been circulated to provide testimony and promote popular awareness of the crime of genocide.

Required Reading:

Friedlander, Saul. Nazi Germany and the Jews: Volume 1: The Years of Persecution 1933-1939. Harper Perennial, 1998. ISBN-10: 0060928786.

---. Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945: The Years of Extermination.Harper Perennial, 2008. ISBN-10: 0060930489.

Spiegelman, Art. The Complete Maus. 25th Anniversary Edition. Pantheon, 1996. ISBN-10: 0679406417.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 30 - December 16, 2015. No class on November 11 and 25, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

By studying literature and cinema, students in this course will learn about various African cultures, traditions, and institutions. The class will show how French-speaking African writers and film-makers use literature and films to build narratives concerning African cultures and societies. At the same time, their work offers a counternarrative to persistent images of life in Africa. Our focus will be on West Africa, which forms a cultural entity, and three themes that correspond to three historical periods: first, “Ancient Africa,” with an emphasis on storytelling and oral traditions; second, “The Clash of Cultures,” which deals with the colonization of Africa and its consequences; and third, “African Women and the Role of Women in Contemporary Society.”  We will look at how these themes are explored in articles, fiction, and poetry, using films to illustrate the cultural elements discussed in the written material. The course ends with a traditional cultural “performance.”

Required Reading:

Please note that the following texts are listed in the order in which they will be discussed in class.

Niane, D.T.  Sundiata. An Epic of Old Mali. Pearson, 2006. ISBN-13:  9781405849425.

Ousmane, Sembène. God’s Bits of Wood. Heinemann, 1996. ISBN-10: 0435909592.

Barry, Mariama. The Little Peul. University of Virginia Press, 2010. ISBN-13: 9780813929637.

Diome, Fatou. The Belly of the Atlantic. Trans. Ros Schwartz and Lulu Norman. Serpent’s Tail, 2008. ISBN-10: 1852429038.  

Additional PDF articles will be uploaded by the Coordinator to an online cloud storage, to which registered students will be emailed the link in early fall.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 27, Feb. 3. 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 24, 31, April 7, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Perennially fascinating, ancient Greek mythology has inspired and continues to inform creative activity from “highbrow” literature to popular media. This course will explore major mythological events and characters beginning with the creation tale, which features a succession of generations of gods embroiled in gender and generational conflict. We will examine the gods’ importance in ancient Greek ritual and cultural life and then hero tales—Herakles, Oedipus, the Trojan War cycle, and more. By appreciating the diversity and complexities of ancient Greek mythological tales, we can move beyond the merely entertaining stories to learn that these myths touch on virtually every aspect of human relationships and activities. The stories reveal ancient Greek thinking on profound human issues, and these insights will in turn illuminate our contemporary values and beliefs.

Required Reading:

Powell, Barry B. Classical Myth.  8th ed. Longman, 2014. ISBN-13: 978-0321967046.

Please note: This is the newest edition, but earlier esitions are acceptable, too.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. September 30 - December 16, 2015. No class on November 11 and 25, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

How can we best know the past, and how much can we really know of it?

This interdisciplinary course will seek answers to these questions in relation to mid-Victorian England. We will read primary material published around 1859, providing a “snapshot” of a particularly important moment in the middle of one of the world’s most interesting centuries. The readings will include two novels and diverse original texts drawn from political, economic, scientific, social, and popular writing. Expect authors as well-known as Karl Marx and as new to modern readers as Isabella Beeton, whose book on domestic management invented the genre Martha Stewart now commands. Darwin’s writings will provide an interesting context for examining George Eliot’s novel about human instinct, while G. H. Lewes’s Physiology of Common Life will offer a glimpse into medicoscientific thinking of the time. Other readings explore the Great Exhibition of 1851, popular economics, London street life, and political theory.

Required Reading:

Makepeace Thackeray, William. Vanity Fair. Ed. John Carey. Penguin Classics, 2003. ISBN-10: 0141439831.

Eliot, George. Adam Bede. Ed. Margaret Reynolds. Penguin Classics, 2008. ISBN-10: 0140436642.

Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 24, 31, April 7, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The “scandalous female genre” has long had box-office value and cultural presence. This seminar explores the history of such women in films. We will first discuss genre conventions: how film style and storytelling present and comment on scandalous behavior. We then will explore how film-industry conditions permit and encourage portraying scandalous females. Each week we will engage a key question of interpretation: whether the character’s scandalous behavior is shameful, or whether it reveals and critiques gender norms and social-cultural conventions. This seminar covers: early film melodrama; the 1920s “new woman”; Production Code self-censorship (precode sexual-harassment films, code-era exploitation and containment of scandalous women, and postcode “adult-theme” women); how film promotion employs gender, genre, and star images; scandalous and unruly women of color; and second- and third-wave feminist icons.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$205
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 4 - December 13, 2017. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar focuses on the six poets (one recently rediscovered) who most defined  English Romanticism in poetry and verse drama between 1798 and 1824. It emphasizes their philosophical, emotional, and stylistic tugs-of-war, despite their quite different politics: first, between proposals for revolutions in social organization and how individuals relate to the wider world (they all knew the American and French revolutions of the 1770s-90s), and second, retrogressive longings for earlier orders of being and poetic styles whose revivals promised a better world than the emerging one of rapid social changes and aggressive industrialism. Each class examines their most progressive and simultaneously regressive tendencies, the special paradoxes that still make these poets so revealing about the post-Enlightenment dawning of the modern world. The six poets are: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Mary Robinson, Byron, Keats, and Shelley.

Required Reading:

Robinson, Mary. Selected Poems. Ed. Judith Pascoe. Ontario, Canada: Broadview Press, 1999.  ISBN-10: 1551112019; ISBN-13: 978-1551112015.

The Longman Anthology of British Literature, Volume 2A: The Romantics and Their Contemporaries. Ed. David Damrosch et al. 5th ed. Pearson, 2011. ISBN-10: 0205223168; ISBN-13: 978-0205223169.

 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 11, 25, April 1, 8, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The short story has held a prominent place in Latin American literature for at least 200 years, but it is only within the past few decades that it has become widely known in translation. The course will use the short story as a vehicle to introduce some of Latin America’s best-known writers, including Nobel Laureates Miguel Angel Asturias (Guatemala), Gabriel García Márquez (Colombia), and Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru), as well as Jorge.Luis Borges (Argentina) and Isabel Allende (Chile and the U.S.). The course will draw on their short stories and those of a few younger writers, including outstanding U.S. Latino and Latina writers. It will focus on the cultural, artistic, social, and political dimensions of a wide variety of this fascinating literary form.

Required Reading:

Roberto González Echevarría, editor. The Oxford Book of Latin American Short Stories. Oxford University Press, 1997. ISBN 13 978-0-19-513085-0.

Carlos Fuentes and Julio Ortega, editors. The Vintage Book of Latin American Short Stories. Vintage, 2000. ISBN 0-679-77551-X.

Jorge Luis Borges. Labyrinths: Selected Stories and Other Writings. New Directions, 1964. ISBN-13:978-0811216999.

Roberto González Echevarría. Modern Latin American Literature: A Very Short Introduction. 2012. ISBN 978-0-19-975491-5.

Gabriel García Márquez. Collected Stories. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 1999. ISBN 0-06-093268-6 or 978-0-06-093268-8.

Juan Rulfo. The Plain in Flames, 2012. University of Texas Press. ISBN 978-0-292743854.         

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. November 5 - December 3, 2015. No class on November 26, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Dante’s Purgatorio, as is well known, is not a standalone text; it is simply the second part of The Divine Comedy. In this course we will deal with Dante’s views on redemption and salvation as represented in his Purgatorio. Our focus will be the nature of sin: How it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony). And how human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with divine assistance). We will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, as well as the theology implicit in it. Dante’s Purgatorio changes the tone of the Comedy, illustrating how people can become “pure and ready to rise to the heavens.”

Required Reading:

Alighieri, Dante. Purgatorio. Trans. Jean and Robert Hollander. Anchor, 2004. ISBN-10: 0385497008.

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m September 28 - December 7, 2017. PLEASE NOTE THAT CLASS STARTS ONE WEEK EARLIER THAN DESCRIBED IN THE BROCHURE! No class on November 23.
McClelland Hall, room # 123, 1130 East Helen Street
Past Course

This course explores Islam and Muslim societies in the contemporary period. It begins by focusing on the fundamentals of Islam, such as the life of Muhammad, the Qur’an, law, and theology. The topics we will discuss include opportunities for Muslims in the United States, Islamic spirituality (including Sufism), and successful Muslim-majority countries, such as Indonesia. The primary challenges we will address include political authoritarianism, sectarianism, and religious extremism. The objective of this seminar is to provide accurate information about the religion of Islam and to demystify Muslim cultures that frequently are portrayed in the media as violent and irrationally hostile to the West. Seminarians are encouraged to bring their questions regarding Islam and Muslims to this class.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS CLASS WILL BEGIN ON SEPTEMBER 28 AND END ON DECEMBER 7!

 

 

Required Reading:

Allen Roger and Shawkat M. Toorawa, eds. Islam: A Short Guide to the Faith. Eerdmans, 2011. ISBN-10: 080286600X; ISBN-13: 978-0802866004. 

Devji, Faisal. Landscapes of the Jihad. Cornell UP, 2017. ISBN-10: 1849047200; ISBN-13: 978-1849047203.

Kahf, Mohja. The Girl in the Tangerine Scarf: A Novel. New York: Carroll and Graf Publishers, 2006.  ISBN-10: 0786715197; ISBN-13: 978-0786715190.

 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. September 15 - December 15, 2017. No classes on October 6, October 20, November 10, and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on Terror. The course lectures will emphasize the remarkable continuity of U.S. policy from the Cold War through the period after it.

This course is a repeat of the class given in Spring 2016.

Required Reading:

Layne, Christopher. The Peace of Illusions: American Grand Strategy from 1940 to the Present. New York: Cornell University Press, 2007. ISBN-10: 0801474116.

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 600 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. September 30 - October 28, 2015 (EVENING CLASS!) Please note that this course is NOT held in the Rubel Room in the Poetry Center, but in room # 410 of the Modern Languages Building instead. Convenient parking is available in the Second Street Parking Garage for $5.00 per class.
Modern Languages 410
Past Course

Many of Shakespeare’s most powerful, intelligent, and subversive characters are female. How were such vividly complex roles constructed in a culture that legally defined women as property on the grounds of their intellectual and moral inferiority? Given the early modern imperatives of feminine silence, chastity, and obedience, how is it that women impel Shakespeare’s plots, orchestrate conflicts, and—in many instances— impose “resolutions”?

This course will address the social and historical contexts of Shakespeare's women and how the playwright both generates and subverts his culture’s assumptions about gender. While examining the extraordinary vitality of his female characters, we will ask: What is their relation to the state, the family, the church, political economy, and desire? In short, what is their relation to order and disorder?

Each class will focus on a different play: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, and Othello.

Required Reading:

You may read any unabridged edition of the plays that you already own. Please bring the assigned text to each class meeting, including the first day.

Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night’s Dream (The Pelican Shakespeare). Penguin Classics, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0140714555.

---. Romeo and Juliet. (The Pelican Shakespeare). Penguin Classics, 2000.ISBN-13: 978-0140714845.

---. As You Like It. (The Pelican Shakespeare). Penguin Classics, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0140714715.

---. The Merchant of Venice. (The Pelican Shakespeare). Penguin Classics, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0140714623.

---. Othello. (The Pelican Shakespeare). Penguin Classics, 2001. ISBN-13: 978-0140714630.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27, March 6, 13, 27, April 3, 10, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Can a movie probe more deeply into theology than other works? Can it show the strengths and weaknesses of religious thought more directly, more dramatically? This seminar probes theology and film, examining movies with strong Christian themes. We will use film criticism and literary and art theories to look at and interpret movies that address the spiritual dimensions of life. The class will study classic directors like Buñuel, Pasolini, and Zeffirelli, tease out new meaning from familiar texts such as A Man for All Seasons and The Matrix, and make brief forays into many less familiar works and genres: Gladiator to Battlestar Galactica, an episode of Yes, Prime Minister, and one from the standup comedy of “executive transvestite” Eddie Izzard. Thoughtful analysis of a movie opens discussion up to multiple meanings, and we will think through films that question, explore, and compare ideas.

 

Required Reading:

Bolt, Robert. A Man for all Seasons: A Play in Two Acts. Vintage paperback, 1990. ISBN-10: 0679728228.

Osborne, John. John Osborne: Plays 3. Contemporary Classics, 1998. ISBN-10: 0571178472.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. October 12 - November 2, 2017.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Past Course

ATTEND THIS COURSE IN OUR NEW ORO VALLEY LOCATION

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine ComedyInferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization of his hell, from lesser to greater sins, the numerous historical personages and references in it, and its implicit theology. We will also look at Dante’s narrative, discussing how the actions of his characters and their respective punishments depict the true nature of the sins.

The purpose of Dante’s voyage is not about merely observing the torments of the damned, but rather about gaining knowledge of the true nature of evil. While many contemporary readers might disagree with the categories of Dante’s sins, the question of evil is as relevant today as it was in the fourteenth century.

Required Reading:

Alighieri, Dante.  The Inferno.  Trans. Jean and Robert Hollander.  New York: Random House, 2002.  ISBN: 978-0385496988.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$85
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What were the key technologies and major technical achievements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines crucial technological wonders from ancient Greece, focusing on: temple construction (the Parthenon), the mastery of fire for bronzes (the Delphi Charioteer) and ceramics (the Euphronios Vase), and the transformation of marble into sculptures (the Aphrodite of Melos). We will look at the qualities of the raw materials used, the technological know-how of ancient craftspeople, the scientific principles of their work, the interconnection of various crafts, as well as the social, political, and cultural milieus that promoted their breakthroughs. The course also explores their workshops, toolkits, apprenticeship structures, and technological treatises. Ancient evidence (archaeological, visual, textual) and modern comparisons with traditional crafts will elucidate our discussions of these ancient masterpieces.

Required Reading:

There are no textbooks required for this class. Readings will be made avaiable on our password-protected website at http://course.hsp.arizona.edu by early April.

 

Tuition:
$205
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 3 - December 15, 2017. No class on November 21.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar examines the relations between culture and power in nineteenth-century France through the study of masterpieces of realist fiction. The realist novel is a cultural artefact specific to the nineteenth century, a genre born with the modern democratic nation-state at a time when (relative) freedom of expression allowed for the emergence of a public sphere. The four novels studied in this course also have in common that they are romans d’éducation (or Bildungsroman) thematically focused on young men’s struggles to succeed in a democratized society, i.e., to reap the revolutionary promise of freedom, fraternity, and equality. By giving voice and shape to the sociopolitical aspirations of the French people, the novel responded to the needs of an increasingly large reading public that faced the same dilemmas and recognized itself in it.

 

Required Reading:

Stendhal (Henri Beyle). The Red and the Black. (1830). Ed. and Trans. Roger Gard. Penguin Classics, 2004. ISBN-10: 0140447644. ISBN-13: 978-0140447644.        

Balzac, Honoré de. Lost Illusions. (1836). Trans. Herbert J. Hunt. Penguin Classics, 1976. ISBN-10: 0140442510. ISBN-13: 978-0140442519.

Flaubert, Gustave. Sentimental Education. (1869). Ed. Geoffrey Wall. Trans. Robert Baldick. Penguin Classics, 2004. ISBN-10: 0140447970. ISBN-13: 978-0140447972.

Zola, Emile. The Masterpiece. (1886). Ed. Roger Pearson. Transl. Thomas Walton. Oxford World's Classics, 2008. ISBN-10: 0199536910.  ISBN-13: 978-0199536917.

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 28 - April 7, 2016. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The first great work of Western literature, Homer’s phenomenal epic The Iliad, sings of the Trojan War, its horrors and its glories. To the ancient Greeks war was a fact of life. Proving oneself in battle was fundamental to becoming a man. Despite modern Western beliefs that we can resolve conflicts diplomatically, war still confronts us. Today, facing an implacably savage enemy leaves many conflicted about the morality of warfare.

Greek warfare differed from modern practices: unquestioningly accepting that war was necessary; promoting the material gains of war; glorifying the warrior; and especially the concept of a “beautiful death.” Appreciating the range of ancient Greek views about war will broaden students’ perspective on contemporary issues, and the portrayals of these views through the intensified dramatics of the plays we will read will vibrantly engage students.

 

Required Reading:

Please note: You may use any translation of the assigned plays that you have or find ready access to in hard copy or online. The books ordered are the fewest available with decent translations at a fairly low price.

Aeschylus. Oresteia. Trans. Peter Meineck. Hackett Publishing, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0872203907.

The Complete Aeschylus: Volume II: Persians and Other Plays. Trans. by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2009.ISBN-13: 978-0195373288.

The Complete Sophocles: Volume II: Electra and Other Plays. Trans. by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2009.ISBN-13: 978-0195373301.

Euripides. Electra and Other Plays. Trans. by John Davie. Penguin Classics, 1999. ISBN-13: 978-0140446685.

Aristophanes: The Complete Plays. Trans. by Paul Roche. Penguin, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0451214096.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 17, Dec. 1, 8, 15, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course examines the issues, artists, and theories surrounding the rise of Postmodernism in the visual arts from 1970 into the twenty-first century. We will explore the emergence of pluralism in the visual arts against a backdrop of the rise of the global economy. And we will look at the “crisis” of postmodern culture, which critiques ideas of history, progress, and personal and cultural identities, as well as embracing irony and parody, pastiche, nostalgia, mass or “low” culture, and multiculturalism.

In a chronological fashion, and framed by a discussion of such midcentury artistic predecessors as Abstract Expressionism, Pop, and Minimal Art, the class traces the wide-ranging visual art practices that emerged in 1970s: Conceptual Art, Performance, Feminist Art and identity politics, art activism, the culture wars, Appropriation Art, Neoexpressionism, Street Art, the Young British Artists, the Museum, and Festivalism.

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar begins by putting Dubliners and Portrait of an Artist into their social and literary contexts. We will then spend two meetings on each work. Though in different genres—the short story and the education novel—they are companion pieces in significant ways. Dubliners illustrates the oppression of Irish Catholics by British Protestants and by Irish Catholics themselves through the strictures of the institutionalized Church. A Portrait tells the tale of an individual who refuses to submit to either authority, and who seeks artistic freedom to write. The seminar will explore these themes through an examination of the works' range of styles and overall narrative structures. The ultimate aim will be to understand how Dubliners and A Portrait provide a “moral history” of Ireland, and how the writer can in Joyce's words “forge in the smithy of his soul the uncreated conscience of his race.”

Required Reading:

Joyce, James. Dubliners. Dover Thrift Editions, 1991. ISBN-10:0486268705.

---. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Penguin Classics, 2003. ISBN-13:978-0142437346.

Please note that Professor Medine will be using the above editions and will be referring to them througout the course.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What's really in the Bible? As opposed to what we've been told by well-meaning but often not well-informed parents, clergy, and others? This course provides an innovative look at many instructive and amusing aspects of this most consequential book in Western culture. It examines clichés and received wisdom about the text, with a view to replacing widely accepted readings with students’ own more informed and insightful revisionings of the book. Not your average Bible reading class, this course aims to explore many controversial and contested passages, and to explode preconceived and ill-considered views about them.

For instance, did you know that Moses and Aaron were born of incest? That Abraham allowed his wife--who was his half-sister--to serve in the harems of two kings? That God tried, after browbeating Moses into leading the exodus, to kill him--with no warning or explanation?

And there are more surprises:

  • The sin of Onan had nothing to do with masturbation, but was instead his refusal to impregnate his brother’s widow.
  • Judah, ancestor of the greatest tribe of Israel, ordered his daughter-in-law to be burnt for harlotry, but desisted when he was exposed as one of her customers.
  • David said that his love for Jonathan, Saul’s son, was “passing the love of women.”
  • After becoming king, David committed adultery and then murder to cover it up.
  • Solomon had his older brother, the rightful heir to the throne, executed on a trumped-up charge involving yet another concubine of David.
  • Even in the New Testament Jesus says, “Think not that I am come to send peace on earth; I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother.”

The course will examine explanations for these and other Biblical “problems” with the help of recent scholarship. To see the Bible in its depth and complexity, we will look at its blunt, earthy vigor and surprising treatments of God as a character in these stories: hence the focus on texts that are shocking, lurid, or simply inexplicable.

We will begin with the complex of legends about Moses and the possible historical reality behind his story. Then we will go back to the legends of Genesis, dominated by fratricidal conflict. Next, we follow the linked themes of warriors versus shepherds through several books, including the insistence that God is the true warrior-king and that human kingship is an affront to him. Finally, we arrive at David, who is the great ambiguous figure in the Bible. Additionally, we will explore why the Bible had such a formative effect on Western culture, one that transcends all the religious formulations that sought to embody it.

If you are open-minded and can tolerate my love of digressions (which I share with Holden Caulfield) and of sarcasm (my college major), you are welcome. Bring a Bible: any translation will do.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 25 - April 4, 2016. No class on March 14.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Why study the Tudors? This dynasty has a special place in English history because it presided over the transition from medieval to modern (or so most historians, but not all, argue). In addition, the major figures, especially Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, have long fascinated historians and the general public. This period also contained the Reformation in England that separated the English church from the papacy in Rome.

The Tudors have transcended the sphere of history, for they are now the rock stars of contemporary media. In movies, novels, and television series the Tudors live on, achieving notice unmatched by any other family. This course will examine the contemporary fame of the Tudors, try to separate fact from fiction, and set the Tudor century in appropriate context.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$150.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00-3:00 p.m. October 3 until December 12, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Utilitarianism is the idea that one ought to perform those actions that produce the greatest happiness for the greatest numbers, which is one of the most important views of morality ever developed. In this course we will explore Utilitarianism’s philosophical origins, its influences on politics and literature, and recent attempts to show that contemporary neuroscience and psychology validate it. We will read works of the philosophers David Hume, Adam Smith, and John Stuart Mill, and excerpts from the novels of Dickens and Dostoevsky. The contemporary writers we will critically examine include the Princeton philosopher Peter Singer, whose controversial Utilitarian views have sparked intense and often vitriolic political and moral debate throughout the world, and the Harvard psychologist Joshua Greene, who has claimed that the fMRI results of people making moral decisions provide powerful reasons for us all to become Utilitarians.

Required Reading:

Bentham, Jeremy. The Classical Utilitarians: Bentham and Mill. Hackett Pub. Co., 2003. ISBN: 0872206491.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 29 - December 15, 2016. No class on October 27 and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

We initiate a year of exploring Homer by reading his scintillating epic poem presenting a few days near the Trojan War’s end: The Iliad. While the poem highlights battle and military matters, human complexities also emerge: conflict between military and domestic realms; women as war prizes or prized family members; the role of gods; concepts of heroism; ways of warfare; the oral tradition; creation of poetry; and more. The aim is to appreciate from multiple perspectives The Iliad’s exquisite poetry and its multilayered ideas about war, peace, and related themes. A greater understanding of Greek thinking, pivotal in the development of Western culture, provides valuable insights into our own views about these complex social issues and why this remarkable ancient poem continues to influence our contemporary ideas and creativity.

Required Reading:

Homer. Iliad. Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Hackett Classics, 1997. ISBN-13: 978-0-87720-352-5.

Professor
Tuition:
$120
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 4 - May 25, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The United States was founded on broad principles of individual freedom – declarations of the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” were central to the American Revolution and the subsequent foundations of the new country. Looking back, we know that those rights were meant at the time for white land-owning men, and it was only after two centuries of discrimination that formal actions were taken to eliminate institutional racism and gender discrimination from U.S. law.

This dismantling of institutional racism did not, however, encompass all Americans. Today, American Indians and Alaska Natives are under tremendous regulation and government oversight, regulations that do not apply to other groups within the United States. Each week of the class will focus on a different aspect of these regulations, with a particular focus on family and children, religion and culture, and control over various forms of property.

Required Reading:

Your instructor will be preparing an electronic course packet which will contain the readings for the course. The course packet will contain a few required readings, some optional readings for each day, and recommendations for further reading on each topic.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Alexander Hamilton promised that the Constitution would “unite parties for the general welfare,” but Washington perceived that “the baneful effects of the spirit of Party” continued to threaten the republic.  In the centuries since, we have blamed partisans and identified with parties.   Both of our major parties are grab bags of discordant factions, as we will discuss with an eye to how politicians appeal to common aspirations and contradictory assumptions.   As part of our discussions, we will look at the historical evolution of party politics, including campaigns, polls, slogans, conventions, debates, and political rhetoric more generally.  This historical perspective will provide us with opportunities to step back from partisan politics to reflect upon other pivotal moments in the history of American politics.
 
The course will begin by reviewing the political writings that shaped the constitution of the national government, and shared assumptions about the national character.  We will use the writings of Madison, Hamilton, and Jefferson to explore the morals and mores of representative self-governance.   Our Constitution was meant to form a harmonious balance among competing factions.  Factionalism was traditionally seen to arise from the heated rhetoric of demagogues who undermined the common good by inflaming self-interest.  Those anxieties deepened with the populist politics of the Jacksonian era.  The emergence of the first political parties in the early nineteenth century will provide us with a frame of reference for reflecting upon the traditional republican assumption that deliberations upon our shared values can enable us to achieve the common good.
 
The election of Andrew Jackson will provide the first of several pivotal campaigns that we will use to explore the evolution of party politics.  We will trace that evolution by examining how differing demographical groups have shaped the ideologies of political parties, including not only the entrance of women and minorities into the political process, but also how class, education, and regional differences have shaped who and what gets represented in our political deliberations.  We will use these factors to assess the development of particular aspects of political campaigns, including advertising, opinion polls, rhetorical appeals such as ethos and pathos, and campaign themes that attempt to represent who we are and what we value.
 
These historical points of reference will be used to frame discussions of the political campaigns of 2012.  Each week we will focus on a particular aspect of the campaigns, such as primaries, ads and slogans, opinion polls of demographic groups, and representations of issues such as taxation, education, and war.  We will frame these aspects of the campaign by drawing historical parallels with previous pivotal elections.  For example, we will examine how current candidates represent current international conflicts, financial crises, regulatory priorities, and taxation, and then we will look to other elections where wars abroad and woes at home figured into debates about who will best represent our shared needs and aspirations.

Required Reading:

Lipsman, Ron. Liberal Hearts and Conservative Brains: The Correlation between Age and Political Philosophy. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse, 2007. ISBN: 978-0-595-46320-6.
 
Lakoff, George. The Political Mind: Why You  Can’t Understand 21st-Century American Politics with an 18th–Century Brain. Viking Adult, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-143-11568-7.

Professor
Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Professor Kosta repeats her popular course from 2015 with a few variations:

Germany’s Weimar Republic (1919-1933) rose out of the ashes of World War I to become both an immensely creative and fraught period of the twentieth century. The exciting capital Berlin, a laboratory of modernity, was the center of radical experimentation in the visual and performing arts, in mass entertainment and theater, and in literature and architecture. While the cultural stage was vibrant and intoxicating, the shell shock of World War I, the demands of the Versailles Treaty, economic instability, social upheaval, and political turmoil also haunted the celebrated roaring twenties. To explore the rich landscape of the 1920s, this seminar examines the avant-garde movements Expressionism and Dada along with the vast social changes and technological developments exemplified in Lang’s film Metropolis and Brecht’s theater. Still relevant today, this period continues to fascinate us.

The movie The Blue Angel will be screened in the classroom on February 12, 2018.

Required Reading:

Brecht, Bertold. A Man’s A Man:  Early Plays by Bertolt Brecht. Ed. Eric Bentley.  Grove Press, New York. Paperback. 2007. ISBN-13: 9780802131591. 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m January 28, February 4, 11, 18, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In 2013 we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Richard Wagner (1813–1883). Perhaps no other composer so changed the course of music history through the way he reconceived the nature of opera and the way he stretched the boundaries of tonality. Many composers who followed found themselves swept up in these new approaches to form and harmony.
 
Four classes will consider Wagner in terms of both biography and music. The first two will provide an overview of Wagner’s life, including his background and education, his practical experience in the opera house (emphasizing his years as Kapellmeister in Dresden), and the creation and establishment of the Wagner festival in Bayreuth. In addition, these sessions will briefly discuss his first operas and will look at the distinctive features of the operas written before his banishment from Germany (The Flying Dutchman, Tannhauser, and Lohengrin).
 
The third and fourth classes will focus on Wagner’s musical techniques, including his radical new approach in the four operas that make up The Ring Cycle. The course closes with a look at Tristan and Isolde, The Meistersingers, and Wagner’s last opera, Parsifal.

 

Required Reading:

Millington, Barry. Wagner. Princeton University Press, 1992.  ISBN: 0691027226.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. February 1 - 29, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Art has often been plundered or stolen during times of war, occupation, or even peace. This course explores the historical, political, and legal framework of specific moments when art has been taken. The class focuses on how art has been used for propagandistic purposes, as pawns in high-stakes politics, or as a “cash cow” in the legitimate or black market. It also looks at ethical issues of museum collecting, the debate over cultural property, and the dilemma of recovery or repatriation of stolen art. Case studies include the looting of Greece by the Romans; plunder of art from Italy and Egypt by Napoleon Bonaparte; removal of sculpture from the Parthenon by Lord Elgin; seizure by the Nazis of art from Jews and museums; recent cases of the looting of archaeological sites and museums, especially in conflict zones in the Middle East; and museum thefts in Europe and the U.S.

Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 10, 17, 24, 31, June 7
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course explores the work of speculative fiction writer Octavia Butler, recipient of the Hugo and Nebula awards and a MacArthur “genius.” Credited with influencing the field of Afrofuturist studies, Butler rendered a dystopian vision of the world, one rooted in her own experiences as a Black woman in twentieth-century America. Like all good literature, her work says something important about the period in which she wrote. It was also eerily prescient and can serve as a lens turned on our current moment of political instability, climate change, inequality, social disorder, and the Movement for Black Lives. The course will incorporate original texts alongside supplemental materials and will focus on the recurring themes of race, gender, sexuality, environmentalism, reproduction, social hierarchies, and varied meanings of human. There has never been a more apt and rewarding time to reexamine Octavia Butler’s award-winning work and to reimagine human futures. 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 27 until April 7, 2014 (no class on March 17 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

England during the reign of Victoria is famous for industrial, scientific, and technological advances, as well as sexual repression. But it was also an era when the ghost story – and its extensions in longer fictions during one of the heydays of the English novel – flourished in print just as old traditions about the spirit world were being called into question by the many supposed “progresses” of the day. This seminar sets out to explain both the wide range of ghost stories during the time before and after Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” in 1843 (which will be included) and the many ways that “ghostliness” was incorporated into seemingly “realistic” Victorian fictions from Dickens to Henry James, partly through their reworkings of the earlier “Gothic” tradition in fiction and drama.

Required Reading:

1. Cox, Michael, and R. A. Gilbert, eds. The Oxford Book of Victorian Ghost Stories. Oxford UP, 2003. ISBN-10: 0192804472.

2. Le Fanu, Joseph Sheridan. Carmilla. Ed. Kathleen Costello-Sullivan. Syracuse UP, 2013. ISBN-13: 978-0815-63311-2.

3. Dickens, Charles. Great Expectations. Ed. Janice Carlisle.  Bedford/St. Martin's, 1995. ISBN-13: 978-0312080822.

4. Collins, Wilkie. The Woman in White. Ed. John Sutherland. Oxford UP, 2008. ISBN-10: 0199535639.

5. Wells, H. G. The Island of Dr. Moreau. Signet Classics, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-045152-9893.

6. James, Henry. The Turn of the Screw. Ed. Peter G. Beidler. Bedford/St. Martin's, 2003. ISBN-13: 978-0312-59706-1.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. September 29 - December 8, 2016. No class on November 24.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

This course steps back from polls and punditry to reflect on broader historical developments. It considers women in politics, divisions between rich and poor, and ethnic minorities becoming the new majority. To deepen our analyses, we will consider writings on politics and ethics, including some that shaped the founding of the republic as well as recent research on political cognition and moral imagination. That research has brought us back to Hume’s view that “reason is a slave of the passions,” something abundantly apparent in the current campaign. Stepping back from the attack ads, we will reflect on the rhetorical dynamics of American politics, including ongoing shifts in the principal parties, the role of debates as tests of character, the evolution of media and advertising, and other factors that shape how we feel about politics.

Required Reading:

You do not need to purchase any texts. All the readings for this course are available from the links in the syllabus. Closer to the beginning of the course the instructor will be creating a webpage with easy to print versions of these readings. Students enrolled in this course will get access to this webpage when it is completed.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 -4:00 p.m. Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4, 18, Dec. 2, 9, and 16, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

According to George Kennan, the Great War was “the seminal event of the Twentieth Century.” The war triggered both the Russian Revolution and the Irish Rebellion, and ended by toppling monarchies and destroying empires.

But perhaps the “shock of the new” that most surprised was the horror of modern, mechanized warfare. T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front are probably the most famous postwar texts, but they are only two of many brilliant literary works the war produced and that we will read. English poets like Wilfred Owen reshaped the way we perceive not only war but language itself.  And authors like Ernest Hemingway in In Our Time, and Humphrey Cobb in The Paths of Glory have brought the war into more recent books and films.

The Great War created a new kind of literature, ranging from pulp fiction to radical experimentations with form. This literary revolution occurred on both sides of the Atlantic and profoundly affected what we today call modernism.

Required Reading:

Blaisdell, Bob. World War One Short Stories. Dover Thrift Editions, 2013.ISBN-13: 978-0486485034.

Ward, Candace. World War One British Poets: Brooke, Owen, Sassoon,Rosenberg and Others. Dover Publications, 1997. ISBN-13: 978-0486295688.

Eliot, T.S. The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems. Dover Thrift Editions,1998. ISBN-13: 978-0486400617.

Remarque, Erich Maria. All Quiet on the Western Front. Trans. A. W. Wheen. Ballantine Books, 1987. ISBN-13: 978-0449213940.

Carr, J. L. A Month in the Country. NYRB Classics, 2000.ISBN-13: 978-0940322479.

Barker, Pat. Regeneration. Plume, 2013. ISBN-13: 978-0142180594.

West, Rebecca. The Return of a Soldier. Penguin Classics, 1998.ISBN-13: 978-0141180656.

Hemingway, Ernest. In Our Time. Scribner, 1996. ISBN-13: 978-0684822761.

Chandler, Raymond. The Big Sleep. Vintage, 1988.ISBN-13: 978-0394758282.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 30 - July 28, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Virgil, the greatest Roman poet, did more to establish the idea of Rome (and hence of the Roman Empire) than any other ancient poet. As a young man he began his poetic career writing pastoral poems, which are called Eclogues. This seminar will study the political pressures in the final days of the Roman Republic that led Virgil to invent a new genre of poetry. He borrowed the idea of the pastoral from the Hellenistic Greek poets, but made a new genre of poetry uniquely his own. Concentrating on a selection from Virgil’s Eclogues, this seminar will trace both the influence of the Greek tradition and Virgil’s own influence in creating a style and a genre of pastoral poetry that was to have immense significance in subsequent European poetry.

 

Required Reading:

Virgil. The Eclogues of Virgil: A Bilingual Edition. Trans. David Ferry. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. ISBN-10: 0374526966; ISBN-13: 978-0374526962.

Theocritus. Idylls. Trans. Anthony Verity. Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN-10: 0199552428; ISBN-13: 978-0199552429.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on: September 30, October 7, 14, 21, 28, November 4, 18, December 2, 9, 16, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Travels in Consciousness, taught by Norman Austin, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Classics,  will explore the history of consciousness as reflected in a variety of texts. Readings will range widely, from Bronze Age Greece to American authors of the Twentieth Century.  By “consciousness” is meant the ways in which individuals conceive of themselves and their world; it has to do not only with thought but also with feeling, volition, and behavior. So regarded consciousness constitutes individual identity and defines the human condition.  After an introductory presentation at the first meeting, the seminar will address itself to Homer’s Odyssey and Plato’s Phaedo, works that display two principal approaches to consciousness from antiquity: the poetic and the philosophical. Discussion of the Homeric consciousness will embrace such topics as fate, the gods, and the “self.” Plato’s dialogue will be studied as the seminal statement of the Platonic theory of the soul, which was adapted to become the foundation of Christian theology. The seminar will then leap forward to the English Renaissance and examine Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus as a dramatization of the tragediesinherent in the Platonic-Christian concept of the soul.  Matthew Arnold’s “Dover Beach” and T. S. Eliot’s “The Song of J. Alfred Prufrock,” will be studied as poems sounding the death knell in the 19th century of the Christian concept of the soul and the breakdown in the early 20th  century of the old forms and ideas that had dominated Western consciousness since antiquity.  Selections will also be read from Emily Dickinson’s poems and Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass as indicators of the birth of a new definitively American and post-Christian idea of the soul. The seminar will then move back in time to study the consciousness of a lady-in-waiting at the court of the Empress of Japan at Kyoto, circa 1000 CE, the setting of Sei Shonagon’s memoir, Pillow Book. The seminar will conclude withToni Morrison’s Sula, a novel written by a modern African-American woman, which reflects a search for a new vocabulary in which to represent consciousness of the modern age.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Join anthropologist and classical archaeologist David Soren for an overview of ancient Rome. Moving from the Early Iron Age to the so-called fall of the Roman Empire, the course will also look at the mysterious people known as the Etruscans. It will delve into Republican Rome’s development into an international powerhouse, drawing cultural inspiration from the ancient Greeks. The rise of Imperial Rome features propaganda-master Octavian, conqueror of Antony and Cleopatra, and heir to Julius Caesar. Finally, the class looks at the latest evidence about the “end” of Rome, highlighting Dr. Soren’s research with the University of Arizona Tree-Ring Laboratory and Yale University regarding the spread of malaria. Dr. Soren’s new textbook and videos on Roman archaeology will be used for the first time.

Professor
Tuition:
$205
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 19 through April 6, 2018 (no classes on March 2 & 9). Please note that the start date had to be moved up by one week.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Science fiction is a modern art form closely tied to advances in science and technology. It generates an imaginary space where a new development in science can be imaginatively tested for its possible effects on humanity. Some scenarios are cautionary, while others are hopeful and exhilarating. When combined with the fantasy genre, these stories set the imagination free to soar. This seminar will examine a series of great science fiction and fantasy narratives, including novels, short stories, movies, and TV shows. Whether the topic is robotics, artificial intelligence, space exploration, alien languages, enhanced intelligence, surveillance, time travel, or the future of gender, each of the works we consider will have a particular take on an alternate reality that humans may inhabit. 

Required Reading:

1. Chiang, Ted. Stories of Your Life and Others. Vintage Books, 2016. ISBN-10: 1101972122. 

2. Clarke, Arthur C. Childhood’s End. Del Rey Books, 1987. ISBN-10: 0345347951.  

3. Herbert, Frank. Dune. Ace Books, 1990. ISBN-10: 0441172717.   

4. Liu, Cixin. The Three-Body Problem, Tor Books, 2016. ISBN-10: 0765382032.

5. McCaffrey, Anne.  Dragonflight. Ballantine Books, 1986. ISBN-10: 0345335465.

6. Willis, Connie. To Say Nothing of the Dog, or, How We Found the Bishop’s Bird Stump at Last. Bantam Books, 1998. ISBN-10: 0553575384.

Other readings will be posted at Box@UA. Registered students will receive the link to that site to download these readings.

 

 

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon January 28, February 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 18, April 1, 8, 15, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Beginning with the German cinema of the 1920s and ending with contemporary films, this course provides a historical overview of influential German movies, major periods, and key filmmakers.
 
In the 1920s German cinema was one of Hollywood’s fiercest competitors, and the Ufa, Germany’s premier film studio, produced a body of innovative films that would become classics. Movies such as Nosferatu and Metropolis continue to influence filmmaking practices internationally. We will begin with a look at the cinema of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933) and the transition of silent film to sound film beginning with German cinema’s earliest sound film, The Blue Angel, the 1929 film that launched Marlene Dietrich into stardom.
 
The course then explores Nazi cinema (Leni Riefenstahl and Veit Harlan), the Hollywood films of German-speaking émigrés like Billy Wilder and Fritz Lang, postwar movies of West Germany, and the New German cinema. It looks at such topics as working through Germany’s fascist past (Rainer Werner Fassbinder), East German films, and then finally contemporary film and German unification (Florian von Donnersmarck and Fatih Akin). Given that German film is closely aligned with the history of the 20th century, the course relates the films to the social reality from which they emerged.

 

Required Reading:

Brockman, Stephen. A Critical History of German Film.  Rochester, NY: camden House, 2010.  ISBN: 978-1571134684.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. March 1 - April 5, 2016. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Superman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, Batman, Captain America, Green Lantern, Iron Man, Black Widow--the list of America’s superheroes is long. Comic books, TV, and cinema have long built up the appeal of superheroes, and they remain popular. Embodiments of cultural meanings, social practices, and political imaginaries, superheroes tell us stories about ourselves. Historically, representations of superheroes have been connected to national security and the Cold War, changing gender roles, racial stereotypes, and environmental issues. In this course we attend to gender, race, and sex as they play out in the bodies, lives, and storylines of America’s superheroes. We ask: What can Wonder Woman’s history tell us about gender and sex in the 20th century? How do Batman and Superman differently represent masculinity? And what do superheroes reveal about national identity, cultural memory, and collective hope? 

Required Reading:

DC Comics. Batman. A Simple Case (#44). 2015. ISSN: 2164-8735.  [Please note: This text is available for sale at “Heroes and Villains” at 4533 E. Broadway Blvd, Tucson, AZ 85711. All other texts have been ordered through the UA bookstore.]

Deconnick, Kelly Sue and David Lopez. Captain Marvel Vol. 1: Higher, Further, Faster, More. Marvel, 2014. ISBN-10: 0785190139.

Fletcher, Brenden, Cameron Stewart, and Babs Tarr. Batgirl Vol. 1 — The Batgirl of Burnside. DC Comics, 2015. ISBN-10: 1401257984.

Lepore, Jill. The Secret History of Wonder Woman. Vintage, 2015. ISBN-10: 0804173400.

Wilson, G. Willow and Adrian Alphona. Ms. Marvel Vol. 1: No Normal, 2014. ISBN-10: 078519021X.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 24 - December 10, 2018. No class on November 12 and November 19.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

2018 marks the centennial of the Great War, as World War I was originally known. The War ended the Concert of Europe, reworked global geography and transformed the domestic structures of the combatants. This course will examine the War’s origins, explore how it ended the major world empires, and trace the ways it still casts its shadow across the international community today. We will also consider the factors that motivated individuals to continue fighting even as the casualty lists reached catastrophic levels and few families avoided the loss of loved ones from battle, disease, or persecution. Finally, we will examine how World War I increased the United States’ participation in world affairs and set it on its path to global hegemony.

Required Reading:

Remarque, Erich Maria. All Quiet on the Western Front. Ballatine Books, 1987. ISBN-10: 0449213943.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
SECTION FULL -- TUESDAYS 1:00 until 4:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

There Is Nothing Like a Dame! celebrates the women of Broadway who wrote the scripts, composed the songs, penned the lyrics, designed, directed, choreographed, and starred in classics of the American musical theater.
 
The seminar introduces the women of the Golden Age of musical theater who paved the way for the women now working on new musicals for the millennium. Revel in archival performances by the great ladies of Broadway past and cheer for the new divas of the Great White Way who are creating musical memories for a new generation of theatergoers.
 
There Is Nothing Like a Dame! also goes behind the curtain to explore the contributions of women to the American musical. Fighting social and theatrical sexism, the great women of Broadway created a musical heritage that endures today. That great dame Ethel Merman said it best when she belted out “Anything You Can Do I Can Do Better!”

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. September 29 - December 8, 2016. No class on November 24.
Steward Observatory N 210, 933 N. Cherry Avenue
Past Course

This survey of astronomy begins here on Earth and heads outward to the ends of the observable universe. We will explore the Sun, the Moon, and the most interesting planets in our stellar neighborhood. Comets, asteroids, the Kuiper Belt, and the Oort Cloud are the next topics we will consider as we assess our solar-system environment. From our local solar system we then move to star formation and the nature of the Milky Way galaxy. Neutron stars, debris disks, supernovas, black holes, and dark matter follow.

Are we alone? How do you find an exoplanet? We will ask these questions as we study galaxies and cosmology: the expansion of the universe, dark energy, the Big Bang, wormholes, superstrings, and the possibility of other universes.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

I have put in [Ulysses] so many enigmas and  puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant.  James Joyce
                                                                                                                           
While most of the great avant-garde art works of the early 20thcentury rest securely within the canon of modernist classics, Ulysses (1922) continues to challenge and, as the author had hoped, puzzle us. We are still struggling to become Joyce’s contemporaries.
 
This seminar will continue the effort through a critical reading of the novel. After an introduction to some pertinent contexts, we shall proceed through several of the 18 episodes each meeting.
 
Weekly reading will average 80-some pages of the densely allusive narrative. The instructor will provide commentary and read crucial passages aloud. Ulysses is one of the most technically accomplished novels, and approaching it through listening is perhaps the surest way of becoming Joyce’s contemporary.

Required Reading:

There are two printings of the same edition of Ulysses, and either is acceptable.  Both printings contain the same text with the same pagination. 

Hard Copy:
Joyce, James. Ulysses. Modern Library, 1992.  ISBN 0-679-60011-6
 
Paperback:                                                                                                 
Joyce, James. Ulysses. Vintage, 1990. ISBN 0-679-72276-9  

Professor
Tuition:
$85
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 11:00 am July 6 - July 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The University of Arizona has one of America's greatest holdings in the field of vaudeville. Special Collections Guest Curator David Soren presents some of the best stars and specialty acts you've never heard of along with fascinating and little-known information about some of the biggest stars. Featured are vaudeville's most versatile performer Joe Cook, whose sidekick, pantomime comic Dave Chasen, founded Chasen's Restaurant (open 1936-1995) in West Hollywood. Learn about the dark side of Al Jolson, and witness one of his performances that was banned for many years on American television. See a portrait of Annette Kellerman, the Australian swimming superstar who pioneered the one-piece bathing suit and promptly got arrested! And much more.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

 With an eye to the esthetic qualities of the human body in motion, this course surveys diverse forms of dance in many cultures of the world in order to deepen our appreciation of the spiritual, emotional, and intellectual dimensions of this universal mode of expression. We begin with studying how and why the human body is uniquely designed for dancing. We continue with the study of rhythm as a psycho-kinesthetic phenomenon and observe how dance, song, and poetry arise in the same experience. We then trace the evolution of dance forms from spiritual to classical, folk, social, vernacular, and personal that societies typically develop through time. Special study will be given to the development of dance in ancient Greece that provided the foundation for dance as an art form in Western Civilization. The course is illustrated with visual and auditory materials of some of the most exotic and fascinating dance forms practiced in history and today. Live demonstrations and modest class participation will also animate our exploration of the Terpsichorean art!

Required Reading:

The instructor will put together a classnotes package that will become available for sale through the University of Arizona bookstore before the beginning of the class.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 1, 8, 15, 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will examine the social movements that came to the fore in the year that began with the Tet Offensive and ended with the launch around the moon. The first three classes will examine the antiwar, civil rights, and women’s movements using images and texts to consider what the ‘60s came to represent. In our last class we will consider how the divisions between the counterculture and “moral majority” led to the election of Richard Nixon—and to the antigovernment sentiments that have spread from left to right in recent decades. In the last class we will also examine the environmental movement as a final case to reflect upon how our political consciousness has evolved over the last half-century as guerilla wars have continued to rage on the evening news, minorities and women have struggled to claim their rights, and our sense of self has become ever more mediated.    

Required Reading:

Readings will be provided closer to the beginning of the course. They will be uploaded to a virtual site at Box@UA, the link of which will be shared with all registered students.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Our global environmental problems need attention from almost all legal disciplines, including constitutional law, property law, natural resources regulation, and international and comparative law.  This timely class presents core issues in environmental law – broadly construed -- based on cutting-edge research by faculty at the College of Law. The issues are: how environmental law can be grounded in water law (Glennon); environmental law's constraints and competing concerns within the context of  international trade (Gantz); how migration of species is and can be regulated, with special reference to invasive species (Miller); the contested climate-change challenge, with a focus on the pressing question of which role our courts are and should be playing(Engel); the potential for constructive interaction between traditional land law and environmental law (Stavang).

ENDRE STAVANG is Professor of Law at the University of Oslo and Visiting Scholar in Residence (2012-13) at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. He initiated the Research Group on Natural Resource Law in Oslo and leads its property team. Stavang was a Fulbright research scholar for one year at Yale Law School and has hands on experience as an appellate court judge and an in-house oil, gas, and energy lawyer.

ROBERT GLENNON is the author of Unquenchable: America’s Water Crisis and What To Do About It, which was published in April 2009 by Island Press. His previous books include the highly-acclaimed Water Follies: Groundwater Pumping and the Fate of America’s Fresh Waters (2002). Glennon is Regents Professor and Morris K. Udall Professor of Law and Public Policy in the Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona.

DAVID GANTZ is Samuel M. Fegtly Professor of Law and Director, International Trade Law Program. He teaches/has taught International Trade Law, International Environmental Law NAFTA and Other Trade Agreements, Public International Law, Introduction to American Law and European Union Law. He is a graduate of Stanford Law School, and his contributions to public and institutional service and he has received many awards bout for this and for his teaching.

MARC L. MILLER is the Interim Dean & Ralph W. Bilby Professor at the University of Arizona College of Law. Dean Miller taught at Emory University Law School from 1988-2005, where he served as Associate Dean for Faculty and Scholarship (2003-2005). He is a graduate of the University of Chicago Law School and the author of more than 70 articles and essays on a wide range of environmental, criminal justice, immigration and legal theory topics. He currently serves as a series editor for The Edge - books focused on the intersection of environmental science, law, and policy. Dean Miller has been a visiting professor at Stanford Law School and Duke Law School. Dean Miller is a member of the American Law Institute (ALI), and an advisor to various criminal justice and environmental publications and organizations.

KIRSTEN ENGEL is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law at the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona where she teaches and researches in the areas of environmental and administrative law. The emphasis of her more recent scholarship is the response of state and local governments to climate change in the United States and especially the constitutional and economic impediments these governments face seeking to mitigate climate change in the absence of comprehensive federal climate change legislation. Dean Engel is the co-author of an environmental law textbook, book chapters and articles. Her work appears in journals such as the UCLA Law Review Discourse, the Minnesota Law Review, and the Ecology Law Quarterly. Prior to joining the law faculty at the University of Arizona, Dean Engel held numerous permanent and temporary appointments within academia and in the public and nonprofit sectors, including the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Massachusetts' Attorney General's Office, and Harvard, Vanderbilt, and Tulane Law Schools.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 26 - February 23, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is mounting that intellectual challenge, social engagement, and regular physical activity can have a profound positive impact on our lives as we age. Why? Because they influence the ongoing alterations, or “plasticity,” in our ever-changing brains. This course examines the recent revolution in our views of brain function that gives us a new way to grasp how our brains work.

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 15 - November 5, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

The cello is an incredibly expressive and versatile instrument, reflecting the scope and trends of western music history. In this course, we will explore the origins of the cello, compare the unique artistries of historic cellists, enjoy movements from the monumental Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by Bach, look through the intimate lens of sonatas and chamber music, and indulge in the expressive and virtuosic brushstrokes of the concerto repertoire. Live performances by outstanding cellists from the University of Arizona Cello Studio will be featured in class. Finally, this incredibly rich and revealing repertoire will be framed within the larger context of the constantly changing trends that shape music history and culture.

 

Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 22 until April 2, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The youthful interests of Friedrich Nietzsche permeate his later work, for which the critical-creative writer is most widely known. We will first consider his early experiences, memories, illustrations, piano compositions, poetry, and prose, including his first major published writing, The Birth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Music, and university lectures on the pre-Socratics. The goal is to render a new and different reading that challenges contemporary perceptions, images, and conceptions of one of the most influential and controversial German writers of world literature.

Required Reading:

Nietzsche, Friedrich. Nietzsche: The Birth of Tragedy and Other Writings. Eds. Raymond Geuss and Ronald Speirs. Cambridge University, 1999. ISBN-10: 0521639875.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 18 - November 15, 2016
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

This course traces the often-changing experiences American Indians had from just before the War for Independence to the twentieth century. It will focus on how they dealt with the expanding nation and its pioneer citizens. Their tactics varied from contact, cooperation, and competition to conflict with the newcomers. Major differences in how the two races saw their lands and resources explain the violence that resulted. The U.S. lacked any consistent policy for its treatment of the tribes; and even when its goals seemed humane, their implementation could be disastrous. When military operations ended, most of the survivors lived on reservations until after World War II. Since then, educated tribal leaders, changing federal laws, waning anti-Indian prejudice, and increasing cultural pride have brought major changes to their situation in the general society.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. January 26, February 2, 9, 16, 23, March 1, 8, 22, 29, April 5, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course is for those who love to read ! Beginning with his memoir Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth and then moving into War and Peace, we will discuss the world that the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy created in his fictions against the backdrop of the social and political ferment that would ultimately lead to the 1917 revolution. Tolstoy attempted to find the family happiness in his novels that eluded him in his own life. Reading him is to gain insight into the unique role that literature played in political and philosophical thought in nineteenth century Russia. 

 

Required Reading:

Please note that this list is revised and differs from the texts listed in the spring 2012 brochure! Please make sure that you purchase the following two editions!

Tolstoy, Leo. Childhood, Boyhood, Youth. Trans. Rosemary Edmonds. Penguin Classics, 1964. ISBN-10: 0140441395; ISBN-13: 978-0140441390

Tolstoy, Leo. War and Peace. Trans. Louise and Aylmer Maude and Amy Mandelker. Oxford University Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 0199232768; ISBN-13: 978-0199232765

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm August 1 - August 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course examines modern histories of collective memories through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography, and visual culture. We will consider moments of tension when history and memory appear to be at odds, when competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict, or when silences about the past are broken. Case studies may include: the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian in 1995; appeals for apologies for past atrocities, such as slavery, human trafficking, or genocide; or lynching photographs in the “Without Sanctuary” exhibit of 2002. While the course emphasizes how societies come to terms with painful or shameful memories, we will also focus on the ways in which visual sources, particularly photographs, have shaped discourses of memory. By learning from scratch how to “read” historical photographs, we will interrogate the ways in which iconic images, snapshots, and “Kodak moments” have become integral to thinking about collective memory.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course tracks the downward spiral of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, starting from around 146 BC when Rome first firmly established herself as the world power and continuing through the Battle of Actium of 31 BC, where Octavian established his sole reign as ruler of the Mediterranean.

The main focus will be on primary ancient texts. We will read contemporary authors like Cicero (his orations and his personal letters), the historian Sallust and the campaign accounts of Julius Caesar. We will also read the later biographer Plutarch, whose Lives draw out timeless moral lessons about leadership. Finally, we will look at the poems of Catullus, who knew (and mocked) many of the key players of the day. Our main modern book, Scullard's From the Gracchi to Nero is a well known introduction to the time period. We may also look at contemporary portrayals of the late Roman Republic in modern popular fiction and film. This class will raise comparisons between the late Roman Republic and our own recent political history and will raise the questions as to whether such a study is useful in navigating our own current political situation…and if it is, how should we apply it?

Mike Lippman is a Lecturer in the Classics Department at the University of Arizona. His primary field of research is ancient drama, particularly Greek comedy. He has been involved in many modern reproductions of ancient plays as translator, actor, co director, and dramaturg. He also is particularly interested in the interplay of ancient political thought and its modern usage. He teaches classes on Sparta and Athens that not only explore antiquity but present the fascinating social experiments these societies represent.

Professor
Tuition:
$205
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 23 through April 3, 2018 ( no class on March 6)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron (ca. 1348-1351) is a masterpiece of world literature. Boccaccio is one of the Three Crowns, the three founding authors of Italian literature (along with Dante and Petrarch). Yet his Decameron is a conundrum. Composed in the wake of the Black Plague of 1348, the Decameron presents a world populated with flesh-and-blood individuals motivated by personal desires. Often its characters are women, and their desires are sexual; Boccaccio’s female characters use their intellect to achieve personal gratification. Yet to his contemporary readership, Boccaccio did not appear revolutionary. Although he was an innovative author in many ways, Boccaccio grounded his text in the tradition of bawdy literature already well established in the Middle Ages. In this seminar we will discuss the Decameron closely, examining its links to the works that preceded it, and its impact on subsequent literary developments throughout the world.  

Required Reading:

Boccaccio, Giovanni. The Decameron. Penguin Classics, 2nd edition. 2003. ISBN: 978-0140449303.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Contemporary Russia continues to search for a post-Soviet national identity:  what Russians refer to as their country’s “national idea.”  The return to the presidency of Vladimir Putin signifies that the country’s most historically significant leader since Stalin reassumes the decisive role as Russia continues to wrestle with its identity, sociopolitical goals, and position in the world community.  We focus on political system and institution building, elites, and socioeconomic change as we consider an emergent 21st -century Russian “national idea.”  The core concept of the “Russian soul” helps us focus on a new identity.

Contemporary Russia exhibits continuing revitalization and normalization, and we analyze these as we consider the priorities of the governing team and the preferences of the broader society.  Our group efforts to understand Russia’s evolution include not only political-institutional factors but fundamental cultural-historical elements.  Our judgments about a 21st -century national identity are set against the over 1,000-year history and experience of a sovereign Russia.
 

Required Reading:

Professor Willerton is putting together a FastCopy package that will be available from the UA bookstore after May 1.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 29 - April 8, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on Terror. The course lectures will emphasize the remarkable continuity of U.S. policy from the Cold War through the period after it.

Required Reading:

Layne, Christopher. The Peace of Illusions: American Grand Strategy from 1940 to the Present. New York: Cornell University Press, 2007. ISBN-10: 0801474116.

Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAY 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. January 22 until April 23, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break). Optional screenings of movies in the Rubel room on February 12, 19, and March 5.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What makes the French laugh? Why do the French like Jerry Lewis (and other comedians such as Charles Chaplin) so much?  Why does Hollywood remake so many French comedies? This interactive seminar responds to these questions by examining the comic and humor techniques used in French cinema throughout the years. In addition to watching and analyzing several representative films from different periods, participants will study the cultural and historic roots of French humor and laughter throughout history. Representative films (with English subtitles) and texts are used in our investigation. The forum for exchanging ideas will consist both of lectures and class discussions.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 28 - December 14, 2016. No class on October 12 and November 23.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

Stereotypes of dictators, machismo, endemic drug violence, and staunch Catholicism are often applied to Latin America. Countries as different as Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil are lumped together despite varying ethnicities and economics. How can we tell the difference between the myths and the realities? How can a little island like Cuba so enrage the United States? This ten-week course approaches these questions topically. Lectures and selected readings explore topics such as the decline of Catholicism, democracy, the role of Jews and Muslim immigrants in shaping this region, U.S.-Latin American relations, charismatic leaders, the history of drug production, and women in the future of Latin America. Military regimes and guerrilla movements will also be covered. The aim of this course is to inform, share opinions, entertain, and help people understand news and politics from an informed perspective.

Required Reading:

Students enrolling in this class do not need to purchase a textbook. Instead, readings uploaded to a secure site will be made accessible by the end of August.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

How do Shakespeare and filmmakers who adapt his plays engage their audiences, construct meaning, and enable us to understand more fully our own culture and ourselves? This seminar will deepen our understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s drama and of his cinematic interpreters.  We will focus on the following plays from three different genres—comedy, tragedy, and history: Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part I, Henry IV, Part II, and Henry V. Each of those plays will be paired with at least two film adaptations from different decades. We will think critically about Shakespeare’s gorgeous, funny, complicated, disturbing, and infinitely interesting work; in addition, we will consider how one “reads” film as an active and informed interpreter rather than a passive viewer. What we learn will be invaluable for our engagement with the richness and versatility of language, film, and culture.
 
During class, students will watch brief film clips rather than entire films; they will read the assigned plays and view the movies before each class meeting.

 

Required Reading:

Students are welcome to use any edition they already own; students who don't own the plays should get the following paperback single editions:

Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. Signet Classics, 1998. ISBN: 0-451-52686-4.

Shakespeare, William. Twelfth Night. Signet Classics, 1998. ISBN: 0-451-52676-7.

Shakespeare, William. Henry IV, Part 1. Signet Classics, 1998. ISBN: 0-451-52711-9.

Shakespeare, William. Henry IV, Part 2. Signet Classics, 2002. ISBN: 0-451-52853-0.

Shakespeare, William. Henry V. Signet Classics, 1998. ISBN: 0-451-52690-2.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 to 4:00 P.M. Nov. 13, 20, Dec. 4, and 11, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine Comedy, Inferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization of his hell, from lesser to greater sins, the numerous historical personages and references in it, and its implicit theology. We will also look at Dante’s narrative, discussing how the actions of his characters and their respective punishments depict the true nature of the sins.

The purpose of Dante’s voyage is not about merely observing the torments of the damned, but rather about gaining knowledge of the true nature of evil. While many contemporary readers might disagree with the categories of Dante’s sins, the question of evil is as relevant today as it was in the fourteenth century.

Required Reading:

Alighieri, Dante. The Inferno. Trans. Jean and Robert Hollander. Anchor, 2002. ISBN-13: 978-0385496988.

Professor
Tuition:
$120
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 am - 12:00 pm June 6 - June 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants from different deserts. Here the key questions will be: How do these plants grow and develop in these environments? Deserts are also associated with significant events in human history and many issues in contemporary international relations. Throughout the course we will consider humans and their influences on desert environments. We will also explore challenging questions here such as how societies perceive and steward deserts, and how are these actions connected?

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course explores the beliefs and cultures of Islam and the Muslim world. It covers the life and teachings of Muhammad, major themes of the Qur’an, and the primary differences between Sunni and Shi’i Muslims. It also introduces aspects of Muslim cultures in the Middle East and South Asia in order to demonstrate the plurality of traditions within the religion of Islam. It concludes with a review of American foreign policy in the Muslim world over the past half century and its impact on Muslim-American relations.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. November 2 - 30, 2015. No class on November 23, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Few composers have been as prolific in so many genres as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In this course we will survey a portion of this vast output from the unique perspective of specialists in the field, all professors at the University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music. The first session will be led by Jay Rosenblatt and will offer an overview of Mozart’s life, covering such topics as his years as a child prodigy, his difficulties with the prince-archbishop of Salzburg, and his final decade in Vienna. He will also introduce the class to the stylistic characteristics of Mozart’s music. For the subsequent sessions, Kristin Dauphinais, Professor of Voice, will discuss the three operas Mozart wrote with Lorenzo da Ponte; Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, will examine Mozart’s sacred music; and Tannis Gibson, Professor of Piano, will introduce us to Mozart’s piano concertos and works for solo piano.

Required Reading:

Cowdery, William and Neal Zaslaw. The Compleat Mozart: A Guide to the Musical Works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. W.W. Norton, 1990. ISBN: 0-393-02886-0.

Professor
Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This class continues the discussion of Technological Wonders of Classical Antiquity from 2016. While the 2016 course focused on pyrotechnology (pottery and bronze-casting), this course will emphasize stone working (sculpture and temple architecture). The 2016 course is NOT a prerequisite to this class:

What were the key technologies and major technical advancements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines the interrelated achievements of ancient sculpture making and temple construction. From the colossal nude males of the Archaic period to the stunning nude females of Hellenistic times, sculptors continued refining their craft to challenge both material limitations and cultural norms. The construction of such wonders as the Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis required sculptors to work closely with stonemasons, gilders, and woodworkers for over a decade — a great accomplishment of architectural expertise, artistic inspiration, and managerial skill. The coordination of such a diverse group of technical specialists spanned the social strata of Athens and produced monuments that are as iconic today as they were in antiquity.

Required Reading:

NO REQUIRED TEXTS

All readings referenced in the syllabus will be distributed will be uploaded to a secure site at Box@UA. Registered students will receive the link after they register for the course.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What’s the value of a good argument?  That question is not merely rhetorical.  For the sake of argument, we will reassess the classical opposition of rhetoric and philosophy that was first established by Plato.  Ironically, it was not Socrates’s student but a student of the Sophists who founded the humanities upon a skepticism about received truths.  In our first class we will explore the sophistic art of deliberating upon the uncertainties of civic life, and in our second we will read Plato’s highly rhetorical attacks on rhetoric.  Then we will turn to the Aristotelian works that first formalized the interrelated arts of rhetoric, politics, and ethics.  We will conclude by reviewing the Ciceronian and Christian legacies of classical rhetoric.  Throughout the course, we will explore the values of argument and the arts for putting them into action.

Required Reading:

Plato’s Gorgias and Aristotle’s Rhetoric. Ed. Joe Sachs. Focus Publishing, 2008. ISBN-10: 1585102997

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 3- May 31, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

While many people living in Tucson and its surroundings are experienced outdoor aficionados, many lack an understanding of our near neighbors--those plants and animals that live close to us in our urban environment. Certainly we can choose to ignore the flora and fauna of our desert community and function reasonably well. Our lives are enriched, however, if we take the time to develop a better understanding of our companion species. Developing this awareness/knowledge ?is the goal of this course. Using ecology, the scientific analysis and study of interactions among organisms and their environment, we will also explore how these species interrelate. Lectures will explain some basic biological principles, how deserts are defined, how our deserts align themselves, and how biological organisms connect. Finally, students will get a sampling of information about the major types of flora and fauna that live near us.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 5 - May 26, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Civil War was not only pivotal moment in American history, it was a key moment in the development of American music. Even as the war was ripping the country in half, the military was bringing together soldiers from differing ethnic and musical backgrounds. The resulting comingling of instruments, songs, and styles has been called the first recognizably “American” folk music.

This is not a history class or a music class, but rather is an examination of the connection between music, history, and place. It is a class about how a unique period of history gave birth to a new era of music and gave us songs we still sing today. So, it will be a class on American culture, exploring the roots of American folk music, why music has such an impact on us, and why we are compelled to tell stories in song.

Professor
Tuition:
$165
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 17 - November 14, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Science and technology enhance our understanding of cultural history by uniting scholars across disciplines in order to expand art historical perspectives and preserve cultural masterpieces. This course begins with an overview of the campus collections and the basic tenets of museum collections care. Guest presentations by scholars from across the University of Arizona will examine the studies of art production, materials science, and cutting-edge dating and imaging methods. In conclusion, we will review the latest in conservation technology and the issues surrounding the collecting and preservation of contemporary art today.

Required Reading:

Due to the diversity in subject matter, there are no single textbooks required for this course. Readings will uploaded to Box@UA and the link for this site will be shared with registered students in early September.

Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 23 until March 27, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Colorado Plateau is a sublime geologic province renowned for its breathtaking rock formations and landscapes. During our exploration of the Colorado Plateau, we will descend the Grand Canyon, ascend the Grand Staircase, cross the Escalante, explore Canyonlands, experience the Four Corners, absorb the Painted Desert, and ultimately complete our journey on the San Francisco Peaks. Panoramic and aerial images will aid in storytelling and help frame points of primary emphasis. Along the way we will sample some of the art, poetry, and literature inspired by the region and its human history. Moreover, we will learn about pressing environmental threats and issues related to the ethos of land use.

Required Reading:

Blakey, Ron and Wayne Ranney.  Ancient Landscapes of the Colorado Plateau. Grand Canyon Association, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-1934656037.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM September 30 - December 16, 2016. No class on November 11 and November 25.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course steps back from polls and punditry to reflect on broader historical developments. It considers women in politics, divisions between rich and poor, and ethnic minorities becoming the new majority. To deepen our analyses, we will consider writings on politics and ethics, including some that shaped the founding of the republic as well as recent research on political cognition and moral imagination. That research has brought us back to Hume’s view that “reason is a slave of the passions,” something abundantly apparent in the current campaign. Stepping back from the attack ads, we will reflect on the rhetorical dynamics of American politics, including ongoing shifts in the principal parties, the role of debates as tests of character, the evolution of media and advertising, and other factors that shape how we feel about politics.

Required Reading:

You do not need to purchase any texts. All the readings for this course are available from the links in the syllabus. Closer to the beginning of the course the instructor will be creating a webpage with easy to print versions of these readings. Students enrolled in this course will get access to this webpage when it is completed.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Odyssey gives us an adventure story of a Greek hero returning to his home in Ithaca after the Trojan War.  This could be a straightforward journey lasting three or four days at most.  But in the Odyssey the journey is expanded into a narrative of 24 books (= ancient rolls) and over a time period of ten years.  Home-coming is made into an epic theme.   The epic dimensions of this journey allow the poets to incorporate a variety of folktales of heroic encounters with nymphs of divine beauty and monsters such as only an epic hero could hope to conquer.

For the Greeks, the poem achieved a universality through its articulation best expressing the Greek ethos.  But as the poem was transmitted into Europe its universality came to seem a sublime expression of the human experience, transcending geographical, historical or political boundaries.  Science and technology have constructed for us a very different worldview than that of the Odyssey but so graphic is the Homeric imagination that the poem is as inspirational today as when it was first recorded, with an appeal to people of all cultures and ages.  It can perhaps be called the most universal poem in the world even after almost three thousand years since it was first written.
            

This four-week seminar will explore the historical, political, mythical and psychological aspects of this poem.  The first lecture will concentrate on the history and archaeology relevant to the poem.  These include both material conditions of Bronze Age and Archaic Greek culture and the poetic conditions determining the form of the poem.  The lecture will address the poetic and imaginative values that inform the cosmology of the Odyssey—the nature of the gods, the relations between gods and humans, the idea of the human being, the enigmas and mysteries of human life lived out in a terrifying but hypnotically beautiful world.
            

The following three lectures will be given to a reading of the poem in English translation, with emphasis on certain books of the poem in particular.  The second lecture will focus on the pain of nostalgia, the primary emotion of the poem.  The third lecture will focus on the mythological meanings in the adventures of Odysseus, as a journey into the unconscious, concentrating on the Cyclops, the Underworld, Circe, Calypso, Nausicaa, and also including Helen, who is an Underworld figure in her own way. The last lecture will focus on theme of recognition, especially the recognition between Odysseus and Penelope.

 

Required Reading:

Homer. The Odyssey. Trans. Albert Cook. 2nd ed. W. W. Norton & Company, 1993. ISBN-10: 0393964051.

Please note that the instructor would like all students to use the edition above as there will be discussions of specific passages. Having only one translation avoids problems when doing close readings.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, and 16, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Berlin, capital of the Weimar Republic between the two World Wars, was one of the most exciting cities in Europe--the place of the most radical experimentation in the visual and performing arts, in mass entertainment and theater, in literature and architecture. Berlin was a laboratory of modernity. While the cultural stage was vibrant and intoxicating, the celebrated roaring twenties also was haunted by the shell shock of World War I and by economic instability, social upheaval, and political turmoil. This class explores avant-garde movements like Expressionism and Dada, as well as major works like Bertolt Brecht’s innovative play Three Penny Opera and Fritz Lang’s monumental film Metropolis. In this seminar we will consider the period’s challenges to notions of art, vast social changes, and the impact of mass culture and technological developments on twentieth-century sensibilities. And we will come to see why this period still fascinates us today.

 

Required Reading:

Brecht, Berthold. The Threepenny Opera. Trans. John Willett. Penguin Classics, 2007. ISBN-13: 978-0143105169.

The additional readings will be uploaded to HSP password protected website  http://course.hsp.arizona.edu  in early January.

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 1 - June 29, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What inspired Romantic composers of the 19th century to create the significant piano works that continue to speak profoundly to today’s audiences? Throughout the Romantic era the piano and the pianist-composers who wrote for it assumed an increasingly important role in European society. These pianist-composers and virtuosi fully explored the inner depths of their imaginations, and it is perhaps in the solo piano repertoire most of all that we as listeners become privy to their most passionate and idiosyncratic work. In this course we focus on the piano works of Felix Mendelssohn, Frederic Chopin, Robert and Clara Schumann, Franz Liszt, and Johannes Brahms – pianist-composers who embodied the Romantic spirit and pursued freedom from the constraints of their predecessors. We will read composers’ letters and first-hand accounts and current research, and of course, listen to performances.

Professor Gibson will be using CDs and an electronic piano to illustrate her lectures.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October, 6, 13, 20, 27, November 3, 10, 17, December 1, 8, 15, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

"Gothic" literature, theater, and (more recently) films have been a part of Western culture for over 250 years and have presented us, in disguise, with heightened -- and sometimes lurid and monstrous -- symbols of what really haunts us as a culture in our individual, social, and cultural sub-conscious.

This course will look at how the Gothic began as a literary form in the 1760's, how and why it has changed as a mode of fiction over time, and the ways in which it draws out repressed levels of belief and feeling in our culture. By the end, we will try to answer a basic question: What is this "Gothic" phenomenon really about, and why does it keep appearing (like a ghost or vampire) in different forms right down to today?

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In order to understand modern China, we must understand the changes that have shaken its cultural foundations and profoundly transformed the country with a speed unrivaled in recent world history. The term “modern” in this sense is more than a chronological marker but a new conceptualization of the self and the world. This seminar will explore the rationalization and execution of these changes and resistance to them in modern China. The course will focus on significant moments of rupture in 20th-century history and explore their political and social implications, particularly the context of revolution and utopia. We will then examine literary reflections of this context that center on the construction of modernity and the narrative of its discontent. 

Required Reading:

Jin, Ha. Waiting: A Novel. Vintage, 2000. ISBN-10: 0375706410.

All other readings will be uploaded to the secure site Box@UA and the link will be shared with students closer to the beginning of the course.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Join anthropologist/classical archaeologist David Soren in a survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Rome. This course will highlight the major wonders of the Roman world from the 8th century B.C. to the 6th century A.D., including the historical truth behind Rome's alleged founders Romulus and Remus, the frightening demonology of the Etruscans, the remarkable seven-terraced sanctuary of Praeneste, and the unique construction of the Pantheon. Dr. Soren has recently been assigned to direct a miniseries on ancient Rome, and he will discuss highlights of his project throughout Italy. The course will proceed chronologically from the founding of Rome through the Roman Republic and Empire, and will also explore the latest evidence regarding the fall of the Roman Empire, including his own work on the role played by Plasmodium falciparum malaria and the new University of Arizona research into ancient climate change and what has been termed the decennial decimations.
 

Required Reading:

Ramage, Nancy and Andrew. Roman Art. Pearson, 2008. ISBN-10: 0136000975.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Using a facing-page translation, we will deal with the climax of Dante’s Divine Comedy.  While Inferno depicts sin and evil, and Purgatorio portrays redemption, Paradiso illustrates the possibility of transcendence.  Not only does a blessed soul understand the transcendent universe, but that person also transcends her or his fallen human nature.  In this seminar we will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, and discuss its cosmological and theological basis.  Dante’s Paradiso is the culmination of the Comedy, illustrating the perfect nature of the universe, as driven by “the love that moves the sun and other stars.”
 

Required Reading:

 Alighieri, Dante.  The Paradiso. Trans. Jean and Robert Hollander.  New York: Random House, 2008.  ISBN: 978-1400031153.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. June 1- June 22, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What were the key technologies and major technical achievements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines two crucial and interconnected industries: ceramics and bronze-working. The two crafts are often discussed separately, but in this course we will focus on their deeply rooted connections. We will examine the qualities of the raw materials used, the technological know-how of potters and bronze-smiths, the pyrotechnological principles of their kilns and furnaces, as well as the social, political, economic, and cultural milieus that promoted their breakthroughs. We will explore their workshops, toolkits, apprenticeship structures, and technological treatises by using ancient evidence (archaeological, visual, textual) as well by witnessing their enduring qualities in modern production contexts.

Professor
Tuition:
$165
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 27 - October 25, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

For over two millennia, Rome has been central in the West’s symbolic landscape and the city is still filled with the glorious hidden treasures of centuries. The humanist epigram Quanta Roma fuit ruina docet—‘Her ruins teach us how great Rome was,’ invites a study of this hidden city through different thematic lenses. We will explore the monuments but also urban design, architecture, sculpture, town planning, religion, politics, street life, and texts. We will embark upon our own Grand Tour through five itineraries, as we discover and discuss individual artists and their works, such as Bernini’s fountains and Borromini’s whirling spaces; intimate chapels and grand frescoes, like those in Santa Prassede or in the Sistine Chapel; quiet piazzas and talking statues; papal anecdotes and neighborhood festivals; and the films and literature that inspire us to experience Rome both as a material place and as an idea.

Required Reading:

1. James, Henry. Daisy Miller: Any text (on-line or hard copy) is fine.

2. Wharton, Edith. Roman Fever: Any text (on-line or hard copy) is fine.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 24 until April 4, 2014 (no class on March 21)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In this cultural excursion we will explore literary and artistic highlights of the diverse cultures that have flourished in the concise landmass of ancient Anatolia (modern Turkey) —Paleolithic and Neolithic habitation, Hittites, Amazons, Assyrians, Hebrew Biblical, Troy, Phrygia, Lydia, Lycia, Ionian Greeks, Roman, early Christian, Byzantine, Ottoman. Textbooks provide historical background; and art, architecture, poetry, philosophy, and other writings offer insights into the distinctive qualities that make these cultures memorable and still fascinating. The diverse values and creative expressions show the various ways human societies have addressed issues we still grapple with: gender identity, humans’ place in the world, relationship with the gods, and more. An exciting, illuminating exploration!
 

Required Reading:

Stoneman, Richard. A Traveller's History of Turkey. 5th ed. N.Y: Interlink Pub. Group, 2009. ISBN: 978-1566566-209.

Additional readings will be made available on the course materials link during the semester.

Tuition:
$225.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. AND THURSDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. January 12 - March 2, 2017.
Environmental and Natural Resources Building 2 (ENR2), Room N120
Past Course

This spring students of all ages will have the exciting opportunity to learn about and discuss politics with one of the greatest public intellectuals of our time, Noam Chomsky. Chomsky and UA emeritus professor Marv Waterstone will coteach a seven-week class titled “What Is Politics?” that is both a general education course for UA undergraduates and a Humanities Seminar class for community members. Connecting students from multiple generations and political outlooks, this course is sure to stimulate ideas, debate, and dialogue.

The course examines industrial state capitalism as the dominant organizing principle of our economy. Throughout the course students will interrogate the consequences of this orientation, including threats to the human species such as climate change, potential nuclear terrorism, and the expansion of militarism and warfare. These consequences also encompass the less spectacular, but nevertheless devastating, effects of globalization and unfettered capitalism on social inequality. At the heart of the class students will explore possible responses and resistances to these phenomena, and will investigate the achievements and difficulties involved with agitating for progressive change.

What You Need to Know

Where:  Environmental and Natural Resources Building 2 (ENR2), Room N120.  This room is a large auditorium.  It is wheelchair accessible and has an assisted listening system.

Parking: The Sixth Street Garage is immediately east of the classroom building.  The garage is on the south side of the campus between Park and Highland Avenues. The hourly charge is $2 before 5 PM and $1 after 5 PM.

Tuesday Class Overview:  The Tuesday lectures will be conducted by Professor Waterstone and will present a theoretical, conceptual, and historical contextualization of the week's topic.

Thursday Class Overview:  Professor Chomsky will use concrete examples (mostly drawn from the news to provide "real life" lenses) to illustrate the concepts articulated on Tuesday, after which there will be a Q & A with Professor Chomsky and a UA faculty expert on that particular topic.

Reading and Syllabus:  Detailed reading assignments and a finalized syllabus will be available closer to the beginning of the course.  The readings for adult students can be accessed online in early January.  Printed material will not be available.

REGISTRATION FOR THIS CLASS ONLY begins on Thursday, November 17, at 8 AM and continues throughout the registration period until the class is full.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 until noon October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 11, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) or "The Good Fight," as was it was commonly called on the left, was democracy's first major confrontation with fascism. Its indelible mark on Spain and on the international community is still felt today.  This course will look at the war, its impact and rich international intellectual legacy. The examination of the war will begin with a consideration of it from the Spanish perspective, uncovering the deep tensions in Spanish society and politics that led up to the armed conflict. From there our analysis will move to the conflict's prosecution and the war's effects on Spanish civil society and on modern warfare. The Diaspora that took place in the wake of the war was one of the most significant in a continuing series of exiles unleashed by fratricidal conflicts around the globe and our study of the war will also take this into consideration. We will then look at the internationalization of the conflict as future adversaries in the Second World War took sides with either the duly elected republican government in Spain or the military insurgents led, eventually, by Francisco Franco. How Spain's turn from dictatorship to democracy became a model for democratic restoration around the world will conclude our historical analysis of the conflict and its results.

Our reading material will be drawn from some of classic studies of the Spanish society and the war including Gerald Brennan's The Spanish Labyrinth, and studies of the war and its aftermath by Hugh Thomas, Gabriel Jackson, Sir Raymond Carr and Paul Preston as well as Noam Chomsky’s seminal analysis of anarchism's key role in the war. We will tease out the international aspects of the war through an examination of Orwell's autobiographical reflections, Nolte’s compelling analysis of fascism and Rouse's study of the failed strategy of appeasement. From the moment the battle lines were drawn the Spanish Civil War galvanized the intellectual imagination of a vast array of international cultural creators including writers, film makers, visual artists and musicians. Our analysis of "The Good Fight" will necessarily be interspersed with a consideration of them and with a reflection on the unending tensions between art and politics. Among the works to be examined are Picasso’s Guernica and the British filmmaker Ken Loach’s Land and Freedom.
 

Required Reading:

Graham, Helen. The Spanish Civil War: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. ISBN: 978-0-19-280377-1.

Professor
Tuition:
$150.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, March 2, 9, 23, 30, April 6, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Dance—as Homer named it—is always an expression of the ideas, traditions, and values of the society that creates it, whether spiritual, recreational, or artistic in form. The body in motion is both the mode of expression and the meaning of the Dance. In this course we explore the correlations between the body image as defined by science, the self image as described by psychology, and the human image as expressed in our dances. In the process we refer to the styles of depicting the human body in motion in visual art and literature through history and view a range of dance styles from Balanchine to Bausch and from ballroom to break dancing. The objective of the course is to enhance our viewing pleasure of the Dance in its thousand forms and styles.

Professor
Tuition:
$135
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 pm August 4 - September 1, 2017
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Past Course

ATTEND THE INAUGURAL COURSE IN ORO VALLEY

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed.  Such approaches will bring into focus the education of the main characters through the trials of their experiences. While the novels conform to the comedic mode, in which the principals ultimately realize their destinies as well-married men and women, their education displays the hazards, if not the flaws, of society and humanity. These are some of the ways in which Austen reworks the Bildungsroman formula to create narratives of poise, wit, and artistic seriousness. It is little wonder that Austen has long been regarded as the originator of the “great tradition” of the English novel.

Required Reading:

 

Jane Austen. Emma. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1998. ISBN-10: 0486406482.  ISBN-13: 978-0486406480.

__________. Pride and Prejudice. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1995. ISBN-10:  0486284735. ISBN-13: 978-0486284736.

____________. Sense and Sensibility. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1995. ISBN-10: 0486290492.  ISBN-13: 978-0486290492.

All three texts are paperback editions. 

 

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course will give students an understanding of how the Earth’s climate changes naturally, as well as how humans are driving this change. We will explore what is likely to happen in the future, resulting both from natural change and change driven by the human-caused rise of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and other influences. We’ll cover the physical climate system, how it interacts with water, landscapes and ecosystems, and what the options are for dealing with the change, both in terms of adaptation and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Although the course will steer clear of the politics of climate change, we will deal with scientific misconceptions and misunderstandings that commonly emerge in the public debate about climate change. Our geographic focus will be global, with a special emphasis on the US, and in particular, the Southwest.

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 24 through April 4, 2018 (no class March 7)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course explores the emergence of freedom as an ideal in Africa during and after the movements for national liberation. We will examine the people’s ongoing struggle to achieve social justice after colonial independence as a quest for meaningful freedom. To understand the emergence of this ideal and the nature of the people’s struggle, we will consider complex narratives (film, fiction) of major importance and read social theory (history, economics, sociology). The seminar’s scope is pan-African and covers the historical period of the 1950s to the present day. Areas of particular narrative interest include introspective gaze and intimate self, gender dynamics, national experience, globalization, and spirituality.

Required Reading:

Armah, Ayi Kwei. Fragments. Heinemann, 1995. ISBN: 978-0435901547. or  Per Ankh edition, 2006. ISBN: 978-2911928109. Either edition will work.

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. Purple Hibiscus: A Novel.  Algonquin Books; reprint 2012.  ISBN: 978-1616202415.

Tansi, Sony Labou. Life and a Half: A Novel. Indiana UP, 2011. ISBN: 978-0253222879. 

Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart. Penguin, 1994. ISBN: 978-0385474542.

Other readings will be uploaded to Box@UA the link of which will be shared with registered students. 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. (Henry IV, Part 2)

Of his ten histories, the four interrelated plays forming the second tetralogy are among Shakespeare's greatest theatrical achievements. These works, which deal with the period of 1400 to 1420, include Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2, and Henry V. They feature a rich variety of characters: the tragic Richard II, the ruthlessly ambitious and ultimately remorseful Henry IV, the heroic Henry V, and the brilliantly comic Falstaff. The plays focus on some of the enduring political questions: the transference of power from one reign or government to another, the establishment of political legitimacy, the limits of power, and the inscrutability of historical forces. But they also deal with intensely human experiences and psychology—personal loyalties, family relationships, growing up and growing old, and the solitariness of political leadership.
 

Required Reading:

Any well-edited and annotated edition of the plays will suffice. The instructor will use The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G.B. Evans (1989). The four plays average approximately 3,200 lines and should require three to five hours of reading per week.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 7 - June 28, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Sherlock Holmes never actually said “Elementary, my dear Watson!” There have been more than 60 Holmes films, including one in which he is portrayed by a mouse, one by a dog, and at least one as a woman. Arthur Conan Doyle, the original author, was a medical doctor, a freemason, and a believer in spiritualism and clairvoyance. These and other curious facts will be explored (or should we say “detected“?) in this seminar, as we examine a cross-section of the many adaptations of Doyle’s iconic detective. We will begin by reading many of the original short stories, followed by viewing film and television versions of Holmes, and ending with a smattering of fan fiction and popular-culture revisions of the Holmes character. Along the way we will consider how Sherlock Holmes changes over time and in different cultural moments. What is the enduring power of this mysterious figure, Sherlock Holmes?

Required Reading:

Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. The Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Ed. Ed Glinert. Penguin Classics, 2001. ISBN-10: 0140437711.

---.  A Study in Scarlet. Penguin Classics, 2001. ISBN-10: 0140439080.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In four sessions we will look at works of art music from each of the decades of the latter half of the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the act and art of listening, and how to know what to listen for. We will explore the qualities of the music itself and strategies of understanding the music, bringing us deeper satisfaction and appreciation, and thus giving us a stronger relationship to the greatness expressed by the soul and mind of genius. Some works and composers will be familiar to you and some not: Copland, Bernstein, Messiaen, Brown, Stockhausen, Ligeti, Lutoslawski, Rzewski and Takemitsu, Berio, Adams, and Asia.

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24 - April 4, 2017. No class on March 14.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In this course we’ll explore Homer’s brilliant storytelling in The Odyssey: his tales of Odysseus’s struggles to return home after the Trojan War. While the poem highlights the hero’s fantastic adventures, the underlying meanings reflect profound social concerns: female and male identities, and their respective realms and relationships; revisiting The Iliad’s military-centered notions of heroism from social-oriented perspectives; the roles of gods; storytelling traditions, and more. The class looks at how these diverse tales interweave to create Odysseus’s story, his journey, and the challenges he must face to become the worthy husband, father, son, and man of society praised by the poem. Appreciating ancient Greek views on these perennially important themes provides valuable insights into our own ideas about these complex social issues, and why this engaging ancient poem continues to influence our contemporary thinking and creativity

 

 

 

Required Reading:

Homer. The Odyssey. Trans. Charles Stein. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-1556437281.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will examine mysterious moments, ancient and modern, which have come to the fore in humanity’s quest to understand our place in the cosmos.
 
We begin in prehistory, where from the oldest humans we have evidence of sophisticated astronomy.   How much did the earliest sky-watchers discover the motions of the heavens?  What did they record in stone for us to decipher?  We will study archaeoastronomical monuments in Europe and America to try to place ourselves in the minds of the earliest astronomers.  From there we will turn to ancient Greek astronomy and its philosophical background.  We will study some of the miracle-workers among the Greeks, their computers and steam engines, and their amazing leaps of deduction and model-building which placed Western astronomical thought on a solid foundation.
 
Returning to the present, we ask: Are threats from space imaginary or real?  What are the dangers from near-Earth asteroids, gamma ray bursts, supernovae, and solar flares?  We will examine the actual dangers presented by physical phenomena from space.  Closer to Earth, we examine environmental issues connected to orbital debris, back contamination, and the ethics of terraforming.  Then we survey recent results from Lunar and Martian investigations.  Reviewing the continuing progress of astrobiology and the search for life beyond Earth, we consider prospects for discovering life on Titan and Europa.
 
We will learn how to find an exoplanet--from radial velocity and astrometry to transits and gravitational microlensing.  The amazing results of the Kepler mission will be examined.  SETI will be reconsidered – what does the current flood of exoplanet detections do to the “traditional” search for extra-terrestrial intelligence?  Finally we examine the latest findings concerning the large-scale shape and structure of the universe.  We join the discussion in quantitative cosmology about the big bang, dark matter, black holes, the expansion of clusters of galaxies, and the acceleration of expansion.  We consider the cosmological case for other universes.  All together, these mysterious moments will give us a cosmic perspective on the human search for meaning in the universe.

Required Reading:

Hoskin, Michael (ed).  The Cambridge Concise History of Astronomy. Cambridge University Press, 1999. ISBN: 0-521-57600-8.

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 16 - November 13, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course surveys the music of Ludwig van Beethoven from the perspectives of different professors at the Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt begins with an overview of Beethoven’s life: his youth in Bonn, the reasons for his move to Vienna, and the outline of his early, middle, and late style periods. He will also introduce the stylistic characteristics of Beethoven’s music. Subsequent sessions will be led by Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, who will consider Beethoven’s sacred music, particularly the Missa Solemnis; Thomas Cockrell, Director of Orchestral Activities, who will discuss Beethoven’s symphonies; John Milbauer, Professor of Piano, who will focus on Beethoven’s late piano work; and Tim Kantor, Assistant Professor of Violin, who will examine Beethoven’s chamber music from the perspective of a professional string quartet member.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Rome survives despite nearly 3,000 years of invasions by Sabines, Gauls, Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, Normans, Napoleon, Hitler, and mass tourism.  In this course we will visit Rome, interwoven in texts and art, from antiquity through the twentieth century. We will complement our reading selections from diaries, guidebooks, poetry, fiction, and history with film clips and discussion.

Beginning with its foundation on the Palatine Hill and continuing through the design of Mussolini’s Fascist Square, we will reflect on “the city that becomes to all a second native land by predilection and not by accident of birth alone,” to which “all roads lead.”  

Petrarch, the father of humanism, visited Rome for the first time in 1341, when he was already a famous poet. That year, on April 8, he stood on the Capitoline Hill as he was crowned poet laureate, the first to be so honored since antiquity.  In his account of the occasion he wrote, “I do not wonder that Rome conquered the world, but only that it took so much time.”

Join the many pilgrims who have experienced Rome’s immortal lights in her renaissances and revolutions throughout history, as Marion Crawford described them:

 “A man can no more say a last farewell to Rome than he can take leave of eternity.  The years move on, but she waits; the cities fall, but she stands; the old races of men lie dead in the track wherein mankind wanders always between two darknesses; yet Rome lives and her changes are not from life to death, as ours are, but from one life to another.” Ave Roma Immortalis (1898)
    

RECOMMENDED READING:

Hibbert, Christopher. Rome: The Biography of a City. Penguin, 1995. ISBN: 0140070781.

The UA Bookstore will not be able to order this text as it is now officially out of print. However, according to bookfinder.com, there are still lots of internet sites that sell this text. Please try any of these sites to purchase a copy, or check the local bookstores.

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course brings together six distinguished scholars from the College of Humanities to explore movements of social resistance and revolution. Malcolm Alan Compitello, Professor and Head of Spanish and Portuguese, examines the Spanish Civil War as a crucial moment whose social and cultural impact is still felt today. Alain-Philippe Durand, Dean of the College, explores how wars and revolutions shape Jean Renoir’s 1930s films. Albert Welter, Professor and Head of East Asian Studies, focuses on the role that revolution has played in China’s 4,000-year history. Praise Zenenga, Associate Professor and Director of Africana Studies, addresses the important and multifaceted antiapartheid revolution in South Africa. Denis M. Provencher, Professor and Head of French and Italian, explores how North African immigrants to France resist and ultimately reshape narratives of national identity. Finally, Karen K. Seat, Associate Professor and Head of Religious Studies and Classics, will examine the sexual revolution of the 1960s and the rise of the religious right’s counterrevolution in the United States.

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 1 until December 17, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Who are the Turks? Where did they come from, and how did they help build the Islamic world? What role did they play in the Crusades? A major world power for nearly 500 years, how did they rule so much of Europe before finally taking Constantinople in 1453, and with what consequences?

More recently, what role have Turks--both Ottomans and post-Ottomans--played in modern history? As the "Sick Man of Europe" for most of the 19th century, they provided fuel for the western imagination in literature, architecture, food, and fashion--not to mention wars. The dismantling of their empire created the current map (and many of the current problems) of the Middle East. Where are Turkey and the modern Turks headed as we approach two centuries since modern Turkey emerged?

Please note that due to popular demand this past spring this class is brought back in the fall of 2013.
 

Required Reading:

Goodwin, Jason.  The Janissary Tree. Picador, 2007. ISBN:  978-0-312-42613-2 

Pope, Hugh.  Sons of the Conquerors: The Rise of the Turkic World. Overlook TP, 2006. ISBN:  978-1585678044  

Shafak, Elif.  The Bastard of Istanbul. Penguin Books, 2008. ISBN:  978-0143112716   

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS June 29 - July 27, 2016 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes has undoubtedly profoundly influenced the techniques, form, and meaning of modern art. From his innovations that revolutionized making etchings to the form and content of his historical and allegorical painting, Goya’s influence on artistic creation is immense. This course will study that influence and examine how Goya’s view of the world and his thought emerged. We will see how his paintings and etchings evolved into a systematic criticism of the antiquated nature of Spain’s institutions and way of life. We will also explore how Napoleon’s invasion of Spain provoked a crisis in Goya’s thinking and painting, and how his growing physical infirmity and conflicts with the state affected his innovative later work, including the enigmatic black paintings. The course will also examine the Goya's influence on subsequent generations of artists.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Bleak House is often said to be Dickens’s greatest novel; certainly it is one of his most compelling and enjoyable. We will spend four intense and rewarding weeks reading this masterpiece in its original installments, paying close attention to themes of loss, law, social class, secrecy, and inheritance. We will also explore Dickens’s astonishing use of language by way of close reading. Two critical lenses will guide us: the historical view and a psychological perspective. In addition to what I hope will be a lively discussion of the material, we will examine relevant materials from the period.

Required Reading:

Dickens, Charles. Bleak House. Ed. Patricia Ingham. Broadview Press, 2010. ISBN-10: 1551119315; ISBN-13: 978-1551119311.

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will concentrate on eight of Shakespeare's comedies, among them Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. The approach will assume that comedy is a genre distinguished not by light-hearted humor or triviality but by structure of plot. The action moves from conflict and separation to resolution and union, and the plays typically end in betrothal or marriage. But whatever its romance, Shakespeare's comedy is serious and psychologically realistic. The plays explore the hazards of human relationships and the perils of commitment. Ultimately it is the comic heroine's deep awareness of herself and the world that make possible the realization of the romantic ideal—if only within the confines of the play. Throughout the seminar analysis of the texts of the plays will be supplemented with video clips of their productions. 

Required Reading:

Shakespeare, William.  As You Like It.  Edited by Frances E. Dolan, Penguin Books, 2000.  ISBN: 978-0140714715.

---. Cymbeline. Edited by Peter Holland, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714722.

--- . Measure for Measure. Edited by Jonathan Crewe, Stephen Orgel, and A. R. Braunmuller, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714791.

--- . The Merchant of Venice. Edited by A. R. Braunmuller, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714623.

--- . A Midsummer Night's Dream. Edited by Russ McDonald, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714555.

--- . Richard III. Edited by Peter Holland and Stephen Orgel, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714838.

--- . The Tempest. Edited by Peter Holland, Penguin Books, 1999. ISBN: 978-0140714852.

--- . Twelfth Night. Edited by Jonathan V. Crewe, Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0140714890.

--- . The Winter's Tale. Edited by Frances E. Dolan, Penguin Books, 1999. ISBN: 978-0140714883.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course examines the fundamental issues and theories surrounding the art production and reception of Modern Art in Europe and America through the twentieth century. Framed by discussions of Post-Impressionist painting of the 1880s and the Post-Modern pluralist art of the 1980s, we will examine how theories of human nature, art, and spirituality informed the creation and interpretation of painting, sculpture, architecture and mixed-media works in their specific cultural, social and political arenas. This class will trace two major tendencies in Modern Art in a basically chronological fashion: first, abstraction from nature or “reality” to locate an objective essence of form and vision in artworks from Cubism, Purism, Futurism, De Stijl, Bauhaus, Minimalism and Pop; second the more subjective and romantic “turning within” that constitutes the artworks and theories of Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, and Neo-Expressionism.  

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Because insects account for more than half of all described species and have profound effects on our history and culture, knowledge of their contributions and influences is important. Ecologically, insects provide tremendous benefits and equally daunting challenges. They provide critical biological services in pollination, natural products, pest-population regulation, and human nutrition. Insects are also our chief competitors for food, and act as parasites and vectors of human disease, the source of much human misery. The impacts of insects on humans, both positive and negative, are also reflected in music, literature, art, and entertainment. In this class we will explore the diverse ways in which the lives of insects and humans are intertwined.

Specific topics we will address include: entomophagy (eating insects), entomophobia (fear of insects), insects in literature, insects in the movies, insect services and products, insects as totems, silk, and venomous insects.

Arizona’s general public seems to have a love/hate relationship with insects (and other arthropods) of all sorts. A survey conducted in Arizona revealed only 6% of participants enjoyed insects found outdoors (only 0.7% took pleasure in finding them inside their homes). A very small segment of US society, however, experiences a genuine neurosis related to arthropods. Most scholars think concern over insects is societally based since these beliefs are associated with Western European culture. Relationships between humans and arthropods in other parts of the world are dramatically different. As an example, entomophagy is commonly practiced in those parts of the world with scant protein resource. In western culture, however, most are repulsed by the idea of eating insects. It is odd that we eagerly consume scavenging lobsters and eschew plant-feeding grasshoppers. We will explore the reasons for this and other culturalinconsistencies.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 1- December 10, 2015. No class on November 26, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What was the relationship of ancient Greek culture to early Christianity? This seminar will open with two topics of significance in the early development of Christianity: the image (or icon) and the Jesus story itself. The course will also include lectures on the tragic paradigm in Greek poetry (Homer and Sophocles) and a discussion of the soul in Plato's Phaedo. Then we trace the Hellenization of the ancient Mediterranean, beginning with the conquests of Alexander the Great and their influence on the diffusion of Hellenic philosophy and culture. We will also discuss the Logos in the Gospel of John, as well as how the Apostle Paul fits into ancient Epicureanism. The seminar will conclude with the conversion of the Emperor Constantine and the Council of Nicaea, and examine the fusion of Judaism and Platonism in the formation of the Nicene Creed in 325 CE.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 2, 9, 16, 23, 2018
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Past Course

Professor Smith brings his popular June 2017 course to Oro Valley!

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants from different deserts. Here the key questions will be: How do these plants grow and develop in these environments? Deserts are also associated with significant events in human history and many issues in contemporary international relations. Throughout the course we will consider humans and their influences on desert environments. We will also explore challenging questions here such as how societies perceive and steward deserts, and how are these actions connected?

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 4 until December 13, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

John Milton was one of England’s most controversial, celebrated, and reviled writers. As the course title suggests, we will study Milton’s poetry and prose within the context of the many revolutions in which he was a major figure: revolutions in politics, theology, poetics, and philosophy. One of our goals will be to examine not only how Milton–and the culture in which he was embedded–constructed meaning but also why it is important for us to undertake such an examination. We will read works from many of the different genres in which Milton wrote: sonnets, epic (Paradise Lost), masque, polemical prose tracts, pastoral elegy, etc. We will also consider the richly generative contradictions that informed both the author’s oeuvre and his character. With careful attention to textual analysis, students will share Milton’s engagement with the complexity and versatility of language, literature, and culture.
 

Required Reading:

Milton, John. The Major Works. Eds. Stephen Orgel and Jonathan Goldberg. Oxford UP, 2008. ISBN: 0199539189.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS July 7 - July 28, 2016 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In this course Professor David Soren presents four of his most significant accomplishments from his fifty-year career in archaeology (Oxford University has cited his work as among the fifty greatest archaeological discoveries of all time). First, he will discuss his excavations at Kourion, Cyprus, where he uncovered a Greco-Roman city buried by the devastating earthquake of July 21, 365, which triggered tsunamis so powerful they demolished the Greek coast. Next, he will tell the story of the agony of Roman emperor Augustus, which caused him to go with the poet Horace to an exotic spa in Tuscany. Then, he will reveal the Carthaginians, whose general Hannibal became a name that still inspires terror in today’s world. Finally, Dr. Soren will analyze factors that hastened the fall of Rome, as he presents his new work with the Yale Biomedical Anthropology team about the spread of malaria across ancient Italy.

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The detective tale, born of the work of Edgar Alan Poe and altered by Dashiell Hammett,  evolved over time in the hands of international masters such as Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Andrea Camilleri, and Donna Leon. Our examination helps identify the qualities that provide this genre with its enduring allure, and explores how modern practitioners play with the form and adapt it to the writer’s needs in ways that continue to fuel reader interest. Through the reading of the required primary texts and important recommended secondary texts and through the seminar's "investigation" of the genre we will come to a new appreciation of how the most representative of formulaic fiction broke out of its mold and garnered wide critical appreciation and the loyalty of millions of readers worldwide.

Required Reading:
  • Vazquez Montalban, Manuel. Southern Seas. Trans. Patrick Camiller. Melville International Crime, 2012. ISBN: 1612191177.
  • Camilleri, Andrea. The Terra-Cotta Dog. Trans. Stephen Sartarelli. Penguin Books, 2005. ISBN: 0142004723.
  • Leon, Donna. Death at La Fenice. Harper Perennial, 2004. ISBN: 006074068X.
Tuition:
$155.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 25 - April 5, 2017. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Set decorators call it the art of silent storytelling--how art direction and production design (everything on screen) establish and convey character and story. We examine this “narrative space” through three topics. “Life Stories” that range from personal to epic: class relations in WWI prisoner of war camps (Jean Renoir, La Grande Illusion); a father-daughter relationship in 1960s Japan (Yasuhiro Ozu, An Autumn Afternoon); and ethnicity in Paris suburbs (Mathieu Kassovitz, La Haine). “Meditations on Landscape” explores the Australian outback (Warwick Thornton, Samson and Delilah); French legionnaires in East Africa (Claire Denis, Beau Travail); and politics and astronomy in Chile’s Atacama desert (Patricio Guzman, Nostalgia for the Light). “Suspense” examines early Alfred Hitchcock (The Man Who Knew Too Much); film noir (Otto Preminger, Laura); and vague uneasiness (Atom Egoyan, Felicia’s Journey). Film theory provides additional avenues for evaluating and enhancing the cinematic experience.‌

The course tuition of $155.00 includes a $5.00 fee from the University so that students can access and stream the movies discussed on their computers.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

After 2500 years, Ancient Greek Drama still fascinates modern audiences. In this course students will explore the interactions between the ancient and modern. By reading ancient Greek plays or poems and reading or viewing a modern play or film based on the ancient, students will discuss the themes and ideas prevalent in the ancient, how these are treated in the modern versions, and why these ancient themes still appeal to dramatists, cinematographers and their audiences. The modern versions are selected for the thought-provoking perspectives they provide on their ancient forerunners. These will include selections from Homer’s Iliad, Sophocles’ Oedipus cycle and Euripides’ Medea and Hippolytus (featuring Phaedra), and modern dramatic or cinematic renditions by Anouilh, Marcel Camus, Dassin, Pasolini, Peterson and Wise. 
 

Required Reading:

Homer. The Iliad.  Trans. Stanley Lombardo. Hackett Pub. Co., 1997. ISBN: 0-87220-352-2.
Sophocles. Theban Plays. Trans. Peter Meineck. Hackett Pub. Co., 2003. ISBN: 0-87220-585-1.
Euripides. Iphigeneia at Aulis. Trans. W.S. Merwin and G.E. Dimock Jr. Oxford University Press, 1992. ISBN: 0-19-507709-1.
Euripides. Medea. Trans. Robin Robertson. Free Press, 2009. ISBN: 1416592253.
There will also be a FastCopy package of copied materials for sale through the UA Bookstore shortly before the beginning of the seminar.

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2017. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Biology has well-supported insights into how animals make decisions and why they behave the way they do, in contexts from foraging to cooperation. This knowledge is grounded in theory as well as empirical evidence. Generally these insights also apply to humans: humans evolved, and thus their brain as well as their preferences, capabilities, and learning abilities are all the result of natural selection, as they are for any other animal. What consequences does this have for our understanding of how people behave when shopping, budgeting time, parenting, loving, or hating? In this course, we will cover how biologists arrived at their conclusions about animals and discuss how they apply to humans. We will also talk about psychological research and controversies in this area, and what, if anything, differentiates humans from other animals (intelligence, cultural evolution, free will?). Do any of these research findings change our conclusions? 

Required Reading:

All readings will be provided by the instructor as pdf files and will be uploaded to Box@UA. Registered students will receive a link to the uploaded readings by early September.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Clearly, Nobel laureates have made major creative contributions to world literature and to international reception of emerging nations’ literary arts.   This course will expose students to movements in 20th-century world literature by reading Nobel laureates. Global modernism, as shown by influences shared among these laureates, combines Western and non-Western styles, traditions, and modes of expression.  This class will emphasize the relationship of modern world literature to traditional arts, performance, and ritual.

Formal categories and genres will be approached in terms of their relationship to cultural issues and ethnic history.   Students will discover how poetry, fiction, and drama reflect prevailing social forces and national histories.  Showing the interdependence of cultural rituals, folklore traditions, mythic beliefs, and culturally based aesthetics will enable students to employ new formal categories and vocabularies.

The course concludes with a work by the latest laureate, who is announced in early October.  The students and the instructor will read that new work together and utilize critical techniques and apply cultural analyses developed during the semester.

Required Reading:

Faulkner, William.  Selected Short Stories. Modern Library, 1993. ISBN: 978-0679424789 ..
   
Lagerkvist, Par. Barabbas. Trans. Alan Blair. Vintage, 1989. ISBN: 978-0679725442 .
         
Neruda, Pablo. Selected Poems. Trans. Ben Belitt. Grove, 1994. ISBN: 978-0802151025

Soyinka, Wole.  Collected Plays 2. Oxford, 1975. ISBN: 978-0192811646

Oe, Kenzaburo.  A Personal Matter. Trans. John Nathan. Grove, 1994. ISBN: 978-0802150615

Szymborska, Wislawa.  Poems New and Collected. Mariner Books, 2000. ISBN: 978-0156011464

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 2, 9, 16, 23
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will examine the social movements that came to the fore in the year that began with the Tet Offensive and ended with the launch around the moon. The first three classes will examine the antiwar, civil rights, and women’s movements using images and texts to consider what the ‘60s came to represent. In our last class we will consider how the divisions between the counterculture and “moral majority” led to the election of Richard Nixon—and to the antigovernment sentiments that have spread from left to right in recent decades. In the last class we will also examine the environmental movement as a final case to reflect upon how our political consciousness has evolved over the last half-century as guerilla wars have continued to rage on the evening news, minorities and women have struggled to claim their rights, and our sense of self has become ever more mediated.    

Required Reading:

Readings will be provided closer to the beginning of the course. They will be uploaded to a virtual site at Box@UA, the link of which will be shared with all registered students.

Professor
Tuition:
$150.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon October 2 until December 11, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will take students through a reading of the whole of Homer’s Iliad.  The first two weeks will be devoted to historical conditions around the work, including discussion of the nature of oral composition and aesthetic aspects of oral epic.  The remaining eight weeks will be devoted to a consecutive reading of the poem, with the focus on such issues as the relations between the gods and human beings, between one human being and another, the making of the hero, destiny, choice, free will, and the tragic consequences of a human individual’s choices.
 
 

Required Reading:

Homer. The Iliad. Trans. Robert Fagles. Penguin Classics, 1998. ISBN: 0140275363.

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 2 - August 30, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar will focus on the ideal political state as it is represented in More's Utopia (1516) and Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726). There are no incontrovertibly valid answers to the question of what constitutes the ideal state and how it may be realized, and neither Utopia nor Gulliver Travels pretends to advance them. The works are fictional, and the methods are literary—a Platonic dialogue and a prose satire. Each work advances two arguments, one that affirms the ideal political state and the other that rejects its possibility. Neither author endorses one argument over the other. The result is ironic detachment and openness rather than closure. Such openness and irony may not admit of concrete proposals for reform, but they do provide for a searching inquiry into the ideal political state and the capacity of humans achieve it.

Required Reading:
  • More, Thomas. Utopia. Dover Thrift Editions, 1997. ISBN-13: 978-0486295831.
  • Swift, Jonathan. Gulliver’s Travels. Penguin Classics, 2003. ISBN-13: 978-0141439495.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$ 85.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Join University of Arizona Regents Professor David Soren for a survey of the life and work of four great directors. First up is Fritz Lang whose collaboration with wife Thea Von Harbou led to the recently fully rediscovered science fiction epic Metropolis. Next the enigmatic Busby Berkeley is featured, stressing his importance as a creator of the Hollywood musical look of the 1930s and showing some of his lesser known but still amazing work, including the kaleidoscopic color images of The Gang's All Here, with Alice Faye. Alfred Hitchcock's dialectic follows, illustrating the evolution of his style from German silent films of the 1920s to his British period and finally on to his American triumphs of the 1950s. Finally, the Canadian musician and filmmaker Loreena McKennitt, a long-time friend of Dr. Soren, will be discussed, featuring her work as a modern Pre-Raphaelite and Romantic, and her unusual video style for songs such as The Mummer's Dance.
 

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 27 to April 7, 2017. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Turkey, one of the world’s most populous Muslim-majority countries, is a member of NATO and has tried to enter the European Union for over ten years. Since 2002 the country has undergone rapid and profound changes under the rule of the Justice and Development Party and its leader Tayyip Erdogan. These changes include a growth-oriented economy, massive infrastructural investment, softening of the country’s secularist ideology, a transformed foreign policy oriented toward economic and political engagement, and in recent years controversial steps often described as “authoritarian” by observers inside and outside the country. But what is “really going on” in Turkey? How might we understand where Turkey is heading? This course explores the contemporary history, culture, economy, and politics of Turkey to help answer those questions through lectures by Professor Silverstein and other UA experts on Turkey.

Required Reading:

Hanioglu, Sükrü. Atatürk: An Intellectual Biography. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2013. ISBN-13: 978-0691157948.

Öktem, Kerem. Turkey Since 1989: Angry Nation (Global History of the Present). Zed Books, 2011. ISBN-13: 978-1848132115.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

When Oliver Wendell Holmes declared that “the life of the law has not been logic; it has been experience,” he meant that law is a messy and imperfect invention reflecting the human condition.  This course will explore the imperfect nature of law today by focusing on cutting edge contemporary problems in legal interpretation and policy, with each covered by a distinguished faculty member from the College of Law, who is a well-known expert in the field.  Four distinguished faculty members from the College of Law will lecture on an area within the faculty member’s expertise.
 
The Challenge of Effective Regulation
Professor Barak Orbach

One of the most controversial topics during the 2012 elections will be regulation: healthcare regulation, financial regulation, environmental regulation, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and other forms of regulation.  Many people have very strong views about important regulatory matters, such as the healthcare reform and the Dodd-Frank Act. What is regulation? Why is it such a controversial topic? Do we need regulation? If so, what kind of regulation? In our meeting, we will discuss paradoxes and nuances in perceptions of regulation and the economy. More specifically, we will address some of the general principles of good governance and some concerns regarding the political culture in the United States.
 
Are There 4th Amendment Rights When The Remedy (Exclusion) Disappears?
Vice Dean Marc Miller

When should relevant evidence be excluded from a criminal trial? The remedy of exclusion is mentioned nowhere in the federal or state constitutions; it emerged in the 20th century; it is disappearing in the 21st. Should we care? Are there (now) any plausible alternatives?  This lecture will use two court decisions to illustrate the trend to limit the exclusionary rule out of existence.  The lecture will then explore whether alternatives have, or could have, protected the 4th Amendment and analogous states rights.
 
From Pocahontas to Kokopelli:  Borrowing from Native Cultures
Professor Melissa L. Tatum

All cultures change and develop, often by borrowing from other cultures.  While cultural borrowing is natural, it can be done in both appropriate and inappropriate ways.  This seminar will focus on the borrowing of Native cultures' stories, songs, symbols, images, and art, and will explore when such borrowing is acceptable and when it is not.  Examples include:
•  The State of New Mexico's use of the Zia Sun Symbol on the State flag
•  The use of American Indians as sports mascots
•  Film and TV portrayals of Indians           
• The incorporation of Native religious practices into New Age religions
 
Holmes and His Critics:  A Discussion of Freedom of Speech Rhetoric Doctrine, and Reality
Professor Toni M. Massaro

Americans assume they have broad first amendment protection, often captured by the phrase "one man's vulgarity is another's lyric." In recent cases involving violent videos, animal cruelty, campaign finance, and funeral pickets,  the Roberts Court has seemed to make bold statements about the benefits of an unregulated market place of ideas.   But the fuller first amendment picture is much cloudier, especially in settings where we are much less confident that unregulated speech is the greater good.  We will discuss this case law, the underlying premises, and the places in which "things fall apart."  The discussion is relevant to a host of modern problems, from civil discourse to cyberbullying.
 

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 11, 25, April 1, 8, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What is intelligence? What differentiates humans from other animals? This course explores the evolution of cognition in humans and other species, and discusses how science investigates these questions. Why are humans such a unique species on earth--or are we? Why we are so good at solving some problems and yet fail so often at solving others? Research in evolutionary biology has a lot of answers to questions about why animals behave the way they do, and we will examine how this applies to our own lives. We will also touch on the underlying neurobiology, for example, on why is it that insects are so smart (using tools, navigating huge areas, using languages) when their brains are no bigger than a pinhead?

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. October 25, November 1, 8, 15, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The growth and development of many well-known ancient Greek sites can be more fully understood and appreciated in the context of their geological settings and plate-tectonic dynamics (especially earthquakes, faulting, tsunami, and volcanism). Sites such as Delphi, Mycenae, Ithaka (Cephalonia), Akrotiri (Thera), Helike, Thermopolyae, and Ancient Corinth are some of the examples where there is the opportunity to explore the fusion between human history and geological history. In the spirit of University of Arizona’s emphasis on interdisciplinary inquiry, this Humanities Seminar is an uncommon meshing of the humanities and the geosciences.

The general outline of the content of this four-week course follows:

Week 1: Plate-tectonic and human-cultural dynamic shifts over time
Week 2: Site-cultural growth and demise: Minoan, Mycenaean, and Dark Ages
Week 3: Site-cultural growth and demise: Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic
Week 4: Integration of the archaeological-geological record at the Sanctuary of Zeus on Mt. Lykaion: Final Neolithic through Hellenistic Period.

We will be able to visualize plate-tectonic and geological processes by using video clips and animations. Real-time earthquake events that happen to take place in Greece during this course will be exploited as illustrations of natural hazards that have throughout history impacted those living in the Greek world.

The course will be team-taught by two exceptional University of Arizona professors.

Required Reading:

Nur, Amos. Apocalypse: Earthquakes, Archaeology, and the Wrath of God. Princeton University Press, 2008. ISBN: 978-0-691-01602-3.

This text will not be available in the UA bookstore until mid October as the instructors just added it on September 10.

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 30 - December 4, 2015. No class on November 27, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This five-week course examines concepts that have become increasingly relevant to contemporary artists working in a variety of media over the past 50 years. It concentrates on more recent art, understood against the backdrop of modern art movements. In this class we will look at some of the broader theories, practices, and institutions that have emerged in the contemporary art world. Subjects include aura, the digital, photography, monumental and unmonumental sculpture, new image painting, time, science, the environment, personal and cultural identity, religion and spirituality, memorialization, relational aesthetics, the museum, and festivalism. The course will be more thematic than chronological, and will cover art and artists in the emerging and changing global art market of today.

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 26
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course
Register Now

 

Water is the most important resource associated with ecological and human well-being, economic productivity, and security. Stresses are placed on the Earth’s water resources by climate change, population growth, conflicts, and other social changes. Achieving a sustainable use of water may be the most critical issue of natural resource management now facing many societies. This course addresses the science and technology underlying sustainable water use. We will discuss water use within energy generation, domestic supplies, and agriculture while highlighting water use and modification along entire production and supply chains. Water use within agriculture, for example, accounts for more than 70% of the world’s freshwater use. We will also examine multi-disciplinary case studies that highlight specific challenges, successes, and failures in water use and management around the world today. 

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. October 14; December 2, 9, 16, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The year 2013 will commemorate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901), and over four sessions we will survey his vast output of operas. The first lecture will provide an overview of Verdi’s life and career. We will also consider his most important predecessors (Rossini, Bellini, and Donizetti) and the relationship of their music to his as seen in his earliest operas. Subsequent classes will continue the chronological survey, with in-depth examination of selected scenes using video clips and recordings. Finally, we will focus on Verdi’s last operas, Otello and Falstaff, delving deeply into the music as well as the intimate relationship these works have with their Shakespearean sources.
 

Required Reading:

Budden, Julian. Verdi. 3rd ed. Oxford UP, 2008. ISBN: 0195323424.

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 3 - August 24, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Bolshevik Revolution and the Soviet Union played defining roles in the twentieth century, yet are poorly understood. To help us to better grasp their history, this course will integrate the best scholarship and currently available evidence to provide a broad picture of Soviet history that makes the most sense today. We will begin with the context of the Bolshevik seizure of power. Among other topics, the course will cover the relationship of Marxism to Soviet ideology and practice, the rise of Stalin, the Soviet economy, ethnic policy, World War II, the Cold War, Khrushchev’s “thaw,” and Gorbachev and the ultimate fall of the Soviet system. The goal is to give students a new sense of how Soviet history fits into a broader Russian (and human) history.

Required Reading:

Fitzpatrick, Sheila. Everyday Stalinism. Oxford University Press, 2000. ISBN-13: 978-0195050011.

Service, Robert. A History of Modern Russia. Harvard University Press, 2009. ISBN-13: 978-0674034938

 

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. November 8 - December 6, 2018. No class on November 22.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Course Full

Dante’s Purgatorio, as is well known, is not a standalone text; it is simply the second part of The Divine Comedy. In this course we will deal with Dante’s views on redemption and salvation as represented in his Purgatorio. Our focus will be the nature of sin: How it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony). And how human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with divine assistance). We will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, as well as the theology implicit in it. Dante’s Purgatorio changes the tone of the Comedy, illustrating how people can become “pure and ready to rise to the heavens.”

Required Reading:

The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, vol. 2, Purgatorio. Trans. Robert Durling. Oxford Press, 2004. ISBN-13: 978-0195087451.

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The role of tribal governments within the United States is not well understood, largely because most schools do not teach it. This course is designed to fill that gap. Each class will explore a different aspect of how tribal governments fit within the federal system. The first session looks at how historic and modern structures of tribal governments relate to the U.S. government. The next class focuses on issues of cultural property and sacred sites. The third meeting dispels the myth that tribal economic development consists primarily of casinos and examines the research and work of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and the University of Arizona’s Native Nations Institute. The final class pulls together other issues (such as the environment and resource extraction) and examine how tribal governments are approaching them.

Lead instructor Professor Melissa Tatum will be joined by two other instructors, Jide James-Eluyode  and Stephanie Carroll Rainie.

Jide James-Eluyode is a staff attorney in the Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program and postgraduate fellow.  Jide holds his SJD (Doctor of Juridical Science) from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.  His particular academic specialty is the intersection of international trade and indigenous people, particularly in the context of human rights.

Stephanie Carroll Rainie is Manager of the Tribal Health Program and Senior Researcher at the Native Nations Institute (NNI), Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy, The University of Arizona. Stephanie's research program, ongoing for over a decade, explores the links between governance, health care, Indigenous social determinants of health, and community wellness. Her research comes in many forms, from case studies of successful strategies to translation of large datasets into common language. Stephanie is a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona's Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health.

Professor
Tuition:
$150.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2017. No class on March 13.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course explores works from the postwar era by Jewish and German authors--both writings and films--from East and West Germany and Austria. In these works we will see differences among the three successor states to the Nazis, including the ways people dealt with guilt for Nazi crimes, but also with feeling victimized by the bombing of German cities and the division of Germany after the war. The Jewish texts stem mainly from the post-Unification era, when many Jewish writers reflected on how their parents felt shame about deciding to remain in or return to the land that had carried out the mass murders of their families and friends, and thus hesitated to claim German identity. But starting in the 1980s, a new generation of Jewish writers in German have sought to define a new kind of Jewish-German identity. Though the complexities of the German-Jewish relationship have hardly vanished, there is reason for hope, based on writings and films of more recent times, that tensions will diminish.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Using the recent translation by Jean and Robert Hollander, we will deal with Dante’s views on human nature as represented in his Purgatorio.  We shall discuss the nature of sin: how it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony); and how it is that human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with Divine assistance).  We will cover the numerous historical personages and references therein, and the theology implicit to it.
Although Purgatorio is the second portion of Dante’s Comedy, it is not necessary to have studied Inferno to enroll in this course.  Nonetheless, for those people who have studied Inferno, Purgatorio is the next step in the spiritual growth described by Dante.  While Inferno offers a bleak view of human nature, Dante’s Purgatorio illustrates how people can become “pure and ready to rise to the heavens.”

Required Reading:

Alighieri, Dante. Purgatorio. Trans. Jean and Robert Hollander.Anchor, 2004. ISBN-10: 0385497008 (paperback). 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 26, April 9, and April 16, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Is Turkey in Europe or the Middle East? Is this a question of geography, history, politics, or culture? This course explores all those sides of Turkey since the late 19th-century empire, focusing on the republican era after 1923. Turkey is one of the world’s most populous Muslim countries, a parliamentary democracy, a NATO member, and a candidate to join the European Union. The country is also not a postcolony--the Republic of Turkey emerged directly from the ruins of the Ottoman Empire. The seminars will be presented by Dr. Silverstein, as well as other UA experts on Turkey. Each week centers on a theme, including nationalism, modernization, gender, religion and secularism, identity, minorities, the AK Party, political economy, the state, and the politics of history.

Required Reading:

Hanioglu, Sükrü. Atatürk: An Intellectual Biography. Princeton University Press, 2013. ISBN-13: 978-0691157948.

Pamuk, Orhan. Snow. Trans. Maureen Freely. NY: Vintage, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-0375706868.

Zürcher, Erik. Turkey: A Modern History, 3rd ed. London: IB Tauris, 2004. ISBN-13: 978-1860649585.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The percentage of the older population in the United States is increasing, and will continue to grow, due to the aging of the Baby Boomers. These individuals will experience a number of transitions and issues that may be associated with the aging process. Examples of these issues are late onset hearing loss, increased possibility for disabling conditions, decrease in ability to live independently, and decreased likelihood of employment potential due to prejudice toward older adults.

The first of the four class sessions will involve an overview of the population and the kinds of physical changes that may occur during the aging process. This class will also include a description/discussion of an empowerment perspective that can be used throughout the course as a backdrop for discussions. Because hearing loss is experienced by a high percentage of older individuals, the second and third classes will involve an in-depth descriptor of the physical, interpersonal and intrapersonal issues associated with a hearing loss. These two classes will offer practical suggestions for dealing with late onset hearing loss, both for the individual with the loss and for friends and family members. The fourth class will address other transitions that individuals may experience, with a focus on the move from one level of independence to another (moving into an assisted living or nursing home situation). Again, this issue will be discussed through the lens of an empowerment perspective. Practical suggestions will be offered that can be used by individuals who make such moves, as well as to their family members (especially spouse and children) and friends.

The instructor plans on staying for about 30 to 40 minutes after each class to meet people and discuss their individual issues/interests.

Professor
Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Experience the classical world and its enduring legacy on a tour led by archaeologist and art historian Dr. David Soren. Beginning with the amazing structures of ancient Greece and Rome, the course surveys the continuing influence of the classical ideal from antiquity into the Romantic Period and notes the influence of the great discoveries of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The Neo-Classical World of America culminated in the 1893 Chicago Exposition where the acanthus leaves on classical Corinthian columns were replaced by tobacco leaves! The significance of Thomas Jefferson's architecture and designs will also be assessed along with a look at how Fascists and Nazis used classical imagery in their art and commanding architecture.

Professor
Tuition:
$ 195.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. September 30 until December 16, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course will focus on some of the central and most significant texts from the Middle Ages which have withstood the test of time and continue to exert a tremendous fascination on us today. We will explore what some of the fundamental issues in human life have always been and how responses to them in the past prove to be most illuminating for us today. Some of those issues are: meaning of fortune/misfortune, happiness in human life, experience of death, loss of love, love itself, heroism and tragedy, friendship, gift giving, exploration of the unknown, religious conflicts and difference, the quest for God, and the meaning of life as such.
 
As diverse as those issues all seem to be, ultimately they all circle around the one and the same critical point, human life. Medieval literature offers a treasurehouse of most insightful examples of how to approach this huge question from many different perspectives.
 

Required Reading:

Classen, Albrecht, ed. Medieval Answers to Modern Problems. 2nd rev. edition. Cognella, 2013. ISBN: 978-1-62131-979-5.

This book is available for purchase in digital format through the University Readers' student e-commerce store (https://students.universityreaders.com/store/). A few copies will be available at the UA bookstore at the General Books Counter on the main floor.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 26 - December 12, 2016. No class on October 3 and November 21.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

Medieval literature was not simply doom and gloom. It also had a strong sense of hope, happiness, and love, embodied best perhaps in the Holy Grail and courtly love. As in all other literary eras, we can also find many tragic or religious works. But one of the hallmarks of medieval literature, at least in its secular form, is the search for happiness, individual fulfillment, and love, all perhaps best captured by the term “quest.” Think of the quest for the grail, quest for the social ideal of a courtly knight, and quest for love. Happiness is important for us today as well, so in this course we will examine the relevance to us of happiness, love, and hope in the Middle Ages.

Required Reading:

Students enrolling in this class do not need to purchase a textbook. Instead, readings uploaded to a secure site will be made accessible by the end of August.

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed.  Such approaches will bring into focus the education of the main characters through the trials of their experiences. While the novels conform to the comedic mode, in which the principals ultimately realize their destinies as well-married men and women, their education displays the hazards, if not the flaws, of society and humanity. These are some of the ways in which Austen reworks the Bildungsroman formula to create narratives of poise, wit, and artistic seriousness. It is little wonder that Austen has long been regarded as the originator of the “great tradition” of the English novel.

Required Reading:

Austen, Jane. Emma. Dover Thrift Editions, 1998. ISBN: 0486406482.

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. Dover Thrift Editions, 1995. ISBN: 0486284735.

Austen, Jane. Sense and Sensibility. Dover Thrift Editions, 1995. ISBN: 0486290492.

All three texts are paperback editions. 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course surveys the Reformation. Beginning with Europe at the end of the fifteenth century, we discuss why Martin Luther broke with the late-medieval Roman Catholic Church, and explore traditional and novel theologies and ecclesiastical practices. We touch on other actors and movements like the Swiss Reformation (Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin) and the English Anglican/Puritan reforms. In addition, we look at smaller nonconformist ways of thinking like the Anabaptists and their martyrdom at the hands of Protestants and Catholics alike. Finally, we see how Catholicism underwent similar reform in the sixteenth century. Here we examine major Catholic reformers like the Spaniards Ignatius of Loyola and Teresa of Avila, and the Italian Carlo Borromeo, and how the Council of Trent at midcentury set a template for a renewed Catholic Church.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Two years ago the Main Library of the University of Arizona was given a massive donation of original collections from the American Vaudeville Museum by its curators Frank Cullen and Donald McNeilly. This collection is one of the largest in the world. To commemorate this move, Dr. David Soren who coordinated the transfer will offer a course in the history and evolution of American vaudeville from its roots to superstars such as Al Jolson, Sophie Tucker, The Nicholas Brothers, Annette Kellerman, Eddie Cantor and many more.

Dr. Soren was himself a vaudeville performer who is listed among the 1500 most significant vaudevillians in the recent two volume Encyclopedia of Vaudeville. He will discuss the hard life of a vaudevillian, and how the hope of playing the Palace drove performers to endure extraordinary hardships for the chance at success.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
Morning section: TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Afternoon section: TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will explore the creation of the American musical theater and trace the influence of minstrelsy, vaudeville, burlesque, revue, and operetta in the evolution of this unique American form of lyric theater. From Stephen Foster to Stephen Sondheim, the course will chart the development of America's great, original gift to the world: the musical.
 
Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will toast the tunesmiths and poets of Broadway whose collective genius created the golden age of the American musical theater. The course will celebrate the Broadway musical heritage of Cohan, Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Berlin, Rodgers and Hart and Hammerstein, Sondheim, and Webber as we journey from musical comedy to musical theater to pop opera.
 
Musical theater comes alive with rare archival footage of performances that capture the elusive star quality of Mary Martin, Ethel Merman, Alfred Drake, Julie Andrews, John Raitt, Patti Lupone, Bernadette Peters, and many others whose stage magic and artistry made the musical sing. Take a front row seat: It's curtains up! Light the lights! and standing room only for Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance!

Tuition:
$135.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Colorado Plateau is a vibrant tectonic province renowned for its landscapes, geology, and beauty. It is in effect a living, dynamic museum of natural history, with its 3D “displays” covering nearly two billion years of history. Through lectures, photography, and choice rock and fossil specimens we will “see” the sedimentary strata as records of ancient landscapes and seascapes, and “read” earth deformation and volcanism as expressions of plate tectonics in action. Moreover, we will come to know this raw, exposed canyon country as an evolving product of unique regional circumstances of ancient and modern river systems. There is much to explore: the Grand Canyon, Zion Canyon, Bryce Canyon, the Grand Staircase, the Escalante, the Henry Mountains, Arches and Canyonlands, Monument Valley, the Painted Desert, the Petrified Forest, the San Francisco Peaks, and more. Note: This course largely repeats the seminar given in 2014.

Professor
Tuition:
$145
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 20, 27, August 3, 10, 17
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course
Register Now

 

Shakespeare's history plays have never been more relevant. In reading Richard II; Henry IV, Part One; Henry IV, Part Two; and Henry V, this seminar will encounter some of the enduring political questions: the transference of power from one reign—or administration—to the next;  the connection between public and private morality; and the problematics of removing a legitimate but perhaps unfit king—or head of state. But the plays also include great theatre: the tragedy of Richard II, the ruthlessly ambitious but finally remorseful Henry IV, the comedy of the remarkable Falstaff, and the deeply nuanced character of the heroic Henry V. Focusing on the plays' theatricality as well as politics, we shall continuously grapple with a theme of universal importance: the drama of politics and the politics of drama. It is a theme as compelling today as it was in 1600. 

Required Reading:

Any well-edited and annotated edition of the plays will suffice. The instructor will use The Riverside Shakespeare, ed. G.B. Evans (1989). The four plays average approximately 3,200 lines and should require three to five hours of reading per week.

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 3 until December 12, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course analyzes the evolution of Chinese urban space to show how both Chinese people and outsiders viewed the evolving form of the city as the symbol of China’s progress, its position in the world, and its internal social dynamics. From the walls of the Forbidden City to the Western buildings of Shanghai, from the massive squares and the drab structures of communism to the incredible expansion in the last thirty years, we will investigate the shifting meanings of architecture and city life. We will look at how such notions as cosmopolitanism, nationalism, and scientific rationality developed in and around the city. To accomplish this, we will introduce different and less canonical historical sources, including movies, memoirs, photographs, and art objects.
 

Required Reading:

Hung, Wu. Remaking Beijing: Tiananmen Square and the Creation of a Political Space. University of Chicago Press, 2005. ISBN: 0226360792.

Meyer, Michael. The Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed. Walker & Co., 2009. ISBN: 0802717500.

Professor
Tuition:
$85
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

This course continues to survey Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s vast musical output from the unique perspective of specialists in the field, all professors at the University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt leads the first session with an overview of Mozart’s life, focusing particularly on the music for, and inspired by, his association with the Freemasons. In another session Dr. Rosenblatt will continue last year’s discussion of Mozart’s operas. Subsequent sessions will be led by Brian Luce, Professor of Flute, who will consider Mozart’s varied output of chamber music, including the social contexts in which it was first performed, and Ted Buchholz, Assistant Professor of Cello, who will examine Mozart’s works for string quartet.

Required Reading:

Cowdery, William and Neal Zaslaw. The Compleat Mozart: A Guide to the Musical Works of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. W.W. Norton, 1990. ISBN-13: 978-0393028867.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - noon August 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

How did our globalized economy and international culture come to be?

The “Rise of the West” idea has long suggested something innately superior about “Western civilization.” But there are better grounded ways than appeals to cultural or racial superiority to explain the emergence of today’s world, based as it is on European economic power, market logic, science and technology, and to a significant extent, culture. We will learn the central roles of biogeography, epidemiology, patterns of trade, geopolitics, and pure accident in the “Rise of the West.”

We will explore how the various regions of the world eventually became linked up. Then we will focus on the narrower question of how the current global system of capitalism and northern countries’ political and economic domination emerged and thrived. Now that system is globalized, and the era of northern hegemony may be coming to an end. We will see if we can make some sense of all this.

 

Required Reading:
  • Crosby, Alfred.  Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900. Cambridge University Press, 2004. ISBN: 0521546184.
  • Davis, Mike. Late Victorian Holocausts: El Niño Famines and the Making of the Third World. Verso, 2002. ISBN: 1859843824. (excerpts)
  • Marks, Robert B. The Origins of the Modern World: A Global and Ecological Narrative from the Fifteenth to the Twenty-first Century. Rowman and Littlefield, 2006. ISBN: 0742554198.

 

Professor
Tuition:
85.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25 - February 15, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course explores the background and the groundbreaking stylistic features of Stravinsky’s most famous works: Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Les Noces. Considered the epitome of early 20th-century composition, these works defined musical syntax for generations of composers. Les Noces, the least known of these works, is a ballet cantata, calling for four pianos, 11 percussionists, four singing soloists, mixed choir, and corps de ballet. Rarely performed due to its difficulty and complexity, it will not only be a major focus of our course, but the UA School of Dance and Fred Fox School of Music Choral Department will partner for historic performances of it at Stevie Eller Dance Theatre. Class participants, in addition to gaining a thorough understanding of these works and their socioartistic significance, will be treated to behind-the-scenes access during the rehearsal process and given a complimentary ticket to a performance of Les Noces.

Required Reading:

Joseph, Charles M. Stravinsky's Ballets. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2012. ISBN: 978-0300118728.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 30, February 6, 13, 20, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Franz Liszt (1811–1886) is one of the seminal figures of the 19th century. As one of the great piano virtuosos, he toured Europe from one end to the other, coming into contact with virtually all the prominent figures of the period. As a composer, he contributed to all the major genres and pioneered various innovations in form and harmony.
 
A series of four class sessions will consider Liszt, both in terms of biography and music. For the latter, our survey will begin with piano music (the first session), continue with orchestral and choral works (the next two sessions), and conclude with his later and most experimental compositions (the final session).
 
Such a seminar on the music of Liszt seems very appropriate, as this past year we celebrated the 200th anniversary of his birth.

Required Reading:

The Cambridge Companion to Liszt. Ed. Kenneth Hamilton. Cambridge University Press, 2005. ISBN-10: 0-521-64462-3.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Poetry is capable of saving us; it is a perfectly possible
                               means of overcoming chaos.

                                                    --I. A. Richards
                         Words for music perhaps.
                                                             --W. B. Yeats
 
Very likely the earliest form of literary expression, the lyric poem is a relatively short statement in verse, usually in the first person, and deals with emotionally charged subject matter, such as unrequited love, personal loss, celebration, or religious meditation. This seminar will address itself principally to lyric poems in English from the late medieval to the modern period. Authors will include Chaucer, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Dryden, Pope, Coleridge, Blake, Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Browning, Tennyson, Hopkins, Swinburne, Dickinson, Whitman, Yeats, Eliot, Frost, Stevens, Thomas, and Auden.
 
The first meeting will introduce and illustrate some of the distinctive rhetorical devices of verse—meter, rhyme, metaphor, and so on—and some of the main lyric genres—sonnet, epigram, epitaph, elegy. Each of the nine subsequent meetings will center on some half dozen poems spanning the centuries. The procedure will be to read the poems, that is, to listen to their being declaimed and to inquire into their meaning and significance.
 
The approach will require particular attention to the unique principle of order that each poem establishes. The order is linguistic and expresses a semantic meaning. The order is  also rhythmical and phonetic, and ultimately suggests music—a kind of literal music, so to speak. Accordingly, each meeting of the seminar will conclude with a consideration of one or two poems that have been set to music by composers, including Schubert, Brahms, Mahler, Strauss, and Britten.
 
The aim of the seminar is to gain a sense of how lyric poetry means and how it provokes feelings—how in the final analysis it discloses insight that can illuminate, if not counter, the chaos of human experience.     
 

Required Reading:

A required FASTCOPY packet will have to be pre-ordered on the first day of class in the Poetry Center lobby and will be ready for pick-up at the second class meeting.   The cost for the reading packet is $16.50 plus tax.    

Professor
Tuition:
$145
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 13, 20, 27, August 3, 10
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Past Course
Register Now

 

Professor Compitello brings his popular summer 2014 course to Oro Valley!

The detective tale, born of the work of Edgar Alan Poe and altered by Dashiell Hammett, evolved over time in the hands of international masters such as Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Andrea Camilleri, and Donna Leon. Our examination helps identify the qualities that provide this genre with its enduring allure, and explores how modern practitioners play with the form and adapt it to the writer’s needs in ways that continue to fuel reader interest. Through the reading of the required primary text and important recommended secondary texts and through the seminar's "investigation" of the genre we will come to a new appreciation of how the most representative of formulaic fiction broke out of its mold and garnered wide critical appreciation and the loyalty of millions of readers worldwide.

Required Reading:
  • Vazquez Montalban, Manuel. Southern Seas. Trans. Patrick Camiller. Melville International Crime, 2012. ISBN-10: 1612191177.
  • Camilleri, Andrea. The Terra-Cotta Dog. Trans. Stephen Sartarelli. Penguin Books, 2005. ISBN-10: 0142004723. 
  • Leon, Donna. Death at La Fenice. Harper Perennial, 2004. ISBN-10: 006074068X.

Other readings will be posted at Box@UA. Registered students will receive the link to that site to download the readings closer to the beginning of the course.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 30 until April 10, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Forget the rose-in-the-mouth cliché, and discover how tango relates to art, activism, and even therapy. We will analyze films, advertising, theater, poetry, art, documentaries, material culture, digital art forms, and public protests to examine the production, consumption, and diffusion of meaning found in global cultural narratives related to Argentine tango. Students will learn how tango was used to champion women’s rights and modernization in Turkey in the early 20th century, and how Jewish prisoners used it as a symbol of life and endurance during WW II. Participants will explore how tango has merged with Eastern practices and beliefs such as martial arts and Taoism.  One session will focus on the dance itself, including a demonstration and lesson.

 

Required Reading:

Paz, Alberto and Valerie Hart. Gotta Tango. Human Kinetics, 2007. ISBN-10: 0736056300.

Thompson, Robert Farris. Tango: The Art History of Love. Vintage, 2006. ISBN-10: 1400095794.

 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. September 27 - December 13, 2016. No class on October 25 and November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

In this class we will begin to see for ourselves what James contributed to the art to which he devoted his entire life. The course will include lectures on the history and form of the English and American novel, Henry James’s life and times, selected passages from James’s prefaces to the famous New York edition, and an introduction to foundational formal and theoretical concepts we will need for our exploration. James wrote for many kinds of readers: those looking for a good story, his fellow artists, and for his ideal reader—who, not surprisingly, bears an extremely close resemblance to James himself. He provides instructions for each level of reading embedded within each tale and novel, and we will learn to find them.

Required Reading:

James, Henry. The American. Penguin Classics, 1981. ISBN-13: 978-0140390827.

---. The Europeans: A Sketch. Eds. Philip Horne and Andrew Taylor. Penguin Classics, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0141441405.

---. Selected Tales. Penguin Classics, 2001. ISBN-13: 978-0140436945.

---. The Turn of the Screw. 2nd ed. W.W. Norton & Co., 1999. ISBN-13: 978-0393959048.

---. The Portrait of a Lady. 2nd ed. W.W. Norton & Co., 1995. ISBN-13: 978-0393966466.

---. The Wings of the Dove. Penguin Classics, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-0141441283.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$105.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 22 - March 29, 2017 (no class on March 15)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This seminar aims to elicit students’ participation in a free-spirited conversation and regain a sense of wonder and intimacy with architecture.  The discussion topics will be based on five readings, which are accessible, practical, and poetic. They will offer a generous survey of philosophical and architectural thinking from classical to modern, examining the motives and reasons for the making of architecture and the concurrent material consciousness.

The five sessions address Mortimer Adler’s Aristotle for Everybody, which examines man the maker; Paul Valéry’s essay “Eupalinos, or The Architect”; Richard Sennett’s The Craftsman, pointing toward material consciousness; Peter Zumthor’s Thinking Architecture; and Louis I. Kahn’s Light Is the Theme, which focuses on the design and building of the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.

Required Reading:

Kahn, Louis I, and Nell E. Johnson. Light Is the Theme: Louis I. Kahn and the Kimbell Art Museum : Comments on Architecture.  Kimball Art Museum, 2012. ISBN-10: 0300179405.

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

What makes comedy comedy? Does the comedic aesthetic evolve across cultural and temporal barriers? How do interpretation and performance affect our understanding of the works? What does it mean that "comedy is deadly serious"? These are a few of the questions to be raised in the exploration of one major comedy each week, by Aristophanes, Plautus, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Wilde, Shaw, Coward, and Frayn. Historical, social,
political, and psychological contexts will also be addressed. Professional actors will perform key scenes, film clips will be screened, and short essays will supplement the play readings.

Required Reading:

Barnet, Sylvan, Morton Berman, and William Burto, eds. Eight Great Comedies. Penguin Books, 1996. ISBN: 0-452-01170-1.

Plautus. Amphitryon and Two Other Plays. Ed. and trans.Lionel Casson. W. W. Norton & Company, 1971. ISBN :0-393-00601-8.

Coward, Noel. Three Plays: Blithe Spirit, Hay Fever, Private Lives. Vintage International Paperback, 1999. ISBN: 0-679-78179-X.

Frayn, Michael. Noises Off. Anchor Books, 2002. ISBN: 1-4000-3160-5.

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 11 - November 8, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

In the 1920s and 1930s the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. From just after World War I until just after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music, and literature was celebrated in cities such as Harlem, Chicago, Washington, New York, and even as far away as Paris. In this course we will explore the Harlem Renaissance, which is considered the first important movement of black artists and writers in the United States. 

 

Required Reading:

Lewis, David Levering. The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader. New York: The Penguin Group, 1995.  ISBN-10: 0140170367; ISBN-13: 978-0140170368.

Lewis, David Levering. When Harlem was in Vogue. New York: The Penguin Group, 1997. ISBN-10: 0140263349; ISBN-13: 978-0140263343.

             

 

 

 

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course will cover the rich and seminal history and literature of fifth-century Greece; the most creative and productive period in all human history. Our course will particularly focus on Athens, the world's first democracy, from which most of the liberal arts trace their origins.
 
These amazing developments began with the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE, the clash between democratic Athens and the vast invading Persian Empire. From there we will trace how the victorious Athenians built up their power then fought with Sparta in the ruinous Peloponnesian War. We will end with the symbolic fall of the Golden Age of Athenian democracy, best symbolized by the philosopher Socrates’s drinking hemlock in 399 BCE. With those political struggles and warfare as the backdrop, the course will also trace the development and influence of Greece’s wide-ranging culture, which changed forever the way humanity thought about itself.
 
We will look at these events and developments mainly through the eyes of the primary literary sources of the time. Our historical narrative will come from the contemporary historians Herodotus and Thucydides and the later biographer Plutarch. We will also read the three tragic playwrights Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, and the sole extant comic playwright Aristophanes. As we shall see, to the Greeks theater was no mere diversion but was a powerful force for social discussion, political contemplation, public education, and religious expression. Finally, we will read selections from Plato, our principal source for the enigmatic philosopher Socrates.
 
Mike Lippman is a Lecturer in the Classics Department at the University of Arizona. His primary field of research is ancient drama, particularly Greek comedy.  He has been involved in many modern reproductions of ancient plays as translator, actor, co director, and dramaturg. He also is particularly interested in the interplay of ancient political thought and its modern usage. He teaches classes on Sparta and Athens that not only explore antiquity but present the fascinating social experiments these societies represent.

Professor
Tuition:
$195
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 28 - April 7, 2016. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

This course encompasses Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, and King Lear. While addressing ourselves to such matters as language and theatricality, we shall approach plays primarily from the perspectives of plot and characterization. This line of inquiry will enable us to focus on the psychology and morality of the tragic protagonists and at the same time take into account the shape of the plays' action. Thereby we shall be able to move beyond the misguided idea of the “tragic flaw” of characterization to come to terms with the philosophical, if not theological, question that all tragedy ultimately raises: the relationship between moral excellence and man's fate.

Professor
Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. May 9, 16, 23, 30
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Hopi, who have maintained many of their ancient practices while deftly navigating the dramatic changes of the last 500 years, are among the world’s most fascinating and most studied peoples. This seminar will introduce participants to the archaeology, anthropology, and history of the Hopi people, answer questions, and dispel myths. Migration is the central theme of Hopi oral tradition and archaeological evidence lends strong support to the notion that Hopi ancestors migrated through many parts of the US Southwest and were key players in large-scale social transformations. This course will focus on three related topics: the Hopi people as an ethnolinguistic community composed of many different social groups; Hopi claims of affiliation with many different archaeological cultures (e.g., Anasazi, Mogollon, Hohokam); and correlations between archaeological evidence of ancient events in the US Southwest and Hopi oral accounts of their past.

Required Reading:

Lyons, Patrick. Ancestral Hopi Migrations. (Anthropological Papers). University of Arizona Press, 2003.  ISBN-10: 0816522804.

Other readings will be posted at Box@UA. Registered students will receive the link to that site to download the readings closer to the beginning of the course.

Professor
Tuition:
$195.00
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. October 1 until December 10, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Join Professor Lanin Gyurko as he explores the life and films of one of the greatest film directors, Alfred Hitchcock, master of suspense, mystery, and intrigue. Films from the silent and sound eras, in black and white and color, and biopics will be discussed. The course will highlight both the films’ spellbinding content and their use of dazzling cinematic techniques, as well as Hitchcock's adroit utilization of star power--from Joan Fontaine and Laurence Olivier to Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, and Kim Novak. Films that will be studied include The Lodger, Blackmail, Rebecca, Suspicion, Shadow of a Doubt, The Parradine Case, Notorious, Strangers on a Train, Psycho, Rear Window, The Birds, Marnie, and Vertigo, named in 2012 by Sight and Sound as the greatest film of all time. 

Required Reading:

McGilligan, Patrick. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light. It Books, 2004. ISBN: 0060988274.
 

Professor
Tuition:
$120.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m.. to 4:00 p.m. October 26 - November 16, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Past Course

This class deals with the climax of Dante’s Divine Comedy. While Inferno depicts sin and evil, and Purgatorio portrays redemption, Paradiso illustrates the possibility of transcendence. Not only does a blessed soul understand the transcendent universe, but that person also transcends her or his fallen human nature. Using a facing-page translation, in this seminar we will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, and discuss its cosmological and theological basis. Dante’s Paradiso is the culmination of the Comedy, illustrating the perfect nature of the universe, as driven by “the love that moves the sun and other stars.”

Required Reading:

Dante. Paradiso. Trans. Robert and Jean Hollander. Anchor, 2008. ISBN-13: 978-1400031153.

Professor
Tuition:
$85.00
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. Oct. 27, Nov. 3, 10, and 17, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Ludwig van Beethoven was one of the great masters of the Classical and Romantic eras in music, and no genre summarizes his achievement better than the string quartet. This course will examine 16 works spread evenly throughout his early, middle, and late styles. The first six quartets reveal his consolidation of Mozart’s and Haydn’s techniques, the five middle quartets demonstrate his expansion of form and mastery of harmony, and the final five quartets, along with the “Grosse Fuge,” invite us into the experimental realm of the deaf and isolated composer. The first session surveys Beethoven’s life and career; the subsequent three classes are devoted to each of his three style periods, including an in-depth examination of one representative quartet. It is not necessary to read music for this class, and excerpts from Beethoven’s works will be played on recordings and by Dr. Rosenblatt at the piano.

Required Reading:

Winter, Robert, and Robert Martin, eds. The Beethoven Quartet Companion. University of California Press, 1995. ISBN-10: 0520204204.

Professor
Tuition:
$135
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 3 - May 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Bronte family – their extraordinary literary output, as well as their fascinating lives – have become something like a cottage industry, inspiring imitators, adaptations, a tourist attraction, tea towels, dance, music, and even the names of three asteroids. What accounts for this popularity? Is it the novels themselves? Or is it what is sometimes seen as the sensational aspects of their lives? In this course we will look at the novels, reading them as classic works of literature, understanding them as separate artifacts, but also examining their interrelations. At the same time, we will consider our continuing fascination with the Bronte family. We will also read Jean Rhys’s retelling of Jane Eyre’s story through the eyes of the madwoman in the attic. And we will examine the historical conditions of the time and the geographic and sociopolitical differences between Yorkshire, where the sisters mostly lived, and London, seen as the center of literary life.

Required Reading:

Rhys, Jean. Wide Sargasso Sea. W. W. Norton, 2016. ISBN-10: 0393352560. ISBN-13: 978-0393352566.

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre.  Penguin Classics, 2006. ISBN-10: 0141441143. ISBN-13: 978-0141441146.

-------- . Villette. Penguin Classics, 2004. ISBN-10: 0140434798. ISBN-13: 978-0140434798.

Bronte, Emily. Wuthering Heights. Penguin Classics, 2002. ISBN-10: 0141439556.  ISBN-13: 978-0141439556.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS morning section: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. afternoon section: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Gene Kelly once said that “the history of dance on film begins with Astaire.” One might say that the history of dance on film ends with Kelly. Dancin’ Fools will explore the Broadway and Hollywood careers of these two iconic song and dance men who define the Golden Age of movie musicals. Astaire’s elegance and Kelly’s athleticism transformed dance in popular culture and elevated it to the status of art. Astaire in his top hat and tails and Kelly in his white socks and loafers were a counter point to each other, enchanting audiences worldwide in over 60 movie musicals. This seminar will toast the dream machine that produced such film classics as Top Hat, On The Town, Swing Time, An American In Paris, Easter Parade and Singin’ In The Rain.  So “Let’s Face The Music And Dance!"

Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

Since the formation of the current U.S.-Mexico border resulting from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, immigration (both legal and unauthorized) across this border has been a hotly debated political issue. That debate continues today as seen in the rhetoric of last year’s presidential election and the various issues pertaining to the border, including “The Wall,” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and immigration. This seminar will explore various immigration issues across the U.S.-Mexico border through historical, humanistic, and sociological lenses. It focuses on the human drama that has played out, and continues to do so today, as people from Latin America attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, the most frequently crossed in the world. Some of the questions addressed include: What is the border? Who crosses it? Why do they cross? Can the issue of immigration be resolved?

Required Reading:

Rubio-Goldsmith, Raquel; Celestino Fernández, Jessie K. Finch and Araceli Masterson-Algar, Eds.  Migrant Deaths in the Arizona Desert: La Vida No Vale Nada.  Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 2016. ISBN-10: 0816532524; ISBN-13: 978-0816532520.

 

Professor
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, March 1, 8, 22, 29, April 5, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course

The Renaissance begins in Italy and is an invention of the Florentines. This seminar is an examination of the art, architecture, sculpture, literature, and history of the republic of Florence during its period of greatest importance to world history. From the mid-14th to the late 15th century, Florence was the center of a cultural movement that has become the definition of the modern world.
 
We will begin by examining the first glimmerings in the frescoes of Giotto, the literary works of Petrarch and Boccaccio, the sculptural work of Donatello and Ghiberti, and the architecture and engineering of Brunelleschi. We will study the dynamics of the network of thinkers at the court of Lorenzo de’Medici, including Poliziano, Marsilio Ficino, Pico della Mirandola, and Botticelli.
 
As artistic experimentation
with anatomy, musculature, and linear perspective accelerate throughout the 15th century, we will follow the work of the great artists Fra Angelico, Verrochio, Pollaiuolo, and others, and we will study Benozzo Gozzoli’s frescoes in the Medici-Ricardi Palace.
 
We will also follow the fortunes of the republic of Florence in its ups and downs, including the 1478 Pazzi Conspiracy and the career of Savonarola. Through these political upheavals the cultural expressions of Florence still triumph in the High Renaissance masterpieces of Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo. We will read Machiavelli’s Prince, and examine Mannerism in the work of Rosso Fiorentino, Parmigianino, Pontormo, and Bronzino.
 
Reading brief selections from the period, we will have occasion to consider Lorenzo de’ Medici’s songs, the role of St. Francis of Assisi, the sonnets of Michelangelo, Petrarch’s letter to Dionisio da Borgo San Sepolcro, Machiavelli’s letter to Francesco Vettori, and the mathematical and philosophical musings of Leonardo da Vinci. Using all these works, we will try to come to a deeper understanding of the key role played by Florence and its unique culture in initiating a new period of human history, one characterized by observation, rigorous craftsmanship, experimentation, resistance to authority (but respect for the ancients), and an abiding belief that man is the measure of all things.

 

Required Reading:

Boccaccio. The Decameron: A Norton Critical Edition. Trans. Peter Bondanella and Mark Musa. Norton, 1977. ISBN – 0393091325.

Vasari, Giorgio. Lives of the Artists, Trans. J.C. Bondanella, and P. Bondanella. Oxford University Press, USA, 2008. ISBN – 0199537194.

Cellini, Benvenuto. My Life. Trans. P. Bondanella. Oxford University Press, 2009. ISBN – 0199555311.

Machiavelli. The Prince.  Trans. Robert Adams. Norton, 2d edition, 1992. ISBN – 0393962202.

Professor
Tuition:
$ 95.00
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27
Dorothy Rubel Room
Past Course
Register Now

 

In a letter to Thomas Higginson, Emily Dickinson used these words to describe poetry: “If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry.” Marianne Moore described poetry in her poem by the same title as imaginary gardens with real toads in them.  To get a sense of American poetry in our contemporary moment, we will explore four different ways of approaching contemporary poetry.  In each class in this four-week course, we will focus our reading and discussion on poetry that is emblematic of contemporary lyricism; form and playfulness, explorations of language and how language goes about the work of meaning; and the spectrum of the personal and public.  The course will sample a range of contemporary poets and feature a sequence of invitations to respond to course reading in various ways.

Required Reading:

All readings will be uploaded to Box@UA. Registered students will receive the link to that site once the instructor has finalized his readings.