Current Courses

To see all courses currently available scroll to the bottom of this page.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Explore ancient Greek plays as dynamic examples of live theater and discover the often-spectacular performance aspects that rival opera, Busby Berkeley musicals or Cirque de Soleil. In this course, we will examine the role of the chorus and the choral odes, which form the musical framework for the plays and whose musical stylings are incredibly diverse and creative. We will encounter memorable characters presented in highly dramatic scenes that are performed to the audience’s delight, horror, and edification. Addressing significant issues of the day, ancient Greek drama continues to resonate today, proving their perpetual timeliness and emerging as dynamic, living entities with much to offer a contemporary audience. Basing the thematic interpretation on the performance aspects results in a rich, multi-textured appreciation of the plays. 

Required Reading:

Please note: You may use any translation of the assigned plays that you have or find ready access to in hard copy or online.

  1. Aeschylus. Oresteia. Translated by Peter Meineck. Hackett Publishing, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0872203907.
  2. ---. The Complete Aeschylus, vol. II: Persians and Other Plays. Translated by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2009.  ISBN-13: 978-0195373288.
  3. Sophocles. The Complete Sophocles, vol. I: The Theban Plays. Translated by Peter Burian and Alan Shapiro. Oxford University Press, 2010. ISBN-13: 978-0195388800.
  4. Euripides. Women on the Edge: Four Plays by Euripides. Eds. Ruby Blondell et al. Routledge, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0415907743.
  5. Euripides. Bacchae. Translated by Paul Woodruff. Hackett Publishing, 1998. ISBN-13: 978-0872203921.
  6. Aristophanes: The Complete Plays. Translated by Paul Roche. Penguin, 2005. ISBN-13: 978-045121409.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 24 - December 10, 2018. No class on November 12 and November 19.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

2018 marks the centennial of the Great War, as World War I was originally known. The War ended the Concert of Europe, reworked global geography and transformed the domestic structures of the combatants. This course will examine the War’s origins, explore how it ended the major world empires, and trace the ways it still casts its shadow across the international community today. We will also consider the factors that motivated individuals to continue fighting even as the casualty lists reached catastrophic levels and few families avoided the loss of loved ones from battle, disease, or persecution. Finally, we will examine how World War I increased the United States’ participation in world affairs and set it on its path to global hegemony.

Required Reading:

Remarque, Erich Maria. All Quiet on the Western Front. Ballatine Books, 1987. ISBN-10: 0449213943.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

China’s rise may be the single most transformative event of the contemporary world. Many have called attention to the economic and political impact of China’s rise, but what of China’s cultural renaissance? What does it bode for the future? The reinvention of China’s cultural identity is being shaped in terms of its past, but which past is being held up as the model —Communism, Confucianism, Legalism? This course looks at current engagements with China’s past with an eye toward exploring the factors shaping China’s future. It introduces the traditional lenses of Chinese thought —Confucianism, Legalism, Daoism, and Buddhism— and reflects on their potential relevance for contemporary China. In short, the course has two aims: to introduce key aspects of China’s traditional cultures and to look at ways in which these key aspects are contributing to contemporary debates in China over its future direction.

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2018. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

This course will explore how the political developments at the turn of the twentieth century shaped the culture of Vienna. The failure of liberalism after its brief period in power due to the economic crisis of the 1870s, the rise of anti-Semitic parties, and World War I caused vast cultural upheaval that may be seen in the period’s works of literature, music, art, architecture, philosophy of science, Zionism, and psychoanalysis. We will examine how writers, artists, and other cultural figures dealt with the devastation of World War I and the fall of the Habsburg Empire after centuries of rule. Finally, this course will trace how all of these aspects were prophetic of the worst catastrophes that the twentieth century would bring.

Required Reading:

1. Schorske, Carl. Fin-de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture. Vintage, 1980.  ISBN-10: 0394744780. ISBN-13: 978-0394744780.

2. Schnitzler, Arthur. Four Major Plays. Smith and Kraus Pub, 1999. ISBN-10: 1575251809. ISBN-13: 978-1575251806.

3. The Whole Difference: Selected Writings of Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Ed. J.D. McClatchy. Princeton University Press, 2008.  ISBN-10: 0691129096. ISBN-13: 978-0691129099.

4. Freud, Sigmund. The Interpretation of Dreams. Basic Books, 2010. ISBN-10: 0465019773. ISBN-13: 978-0465019779.

 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
Session 2 will be held in the afternoon from 2 - 4 PM.
Both sessions will contain the same class content and will be held on the same dates this Fall.

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is mounting that intellectual challenge, social engagement, and regular physical activity can have a profound positive impact on our lives as we age. Why? Because they influence the ongoing alterations, or “plasticity,” in our ever-changing brains. This course examines the recent revolution in our views of brain function that gives us a new way to grasp how our brains work.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Nov. 7, 14, 28, Dec. 5, and 12, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

This course explores the United States Supreme Court and its role in deciding fundamental social questions. After an introductory class on the Court itself, we will focus on landmark cases involving race in education, abortion, religious freedom, and wartime detention. Readings will include edited versions of the Court’s opinions. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the Court’s power, function, and role as part of the larger government, and appreciate whether and when we should accede to the Court’s interpretation of the Constitution.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
Session 2 will be held in the afternoon from 2 - 4 PM.
Both sessions will contain the same class content and will be held on the same dates this Fall.

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is mounting that intellectual challenge, social engagement, and regular physical activity can have a profound positive impact on our lives as we age. Why? Because they influence the ongoing alterations, or “plasticity,” in our ever-changing brains. This course examines the recent revolution in our views of brain function that gives us a new way to grasp how our brains work.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. November 8 - December 6, 2018. No class on November 22.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Course Full

Dante’s Purgatorio, as is well known, is not a standalone text; it is simply the second part of The Divine Comedy. In this course we will deal with Dante’s views on redemption and salvation as represented in his Purgatorio. Our focus will be the nature of sin: How it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony). And how human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with divine assistance). We will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, as well as the theology implicit in it. Dante’s Purgatorio changes the tone of the Comedy, illustrating how people can become “pure and ready to rise to the heavens.”

Required Reading:

The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri, vol. 2, Purgatorio. Trans. Robert Durling. Oxford Press, 2004. ISBN-13: 978-0195087451.

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 15 - November 5, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

The cello is an incredibly expressive and versatile instrument, reflecting the scope and trends of western music history. In this course, we will explore the origins of the cello, compare the unique artistries of historic cellists, enjoy movements from the monumental Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by Bach, look through the intimate lens of sonatas and chamber music, and indulge in the expressive and virtuosic brushstrokes of the concerto repertoire. Live performances by outstanding cellists from the University of Arizona Cello Studio will be featured in class. Finally, this incredibly rich and revealing repertoire will be framed within the larger context of the constantly changing trends that shape music history and culture.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$165
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 17 - November 14, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

Science and technology enhance our understanding of cultural history by uniting scholars across disciplines in order to expand art historical perspectives and preserve cultural masterpieces. This course begins with an overview of the campus collections and the basic tenets of museum collections care. Guest presentations by scholars from across the University of Arizona will examine the studies of art production, materials science, and cutting-edge dating and imaging methods. In conclusion, we will review the latest in conservation technology and the issues surrounding the collecting and preservation of contemporary art today.

Required Reading:

Due to the diversity in subject matter, there are no single textbooks required for this course. Readings will uploaded to Box@UA and the link for this site will be shared with registered students in early September.

Professor
Tuition:
$165
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 27 - October 25, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Course Full

For over two millennia, Rome has been central in the West’s symbolic landscape and the city is still filled with the glorious hidden treasures of centuries. The humanist epigram Quanta Roma fuit ruina docet—‘Her ruins teach us how great Rome was,’ invites a study of this hidden city through different thematic lenses. We will explore the monuments but also urban design, architecture, sculpture, town planning, religion, politics, street life, and texts. We will embark upon our own Grand Tour through five itineraries, as we discover and discuss individual artists and their works, such as Bernini’s fountains and Borromini’s whirling spaces; intimate chapels and grand frescoes, like those in Santa Prassede or in the Sistine Chapel; quiet piazzas and talking statues; papal anecdotes and neighborhood festivals; and the films and literature that inspire us to experience Rome both as a material place and as an idea.

Required Reading:

1. James, Henry. Daisy Miller: Any text (on-line or hard copy) is fine.

2. Wharton, Edith. Roman Fever: Any text (on-line or hard copy) is fine.