Course Registration

Current Courses

Current Courses

Open Courses

Online

Fall 2022
Thomas Kovach
Tuesdays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Oct 11 to Dec 13
Please Note: The course dates have been adjusted from those listed in our fall brochure in order to avoid Jewish High Holy Days. The course will now begin on October 11 rather than September 27. We hope this makes the course more accessible to everyone wishing to participate. See you in class! This seminar will examine the ways in which Jews, Judaism, and Jewishness have been represented in German works from 1500 to the present. We will view the different ways in which Jews are portrayed, ranging from the imperfectly assimilated community member to the inscrutable alien, from the moral...

Main Campus

Fall 2022
Theodore Buchholz
Mondays
6 PM - 8 PM (AZ Time)
Oct 31 to Nov 21
Attend In Person OR Online This four-week course will explore the cello’s magnum opus, J. S. Bach's Six Suites for Solo Cello. Through these six masterpieces we will discuss Bach’s life in the 1720s, analyze the compositional ingenuity, examine Baroque musical forms, and delve into the fascinating lore that has emerged around the Suites. As we traverse this repertoire, we will also trace the broader trends that have shaped music and culture. These two-hour sessions will feature live performances by Theodore Buchholz and the outstanding cellists from the University of Arizona Cello Studio....
Fall 2022
Christie Kerr
Wednesdays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Nov 2 to Dec 14
Attend In Person OR Online Explore the history and significance of Musical Theatre Dance in the American Musical Theatre genre. Musical Theatre Dance has evolved through the years thanks to many significant choreographers. We will examine the work and style of many of these influential choreographers that have helped shape and mold the American Musical into what it is today. Each week we will discuss different choreographers and their contributions to Musical Theatre. Examples and video footage of choreographers and their dances will be shown and discussed. Additionally, we will focus on what...
Fall 2022
Peter Medine
Wednesdays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Nov 2 to Dec 7
Attend In Person OR Online Madame Bovary and The Portrait of a Lady invite discussion and comparison. Each centers on a remarkable heroine who dares to seek independence even at the risk of violating social norms. The plots conform to the pattern of the standard education novel. But both heroines fall short of the “education” and triumph usually achieved in such novels. Emma Bovary dies at the conclusion. Isabel Archer may end up alive and with her hard-won wisdom and moral sense intact, but she ultimately returns to an impossible marriage which makes for the novel’s famously indeterminate...

Closed Courses

Fall 2022

In Session

Meg Lota Brown
Wednesdays
2 PM - 4 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 21 to Oct 19

Attend In Person OR Online

Many of Shakespeare’s most powerful, intelligent, and subversive characters are female. How were such vividly complex roles constructed in a culture that legally defined women as property, on the grounds of their intellectual and moral inferiority? Given the early modern imperatives of feminine silence, chastity, and obedience, how is it that women impel Shakespeare’s plots, orchestrate conflicts, and—in many instances—impose “resolutions”? This five-week course considers representations of women in three of Shakespeare...

Fall 2022

In Session

Bella Vivante
Fridays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 23 to Dec 9

Attend In Person OR Online

About 2600 years ago, an "Intellectual Revolution" shifted Greek thinking from mythic world descriptions to observational ones. The first group of thinkers in this new era lived in eastern Greece and started new directions in math and sciences. The next group, notably including Pythagoras, moved from eastern to western Greece and into theological inquiries. Pythagoras's philosophy meshed mathematical, moral, and theological ideas and influenced Plato and the development of Western philosophy for 1000 years. Here, we...

Fall 2022

In Session

Dian Li
Mondays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 26 to Oct 24

Attend In Person OR Online

It is for good reason that China is often called a land of poetry.  As the longest continuous form of creative writing in the country, poetry has been a defining feature in the life of China’s elite, from their participation in the civil service exams to their performance of rituals on official and leisure occasions. The ideas for poetry and its genre formation, however, have been a subject of constant debate throughout history, the most radical of which took place at the turn of the nineteenth century, when Chinese men...

Fall 2022

In Session

Philip Waddell
Tuesdays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 27 to Dec 6

In this course, the class will examine how the image of the Roman emperor was and is constructed. We will be investigating questions of source material reliability, genre, and the use and power of rhetoric in history. Through an examination of Rome’s rulers, from Julius Caesar to Emperor Domitian, using the ancient written source material (in translation), we will discover the ways in which we, no less than the ancients, forged images of the emperors.

Hybrid Course Format

  • All classes will be delivered in-person and online via live video...
Fall 2022

In Session

Laura Hollengreen
Wednesdays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 28 to Oct 26

Attend In Person OR Online

The course investigates the ecology of war in the later nineteenth and early twentieth century to determine its impact on post-war perception, avant-garde art and architecture, and conceptions of place and memory. The primary focus will be on World War I, with secondary coverage of the U.S. Civil War. Readings and class meetings will deal with a range of topics, including the philosophy and culture of war, landscape modification, technologies of war, combat experience, the psychological costs of war, war and...

Fall 2022

In Session

Marie-Pierre Le Hir
Thursdays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 29 to Dec 8

Attend In Person OR Online

Why is French the most-commonly taught language in the United States after Spanish? Why are Americans so interested in things French? This course suggests that answers may be found in the long and fascinating saga of the French in North America, the topic of this seminar. The names of rivers (Poudre, Platte), cities (Saint-Louis, Baton Rouge, Louisville, Lafayette), and people (Bonneville, Crapo, Ducey, Duval, Québedeaux), several thousands of them, all evoke the French heritage of the United States. Most of the stories...

Fall 2022

In Session

Grace Fielder
Thursdays
1 PM - 4 PM (AZ Time)
Sep 29 to Oct 27

NEW! HSP Deep Dive Seminar

Humans use language not just to communicate information but also to indicate identity, that is, the “self versus other” or “us versus them” distinction. Judges 12:6 describes how the pronunciation of the Hebrew word shibboleth was used by the Gileadites to identify their enemy, the Ephraimites, at the river Jordan. Putin claims that Ukrainian is not a separate language; therefore, Ukraine is Russian territory. In the 19th century, language was part of the nation-building process whereby a ‘people’ or ‘...

Fall 2022

In Session

Thomas P. Miller
Mondays
9:30 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Oct 3 to Nov 21

Attend In Person OR Online

Moderate Democrats blame progressives for their divisions, and Republicans use them to depict Democrats as socialists. We will look beyond these partisan divisions to consider how our times parallel those of the Progressive Era. One has to go back a century to find the same levels of economic inequality and mass immigration. The historical precedent for our global pandemic is the Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918, which killed an estimated fifty million people worldwide—twice the number of Covid victims and a far higher...