Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Bella Vivante

Explore ancient Greek plays as dynamic examples of live theater and discover the often-spectacular performance aspects that rival opera, Busby Berkeley musicals or Cirque de Soleil. In this course, we will examine the role of the chorus and the choral odes, which form the musical framework for the plays and whose musical stylings are incredibly diverse and creative. We will encounter memorable characters presented in highly dramatic...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Greg Sakall

This course explores the United States Supreme Court and its role in deciding fundamental social questions. After an introductory class on the Court itself, we will focus on landmark cases involving race in education, abortion, religious freedom, and wartime detention. Readings will include edited versions of the Court’s opinions. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the Court’s power, function, and role as part of the...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Nov. 7, 14, 28, Dec. 5, and 12, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Leslie P. Tolbert

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Dante’s Purgatorio, as is well known, is not a standalone text; it is simply the second part of The Divine Comedy. In this course we will deal with Dante’s views on redemption and salvation as represented in his Purgatorio. Our focus will be the nature of sin: How it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony). And how human beings can transcend their fallen...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. November 8 - December 6, 2018. No class on November 22.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Leslie P. Tolbert

Professor Tolbert brings back her popular spring 2016 course with some exciting updates!

Please Note: We will be offering two sessions of this course in the coming semester.
Session 1 will be held in the morning from 9 - 11 AM.
...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. November 8 - December 13, 2018. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Olivia Miller

Science and technology enhance our understanding of cultural history by uniting scholars across disciplines in order to expand art historical perspectives and preserve cultural masterpieces. This course begins with an overview of the campus collections and the basic tenets of museum collections care. Guest presentations by scholars from across the University of Arizona will examine the studies of art production, materials science,...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 17 - November 14, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Theodore Buchholz

The cello is an incredibly expressive and versatile instrument, reflecting the scope and trends of western music history. In this course, we will explore the origins of the cello, compare the unique artistries of historic cellists, enjoy movements from the monumental Suites for Unaccompanied Cello by Bach, look through the intimate lens of sonatas and chamber music, and indulge in the expressive and virtuosic brushstrokes of the...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 15 - November 5, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Thomas Kovach

This course will explore how the political developments at the turn of the twentieth century shaped the culture of Vienna. The failure of liberalism after its brief period in power due to the economic crisis of the 1870s, the rise of anti-Semitic parties, and World War I caused vast cultural upheaval that may be seen in the period’s works of literature, music, art, architecture, philosophy of science, Zionism, and psychoanalysis. We...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2018. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Albert Welter

China’s rise may be the single most transformative event of the contemporary world. Many have called attention to the economic and political impact of China’s rise, but what of China’s cultural renaissance? What does it bode for the future? The reinvention of China’s cultural identity is being shaped in terms of its past, but which past is being held up as the model —Communism, Confucianism, Legalism? This course looks at current...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 2 - December 11, 2018. No class on November 20.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Cynthia White

For over two millennia, Rome has been central in the West’s symbolic landscape and the city is still filled with the glorious hidden treasures of centuries. The humanist epigram Quanta Roma fuit ruina docet—‘Her ruins teach us how great Rome was,’ invites a study of this hidden city through different thematic lenses. We will explore the monuments but also urban design, architecture, sculpture, town planning, religion, politics, street life, and texts....

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 27 - October 25, 2018
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Richard Cosgrove

2018 marks the centennial of the Great War, as World War I was originally known. The War ended the Concert of Europe, reworked global geography and transformed the domestic structures of the combatants. This course will examine the War’s origins, explore how it ended the major world empires, and trace the ways it still casts its shadow across the international community today. We will also consider the factors that motivated individuals to continue fighting...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 24 - December 10, 2018. No class on November 12 and November 19.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Peter Medine
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Shakespeare's history plays have never been more relevant. In reading Richard II; Henry IV, Part One; Henry IV, Part Two; and Henry V, this seminar will...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 20, 27, August 3, 10, 17
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello
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Professor Compitello brings his popular summer 2014 course to Oro Valley!

The detective tale, born of the work of Edgar Alan Poe and altered by Dashiell...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 13, 20, 27, August 3, 10
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: David Soren

Experience the classical world and its enduring legacy on a tour led by archaeologist and art historian Dr. David Soren. Beginning with the amazing structures of ancient Greece and Rome, the course surveys the continuing influence of the classical ideal from antiquity into the Romantic Period and notes the influence of the great discoveries of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The Neo-Classical World of America culminated in the 1893 Chicago Exposition where the acanthus leaves on classical Corinthian columns were replaced by tobacco leaves! The...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Tyler Meier
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In a letter to Thomas Higginson, Emily Dickinson used these words to describe poetry: “If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steve Smith
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Water is the most important resource associated with ecological and human well-being, economic productivity, and security. Stresses are placed on the Earth’s water resources by climate change...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 29, June 5, 12, 19, 26
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Monica Casper, Stephanie Troutman

This course explores the work of speculative fiction writer Octavia Butler, recipient of the Hugo and Nebula awards and a MacArthur “genius.” Credited with influencing the field of Afrofuturist studies, Butler rendered a dystopian vision of the world, one rooted in her own experiences as a Black woman in twentieth-century America. Like all good literature, her work says something important about the period in which she wrote. It was also eerily prescient and can serve as a lens turned on our current moment of political instability, climate...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 10, 17, 24, 31, June 7
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Patrick Lyons

The Hopi, who have maintained many of their ancient practices while deftly navigating the dramatic changes of the last 500 years, are among the world’s most fascinating and most studied peoples. This seminar will introduce participants to the archaeology, anthropology, and history of the Hopi people, answer questions, and dispel myths. Migration is the central theme of Hopi oral tradition and archaeological evidence lends strong support to the notion that Hopi ancestors migrated through many parts of the US Southwest and were key players in...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. May 9, 16, 23, 30
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

This seminar will examine the social movements that came to the fore in the year that began with the Tet Offensive and ended with the launch around the moon. The first three classes will examine the antiwar, civil rights, and women’s movements using images and texts to consider what the ‘60s came to represent. In our last class we will consider how the divisions between the counterculture and “moral majority” led to the election of Richard Nixon—and to the antigovernment sentiments that have spread from left to right in recent decades. In...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 2, 9, 16, 23
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steve Smith

Professor Smith brings his popular June 2017 course to Oro Valley!

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 2, 9, 16, 23, 2018
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

This seminar will examine the social movements that came to the fore in the year that began with the Tet Offensive and ended with the launch around the moon. The first three classes will examine the antiwar, civil rights, and women’s movements using images and texts to consider what the ‘60s came to represent. In our last class we will consider how the divisions between the counterculture and “moral majority” led to the election of Richard Nixon—and to the antigovernment sentiments that have spread from left to right in recent decades. In...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 1, 8, 15, 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Eleni Hasaki

This class continues the discussion of Technological Wonders of Classical Antiquity from 2016. While the 2016 course focused on pyrotechnology (pottery and bronze-casting), this course will emphasize stone working (sculpture and temple architecture). The 2016 course is NOT a prerequisite to this class:

What were the key technologies and major technical advancements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines the interrelated achievements of ancient sculpture making and temple construction. From the colossal nude males of the...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 1, 8, 15, 22, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Dian Li

In order to understand modern China, we must understand the changes that have shaken its cultural foundations and profoundly transformed the country with a speed unrivaled in recent world history. The term “modern” in this sense is more than a chronological marker but a new conceptualization of the self and the world. This seminar will explore the rationalization and execution of these changes and resistance to them in modern China. The course will focus on significant moments of rupture in 20th-century history and explore their political...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Barbara Kosta

Professor Kosta repeats her popular course from 2015 with a few variations:

Germany’s Weimar Republic (1919-1933) rose out of the ashes of World War I to become both an immensely creative and fraught period of the twentieth century. The exciting capital Berlin, a laboratory of modernity, was the center of radical experimentation in the visual and performing arts, in mass entertainment and theater, and in literature and architecture. While the cultural stage was vibrant and intoxicating, the shell shock of World War I, the demands of...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Phyllis Taoua

This course explores the emergence of freedom as an ideal in Africa during and after the movements for national liberation. We will examine the people’s ongoing struggle to achieve social justice after colonial independence as a quest for meaningful freedom. To understand the emergence of this ideal and the nature of the people’s struggle, we will consider complex narratives (film, fiction) of major importance and read social theory (history, economics, sociology). The seminar’s scope is pan-African and covers the historical period of the...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 24 through April 4, 2018 (no class March 7)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

This course brings together six distinguished scholars from the College of Humanities to explore movements of social resistance and revolution. Malcolm Alan Compitello, Professor and Head of Spanish and Portuguese, examines the Spanish Civil War as a crucial moment whose social and cultural impact is still felt today. Alain-Philippe Durand, Dean of the College, explores how wars and revolutions shape Jean Renoir’s 1930s films. Albert Welter, Professor and Head of East Asian Studies, focuses on the role that revolution has played in China’s...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, 2018
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron (ca. 1348-1351) is a masterpiece of world literature. Boccaccio is one of the Three Crowns, the three founding authors of Italian literature (along with Dante and Petrarch). Yet his Decameron is a conundrum. Composed in the wake of the Black Plague of 1348, the Decameron presents a world populated with flesh-and-blood individuals motivated by personal desires. Often its characters are women, and their desires are sexual; Boccaccio’s female characters use their intellect to achieve...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 23 through April 3, 2018 ( no class on March 6)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Poss

Science fiction is a modern art form closely tied to advances in science and technology. It generates an imaginary space where a new development in science can be imaginatively tested for its possible effects on humanity. Some scenarios are cautionary, while others are hopeful and exhilarating. When combined with the fantasy genre, these stories set the imagination free to soar. This seminar will examine a series of great science fiction and fantasy narratives, including novels, short stories,...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 19 through April 6, 2018 (no classes on March 2 & 9). Please note that the start date had to be moved up by one week.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Celestino Fernandez

Since the formation of the current U.S.-Mexico border resulting from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, immigration (both legal and unauthorized) across this border has been a hotly debated political issue. That debate continues today as seen in the rhetoric of last year’s presidential election and the various issues pertaining to the border, including “The Wall,” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and immigration. This seminar will explore various immigration issues across the U.S.-Mexico border through...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

This course surveys the music of Ludwig van Beethoven from the perspectives of different professors at the Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt begins with an overview of Beethoven’s life: his youth in Bonn, the reasons for his move to Vienna, and the outline of his early, middle, and late style periods. He will also introduce the stylistic characteristics of Beethoven’s music. Subsequent sessions will be led by Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, who will consider Beethoven’s sacred music, particularly the Missa Solemnis...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 16 - November 13, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

ATTEND THIS COURSE IN OUR NEW ORO VALLEY LOCATION

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine ComedyInferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. October 12 - November 2, 2017.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Bryan Carter

In the 1920s and 1930s the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. From just after World War I until just after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music, and literature was celebrated in cities such as Harlem, Chicago, Washington, New...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 11 - November 8, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Anna Dornhaus

Biology has well-supported insights into how animals make decisions and why they behave the way they do, in contexts from foraging to cooperation. This knowledge is grounded in theory as well as empirical evidence. Generally these insights also apply to humans: humans evolved, and thus their brain as well as their preferences, capabilities, and learning abilities are all the result of natural selection, as they are for any other animal. What consequences does this have for our understanding of how people behave when shopping, budgeting time...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2017. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jerry Hogle

This seminar focuses on the six poets (one recently rediscovered) who most defined  English Romanticism in poetry and verse drama between 1798 and 1824. It emphasizes their philosophical, emotional, and stylistic tugs-of-war, despite their quite different politics: first, between proposals for revolutions in social organization and how individuals relate to the wider world (they all knew the American and French revolutions of the 1770s-90s), and second, retrogressive longings for earlier orders of being and poetic styles whose revivals...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 4 - December 13, 2017. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Marie-Pierre Le Hir

This seminar examines the relations between culture and power in nineteenth-century France through the study of masterpieces of realist fiction. The realist novel is a cultural artefact specific to the nineteenth century, a genre born with the modern democratic nation-state at a time when (relative) freedom of expression allowed for the emergence of a public sphere. The four novels studied in this course also have in common that they are romans d’éducation (or Bildungsroman) thematically focused on young men’s struggles to...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 3 - December 15, 2017. No class on November 21.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Scott Lucas

This course explores Islam and Muslim societies in the contemporary period. It begins by focusing on the fundamentals of Islam, such as the life of Muhammad, the Qur’an, law, and theology. The topics we will discuss include opportunities for Muslims in the United States, Islamic spirituality (including Sufism), and successful Muslim-majority countries, such as Indonesia. The primary challenges we will address include political authoritarianism, sectarianism, and religious extremism. The objective of this seminar is to provide accurate...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m September 28 - December 7, 2017. PLEASE NOTE THAT CLASS STARTS ONE WEEK EARLIER THAN DESCRIBED IN THE BROCHURE! No class on November 23.
McClelland Hall, room # 123, 1130 East Helen Street
Professor: David Gibbs

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. September 15 - December 15, 2017. No classes on October 6, October 20, November 10, and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

ATTEND THE INAUGURAL COURSE IN ORO VALLEY

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 pm August 4 - September 1, 2017
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Susan A. Crane

This course examines modern histories of collective memories through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography, and visual culture. We will consider moments of tension when history and memory appear to be at odds, when competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict, or when silences about the past are broken. Case studies may include: the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian in 1995; appeals for apologies for past atrocities, such as slavery, human trafficking, or...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm August 1 - August 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

The University of Arizona has one of America's greatest holdings in the field of vaudeville. Special Collections Guest Curator David Soren presents some of the best stars and specialty acts you've never heard of along with fascinating and little-known information about some of the biggest stars. Featured are vaudeville's most versatile performer Joe Cook, whose sidekick, pantomime comic Dave Chasen, founded Chasen's Restaurant (open 1936-1995) in West Hollywood. Learn about the dark side of Al Jolson, and witness one of his performances...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 11:00 am July 6 - July 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

Virgil, the greatest Roman poet, did more to establish the idea of Rome (and hence of the Roman Empire) than any other ancient poet. As a young man he began his poetic career writing pastoral poems, which are called Eclogues. This seminar will study the political pressures in the final days of the Roman Republic that led Virgil to invent a new genre of poetry. He borrowed the idea of the pastoral from the Hellenistic Greek poets, but made a new genre of poetry uniquely his own. Concentrating on a selection from Virgil’s ...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 30 - July 28, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steve Smith

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants from different deserts. Here the key questions will be: How do these plants grow and...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 am - 12:00 pm June 6 - June 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Tannis Gibson

What inspired Romantic composers of the 19th century to create the significant piano works that continue to speak profoundly to today’s audiences? Throughout the Romantic era the piano and the pianist-composers who wrote for it assumed an increasingly important role in European society. These pianist-composers and virtuosi fully explored the inner depths of their imaginations, and it is perhaps in the solo piano repertoire most of all that we as listeners become privy to their most passionate and idiosyncratic work. In this...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 1 - June 29, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Tatum

The United States was founded on broad principles of individual freedom – declarations of the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” were central to the American Revolution and the subsequent foundations of the new country. Looking back, we know that those rights were meant at the time for white land-owning men, and it was only after two centuries of discrimination that formal actions were taken to eliminate institutional racism and gender discrimination from U.S. law.

This dismantling of institutional racism did not...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 4 - May 25, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

The Bronte family – their extraordinary literary output, as well as their fascinating lives – have become something like a cottage industry, inspiring imitators, adaptations, a tourist attraction, tea towels, dance, music, and even the names of three asteroids. What accounts for this popularity? Is it the novels themselves? Or is it what is sometimes seen as the sensational aspects of their lives? In this course we will look at the novels, reading them as classic works of literature, understanding them as separate artifacts, but also...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 3 - May 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Alvaro Malo

This seminar aims to elicit students’ participation in a free-spirited conversation and regain a sense of wonder and intimacy with architecture.  The discussion topics will be based on five readings, which are accessible, practical, and poetic. They will offer a generous survey of philosophical and architectural thinking from classical to modern, examining the motives and reasons for the making of architecture and the concurrent material consciousness.

The five sessions address Mortimer Adler’s Aristotle for Everybody, which...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 22 - March 29, 2017 (no class on March 15)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Brian Silverstein

Turkey, one of the world’s most populous Muslim-majority countries, is a member of NATO and has tried to enter the European Union for over ten years. Since 2002 the country has undergone rapid and profound changes under the rule of the Justice and Development Party and its leader Tayyip Erdogan. These changes include a growth-oriented economy, massive infrastructural investment, softening of the country’s secularist ideology, a transformed foreign policy oriented toward economic and political engagement, and in recent years controversial...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 27 to April 7, 2017. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

This seminar will concentrate on eight of Shakespeare's comedies, among them Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. The approach will assume that comedy is a genre distinguished not by light-hearted humor or triviality but by structure of plot. The action moves from conflict and separation to resolution and union, and the plays typically end in betrothal or marriage. But whatever its romance, Shakespeare's comedy is serious and psychologically realistic. The plays explore the hazards of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Susan Karant-Nunn

This course surveys the Reformation. Beginning with Europe at the end of the fifteenth century, we discuss why Martin Luther broke with the late-medieval Roman Catholic Church, and explore traditional and novel theologies and ecclesiastical practices. We touch on other actors and movements like the Swiss Reformation (Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin) and the English Anglican/Puritan reforms. In addition, we look at smaller nonconformist ways of thinking like the Anabaptists and their martyrdom at the hands of Protestants and Catholics alike....

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mary Beth Haralovich

Set decorators call it the art of silent storytelling--how art direction and production design (everything on screen) establish and convey character and story. We examine this “narrative space” through three topics. “Life Stories” that range from personal to epic: class relations in WWI prisoner of war camps (Jean Renoir, La Grande Illusion); a father-daughter relationship in 1960s Japan (Yasuhiro Ozu, An Autumn Afternoon); and ethnicity in Paris suburbs (Mathieu Kassovitz, La Haine). “Meditations on Landscape”...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 25 - April 5, 2017. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bruce Chamberlain

This course explores the background and the groundbreaking stylistic features of Stravinsky’s most famous works: Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Les Noces. Considered the epitome of early 20th-century composition, these works defined musical syntax for generations of composers. Les Noces, the least known of these works, is a ballet cantata, calling for four pianos, 11 percussionists, four singing soloists, mixed choir, and corps de ballet. Rarely performed due to its...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25 - February 15, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

In this course we’ll explore Homer’s brilliant storytelling in The Odyssey: his tales of Odysseus’s struggles to return home after the Trojan War. While the poem highlights the hero’s fantastic adventures, the underlying meanings reflect profound social concerns: female and male identities, and their respective realms and relationships; revisiting The Iliad’s military-centered notions of heroism from social-oriented perspectives; the roles of gods; storytelling traditions, and more. The class looks at how these diverse...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24 - April 4, 2017. No class on March 14.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas Kovach

This course explores works from the postwar era by Jewish and German authors--both writings and films--from East and West Germany and Austria. In these works we will see differences among the three successor states to the Nazis, including the ways people dealt with guilt for Nazi crimes, but also with feeling victimized by the bombing of German cities and the division of Germany after the war. The Jewish texts stem mainly from the post-Unification era, when many Jewish writers reflected on how their parents felt shame about deciding to...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2017. No class on March 13.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Noam Chomsky, Marvin Waterstone

This spring students of all ages will have the exciting opportunity to learn about and discuss politics with one of the greatest public intellectuals of our time, Noam Chomsky. Chomsky and UA emeritus professor Marv Waterstone will coteach a seven-week class titled “What Is Politics?” that is both a general education course for UA undergraduates and a Humanities Seminar class for community members. Connecting students from multiple generations and political outlooks, this course is sure to stimulate ideas, debate, and dialogue.

The...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. AND THURSDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. January 12 - March 2, 2017.
Environmental and Natural Resources Building 2 (ENR2), Room N120
Professor: Fabian Alfie

This class deals with the climax of Dante’s Divine Comedy. While Inferno depicts sin and evil, and Purgatorio portrays redemption, Paradiso illustrates the possibility of transcendence. Not only does a blessed soul understand the transcendent universe, but that person also transcends her or his fallen human nature. Using a facing-page translation, in this seminar we will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, and discuss its cosmological and theological basis. Dante’s ...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m.. to 4:00 p.m. October 26 - November 16, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

This course continues to survey Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s vast musical output from the unique perspective of specialists in the field, all professors at the University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt leads the first session with an overview of Mozart’s life, focusing particularly on the music for, and inspired by, his association with the Freemasons. In another session Dr. Rosenblatt will continue last year’s discussion of Mozart’s operas. Subsequent sessions will be led by Brian Luce, Professor of Flute, who will...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Roger Nichols

This course traces the often-changing experiences American Indians had from just before the War for Independence to the twentieth century. It will focus on how they dealt with the expanding nation and its pioneer citizens. Their tactics varied from contact, cooperation, and competition to conflict with the newcomers. Major differences in how the two races saw their lands and resources explain the violence that resulted. The U.S. lacked any consistent policy for its treatment of the tribes; and even when its goals seemed humane, their...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 18 - November 15, 2016
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Richard Poss

This survey of astronomy begins here on Earth and heads outward to the ends of the observable universe. We will explore the Sun, the Moon, and the most interesting planets in our stellar neighborhood. Comets, asteroids, the Kuiper Belt, and the Oort Cloud are the next topics we will consider as we assess our solar-system environment. From our local solar system we then move to star formation and the nature of the Milky Way galaxy. Neutron stars, debris disks, supernovas, black holes, and dark matter follow.

Are we alone? How do you...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. September 29 - December 8, 2016. No class on November 24.
Steward Observatory N 210, 933 N. Cherry Avenue
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

This course steps back from polls and punditry to reflect on broader historical developments. It considers women in politics, divisions between rich and poor, and ethnic minorities becoming the new majority. To deepen our analyses, we will consider writings on politics and ethics, including some that shaped the founding of the republic as well as recent research on political cognition and moral imagination. That research has brought us back to Hume’s view that “reason is a slave of the passions,” something abundantly apparent in the current...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. September 29 - December 8, 2016. No class on November 24.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Bella Vivante

We initiate a year of exploring Homer by reading his scintillating epic poem presenting a few days near the Trojan War’s end: The Iliad. While the poem highlights battle and military matters, human complexities also emerge: conflict between military and domestic realms; women as war prizes or prized family members; the role of gods; concepts of heroism; ways of warfare; the oral tradition; creation of poetry; and more. The aim is to appreciate from multiple perspectives The Iliad’s exquisite poetry and its multilayered...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 29 - December 15, 2016. No class on October 27 and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Donna Guy

Stereotypes of dictators, machismo, endemic drug violence, and staunch Catholicism are often applied to Latin America. Countries as different as Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil are lumped together despite varying ethnicities and economics. How can we tell the difference between the myths and the realities? How can a little island like Cuba so enrage the United States? This ten-week course approaches these questions topically. Lectures and selected readings explore topics such as the decline of Catholicism, democracy, the role of Jews and...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 28 - December 14, 2016. No class on October 12 and November 23.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Lynda Zwinger

In this class we will begin to see for ourselves what James contributed to the art to which he devoted his entire life. The course will include lectures on the history and form of the English and American novel, Henry James’s life and times, selected passages from James’s prefaces to the famous New York edition, and an introduction to foundational formal and theoretical concepts we will need for our exploration. James wrote for many kinds of readers: those looking for a good story, his fellow artists, and for his ideal reader—who, not...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. September 27 - December 13, 2016. No class on October 25 and November 22.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Albrecht Classen

Medieval literature was not simply doom and gloom. It also had a strong sense of hope, happiness, and love, embodied best perhaps in the Holy Grail and courtly love. As in all other literary eras, we can also find many tragic or religious works. But one of the hallmarks of medieval literature, at least in its secular form, is the search for happiness, individual fulfillment, and love, all perhaps best captured by the term “quest.” Think of the quest for the grail, quest for the social ideal of a courtly knight, and quest for love. Happiness...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 26 - December 12, 2016. No class on October 3 and November 21.
Dorothy Rubel/Humanities Seminars Room, 1508 E. Helen Street
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

This course steps back from polls and punditry to reflect on broader historical developments. It considers women in politics, divisions between rich and poor, and ethnic minorities becoming the new majority. To deepen our analyses, we will consider writings on politics and ethics, including some that shaped the founding of the republic as well as recent research on political cognition and moral imagination. That research has brought us back to Hume’s view that “reason is a slave of the passions,” something abundantly apparent in the current...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM September 30 - December 16, 2016. No class on November 11 and November 25.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Doug Weiner

The Bolshevik Revolution and the Soviet Union played defining roles in the twentieth century, yet are poorly understood. To help us to better grasp their history, this course will integrate the best scholarship and currently available evidence to provide a broad picture of Soviet history that makes the most sense today. We will begin with the context of the Bolshevik seizure of power. Among other topics, the course will cover the relationship of Marxism to Soviet ideology and practice, the rise of Stalin, the Soviet economy, ethnic policy,...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 3 - August 24, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

This seminar will focus on the ideal political state as it is represented in More's Utopia (1516) and Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726). There are no incontrovertibly valid answers to the question of what constitutes the ideal state and how it may be realized, and neither Utopia nor Gulliver Travels pretends to advance them. The works are fictional, and the methods are literary—a Platonic dialogue and a prose satire. Each work advances two arguments, one that affirms the ideal political state and...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 2 - August 30, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

In this course Professor David Soren presents four of his most significant accomplishments from his fifty-year career in archaeology (Oxford University has cited his work as among the fifty greatest archaeological discoveries of all time). First, he will discuss his excavations at Kourion, Cyprus, where he uncovered a Greco-Roman city buried by the devastating earthquake of July 21, 365, which triggered tsunamis so powerful they demolished the Greek coast. Next, he will tell the story of the agony of Roman emperor Augustus, which caused him...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS July 7 - July 28, 2016 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes has undoubtedly profoundly influenced the techniques, form, and meaning of modern art. From his innovations that revolutionized making etchings to the form and content of his historical and allegorical painting, Goya’s influence on artistic creation is immense. This course will study that influence and examine how Goya’s view of the world and his thought emerged. We will see how his paintings and etchings evolved into a systematic criticism of the antiquated nature of Spain’s institutions and way of life. We...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS June 29 - July 27, 2016 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

Sherlock Holmes never actually said “Elementary, my dear Watson!” There have been more than 60 Holmes films, including one in which he is portrayed by a mouse, one by a dog, and at least one as a woman. Arthur Conan Doyle, the original author, was a medical doctor, a freemason, and a believer in spiritualism and clairvoyance. These and other curious facts will be explored (or should we say “detected“?) in this seminar, as we examine a cross-section of the many adaptations of Doyle’s iconic detective. We will begin by reading many of the...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 7 - June 28, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Eleni Hasaki

What were the key technologies and major technical achievements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines two crucial and interconnected industries: ceramics and bronze-working. The two crafts are often discussed separately, but in this course we will focus on their deeply rooted connections. We will examine the qualities of the raw materials used, the technological know-how of potters and bronze-smiths, the pyrotechnological principles of their kilns and furnaces, as well as the social, political, economic, and cultural milieus...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. June 1- June 22, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Tatum

The Civil War was not only pivotal moment in American history, it was a key moment in the development of American music. Even as the war was ripping the country in half, the military was bringing together soldiers from differing ethnic and musical backgrounds. The resulting comingling of instruments, songs, and styles has been called the first recognizably “American” folk music.

This is not a history class or a music class, but rather is an examination of the connection between music, history, and place. It is a class about how a...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 5 - May 26, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Byrne

While many people living in Tucson and its surroundings are experienced outdoor aficionados, many lack an understanding of our near neighbors--those plants and animals that live close to us in our urban environment. Certainly we can choose to ignore the flora and fauna of our desert community and function reasonably well. Our lives are enriched, however, if we take the time to develop a better understanding of our companion species. Developing this awareness/knowledge ?is the goal of this course. Using ecology, the scientific analysis and...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 3- May 31, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Monica J. Casper

Superman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, Batman, Captain America, Green Lantern, Iron Man, Black Widow--the list of America’s superheroes is long. Comic books, TV, and cinema have long built up the appeal of superheroes, and they remain popular. Embodiments of cultural meanings, social practices, and political imaginaries, superheroes tell us stories about ourselves. Historically, representations of superheroes have been connected to national security and the Cold War, changing gender roles, racial stereotypes, and environmental issues. In this...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. March 1 - April 5, 2016. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: George Davis, Peter Kresan

The Colorado Plateau is a vibrant tectonic province renowned for its landscapes, geology, and beauty. It is in effect a living, dynamic museum of natural history, with its 3D “displays” covering nearly two billion years of history. Through lectures, photography, and choice rock and fossil specimens we will “see” the sedimentary strata as records of ancient landscapes and seascapes, and “read” earth deformation and volcanism as expressions of plate tectonics in action. Moreover, we will come to know this raw, exposed canyon country as an...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Irene Bald Romano

Art has often been plundered or stolen during times of war, occupation, or even peace. This course explores the historical, political, and legal framework of specific moments when art has been taken. The class focuses on how art has been used for propagandistic purposes, as pawns in high-stakes politics, or as a “cash cow” in the legitimate or black market. It also looks at ethical issues of museum collecting, the debate over cultural property, and the dilemma of recovery or repatriation of stolen art. Case studies include the looting of...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. February 1 - 29, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Gibbs

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 29 - April 8, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

This course encompasses Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, and King Lear. While addressing ourselves to such matters as language and theatricality, we shall approach plays primarily from the perspectives of plot and characterization. This line of inquiry will enable us to focus on the psychology and morality of the tragic protagonists and at the same time take into account the shape of the plays' action. Thereby we shall be able to move beyond the misguided...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 28 - April 7, 2016. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

The first great work of Western literature, Homer’s phenomenal epic The Iliad, sings of the Trojan War, its horrors and its glories. To the ancient Greeks war was a fact of life. Proving oneself in battle was fundamental to becoming a man. Despite modern Western beliefs that we can resolve conflicts diplomatically, war still confronts us. Today, facing an implacably savage enemy leaves many conflicted about the morality of warfare.

Greek warfare differed from modern practices: unquestioningly accepting that war was necessary...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 28 - April 7, 2016. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Leslie P. Tolbert

The human brain, guiding our every thought and action, is as complex as anything we know. Its almost unimaginable complexity arises from minute interconnections between tens of billions of nerve cells. If we could map every connection among the cells, we still would have only a rough foundation for understanding brain function, because those connections are changing every moment of our lives. They are recording our experiences, our emotions, our plans for the future, and they are constantly repairing disruption and injury. Evidence is...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 26 - February 23, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Cosgrove

Why study the Tudors? This dynasty has a special place in English history because it presided over the transition from medieval to modern (or so most historians, but not all, argue). In addition, the major figures, especially Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, have long fascinated historians and the general public. This period also contained the Reformation in England that separated the English church from the papacy in Rome.

The Tudors have transcended the sphere of history, for they are now the rock stars of contemporary media. In movies...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 25 - April 4, 2016. No class on March 14.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Dante’s Purgatorio, as is well known, is not a standalone text; it is simply the second part of The Divine Comedy. In this course we will deal with Dante’s views on redemption and salvation as represented in his Purgatorio. Our focus will be the nature of sin: How it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony). And how human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with divine assistance). We will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work,...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. November 5 - December 3, 2015. No class on November 26, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

Few composers have been as prolific in so many genres as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. In this course we will survey a portion of this vast output from the unique perspective of specialists in the field, all professors at the University of Arizona Fred Fox School of Music. The first session will be led by Jay Rosenblatt and will offer an overview of Mozart’s life, covering such topics as his years as a child prodigy, his difficulties with the prince-archbishop of Salzburg, and his final decade in Vienna. He will also introduce the class to the...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. November 2 - 30, 2015. No class on November 23, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Paul Ivey

This five-week course examines concepts that have become increasingly relevant to contemporary artists working in a variety of media over the past 50 years. It concentrates on more recent art, understood against the backdrop of modern art movements. In this class we will look at some of the broader theories, practices, and institutions that have emerged in the contemporary art world. Subjects include aura, the digital, photography, monumental and unmonumental sculpture, new image painting, time, science, the environment, personal and...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 30 - December 4, 2015. No class on November 27, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steven D. Martinson

Faust is alive and well. His emanations appear in literature, art, music, film, and cyberspace. Not only Adam and Eve but also Faust ate of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. So he has excited the human imagination for centuries. But who was this mysterious alchemist or learned academician who dared transgress the borders of accepted knowledge and revel in the world of darkness that the Church condemned and warned against?

We will look for him on the Internet, in Marlowe’s Tragical History of Dr. Johann...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2015. No class on November 23, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

What was the relationship of ancient Greek culture to early Christianity? This seminar will open with two topics of significance in the early development of Christianity: the image (or icon) and the Jesus story itself. The course will also include lectures on the tragic paradigm in Greek poetry (Homer and Sophocles) and a discussion of the soul in Plato's Phaedo. Then we trace the Hellenization of the ancient Mediterranean, beginning with the conquests of Alexander the Great and their influence on the diffusion of Hellenic...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 1- December 10, 2015. No class on November 26, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Meg Lota Brown

Many of Shakespeare’s most powerful, intelligent, and subversive characters are female. How were such vividly complex roles constructed in a culture that legally defined women as property on the grounds of their intellectual and moral inferiority? Given the early modern imperatives of feminine silence, chastity, and obedience, how is it that women impel Shakespeare’s plots, orchestrate conflicts, and—in many instances— impose “resolutions”?

This course will address the social and historical contexts of Shakespeare's women and how the...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 600 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. September 30 - October 28, 2015 (EVENING CLASS!) Please note that this course is NOT held in the Rubel Room in the Poetry Center, but in room # 410 of the Modern Languages Building instead. Convenient parking is available in the Second Street Parking Garage for $5.00 per class.
Modern Languages 410
Professor: Laura C. Berry

How can we best know the past, and how much can we really know of it?

This interdisciplinary course will seek answers to these questions in relation to mid-Victorian England. We will read primary material published around 1859, providing a “snapshot” of a particularly important moment in the middle of one of the world’s most interesting centuries. The readings will include two novels and diverse original texts drawn from political, economic, scientific, social, and popular writing. Expect authors as well-known as Karl Marx and as new...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. September 30 - December 16, 2015. No class on November 11 and 25, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Irène d'Almeida

By studying literature and cinema, students in this course will learn about various African cultures, traditions, and institutions. The class will show how French-speaking African writers and film-makers use literature and films to build narratives concerning African cultures and societies. At the same time, their work offers a counternarrative to persistent images of life in Africa. Our focus will be on West Africa, which forms a cultural entity, and three themes that correspond to three historical periods: first, “Ancient Africa,” with an...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 30 - December 16, 2015. No class on November 11 and 25, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Susan A. Crane

This course addresses the twentieth-century genocide that was the Holocaust, the attempted annihilation of European Jews and other designated racial and political opponents led by the Third Reich in Germany. We will review the horrific events of the Holocaust and explore the current scholarly understanding of this history: What does it mean to remember the Holocaust today?

The Holocaust continues to be relevant, and not only for surviving victims and perpetrators. We will consider how and why the Holocaust has been remembered in the...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. September 29 - December 15, 2015. No class on November 10 and November 24, 2015.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Tatum

In the 1800s the newly created United States of America was seized by what was labeled “Manifest Destiny”--a deep-seated drive to expand from coast to coast. This drive encountered several obstacles, ranging from the challenges presented by geography and travel to the fact that large segments of land were already claimed by America’s indigenous people. The impulse toward a unified continent was also derailed by the Civil War and the division between the states. The military played a significant role in conquering the West and, obviously, in...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 7, 14, 21, 28, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

This seminar begins by putting Dubliners and Portrait of an Artist into their social and literary contexts. We will then spend two meetings on each work. Though in different genres—the short story and the education novel—they are companion pieces in significant ways. Dubliners illustrates the oppression of Irish Catholics by British Protestants and by Irish Catholics themselves through the strictures of the institutionalized Church. A Portrait tells the tale of an individual who refuses to submit to...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

Join anthropologist and classical archaeologist David Soren for an overview of ancient Rome. Moving from the Early Iron Age to the so-called fall of the Roman Empire, the course will also look at the mysterious people known as the Etruscans. It will delve into Republican Rome’s development into an international powerhouse, drawing cultural inspiration from the ancient Greeks. The rise of Imperial Rome features propaganda-master Octavian, conqueror of Antony and Cleopatra, and heir to Julius Caesar. Finally, the class looks at the latest...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

Virginia Woolf famously said that Middlemarch is “one of the few English novels written for grown-up ­people.”  It is also frequently said to be the best nineteenth-century novel written in English and the most perfect example of classic British realism. Its capacious scope, depth of compassion, and careful attention to the details of human experience transcend its Victorian origins; it continues to attract ardent devotees almost 150 years after its publication. In this course we will examine the language of Middlemarch...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Herbert Schneidau

What's really in the Bible? As opposed to what we've been told by well-meaning but often not well-informed parents, clergy, and others? This course provides an innovative look at many instructive and amusing aspects of this most consequential book in Western culture. It examines clichés and received wisdom about the text, with a view to replacing widely accepted readings with students’ own more informed and insightful revisionings of the book. Not your average Bible reading class, this course aims to explore many controversial and contested...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Eleni Hasaki

What were the key technologies and major technical achievements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines crucial technological wonders from ancient Greece, focusing on: temple construction (the Parthenon), the mastery of fire for bronzes (the Delphi Charioteer) and ceramics (the Euphronios Vase), and the transformation of marble into sculptures (the Aphrodite of Melos). We will look at the qualities of the raw materials used, the technological know-how of ancient craftspeople, the scientific principles of their work, the...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Poss

Can a movie probe more deeply into theology than other works? Can it show the strengths and weaknesses of religious thought more directly, more dramatically? This seminar probes theology and film, examining movies with strong Christian themes. We will use film criticism and literary and art theories to look at and interpret movies that address the spiritual dimensions of life. The class will study classic directors like Buñuel, Pasolini, and Zeffirelli, tease out new meaning from familiar texts such as A Man for All Seasons and...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 30, Feb. 6, 13, 20, 27, March 6, 13, 27, April 3, 10, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Brian Silverstein

Is Turkey in Europe or the Middle East? Is this a question of geography, history, politics, or culture? This course explores all those sides of Turkey since the late 19th-century empire, focusing on the republican era after 1923. Turkey is one of the world’s most populous Muslim countries, a parliamentary democracy, a NATO member, and a candidate to join the European Union. The country is also not a postcolony--the Republic of Turkey emerged directly from the ruins of the Ottoman Empire. The seminars will be presented by Dr....

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 29, Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 12, 26, April 9, and April 16, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Anna Dornhaus

What is intelligence? What differentiates humans from other animals? This course explores the evolution of cognition in humans and other species, and discusses how science investigates these questions. Why are humans such a unique species on earth--or are we? Why we are so good at solving some problems and yet fail so often at solving others? Research in evolutionary biology has a lot of answers to questions about why animals behave the way they do, and we will examine how this applies to our own lives. We will also touch on the underlying...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 11, 25, April 1, 8, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Charles Tatum

The short story has held a prominent place in Latin American literature for at least 200 years, but it is only within the past few decades that it has become widely known in translation. The course will use the short story as a vehicle to introduce some of Latin America’s best-known writers, including Nobel Laureates Miguel Angel Asturias (Guatemala), Gabriel García Márquez (Colombia), and Mario Vargas Llosa (Peru), as well as Jorge.Luis Borges (Argentina) and Isabel Allende (Chile and the U.S.). The course will draw on their short stories...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 28, Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 11, 25, April 1, 8, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mary Beth Haralovich

The “scandalous female genre” has long had box-office value and cultural presence. This seminar explores the history of such women in films. We will first discuss genre conventions: how film style and storytelling present and comment on scandalous behavior. We then will explore how film-industry conditions permit and encourage portraying scandalous females. Each week we will engage a key question of interpretation: whether the character’s scandalous behavior is shameful, or whether it reveals and critiques gender norms and social-cultural...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 24, 31, April 7, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

Perennially fascinating, ancient Greek mythology has inspired and continues to inform creative activity from “highbrow” literature to popular media. This course will explore major mythological events and characters beginning with the creation tale, which features a succession of generations of gods embroiled in gender and generational conflict. We will examine the gods’ importance in ancient Greek ritual and cultural life and then hero tales—Herakles, Oedipus, the Trojan War cycle, and more. By appreciating the diversity and complexities of...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 27, Feb. 3. 10, 17, 24, March 3, 10, 24, 31, April 7, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Barbara Kosta

Berlin, capital of the Weimar Republic between the two World Wars, was one of the most exciting cities in Europe--the place of the most radical experimentation in the visual and performing arts, in mass entertainment and theater, in literature and architecture. Berlin was a laboratory of modernity. While the cultural stage was vibrant and intoxicating, the celebrated roaring twenties also was haunted by the shell shock of World War I and by economic instability, social upheaval, and political turmoil. This class explores avant-garde...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, and 16, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: John Wilson

The Dance—as Homer named it—is always an expression of the ideas, traditions, and values of the society that creates it, whether spiritual, recreational, or artistic in form. The body in motion is both the mode of expression and the meaning of the Dance. In this course we explore the correlations between the body image as defined by science, the self image as described by psychology, and the human image as expressed in our dances. In the process we refer to the styles of depicting the human body in motion in visual art and literature...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Jan. 26, Feb. 2, 9, 16, 23, March 2, 9, 23, 30, April 6, 2015
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine Comedy, Inferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization of his hell, from lesser to greater sins, the numerous historical personages and references in it, and its implicit theology. We will also look at Dante’s narrative, discussing how the actions of his characters and their...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 to 4:00 P.M. Nov. 13, 20, Dec. 4, and 11, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

Ludwig van Beethoven was one of the great masters of the Classical and Romantic eras in music, and no genre summarizes his achievement better than the string quartet. This course will examine 16 works spread evenly throughout his early, middle, and late styles. The first six quartets reveal his consolidation of Mozart’s and Haydn’s techniques, the five middle quartets demonstrate his expansion of form and mastery of harmony, and the final five quartets, along with the “Grosse Fuge,” invite us into the experimental realm of the deaf and...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 - 3:00 p.m. Oct. 27, Nov. 3, 10, and 17, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Paul Ivey

This course examines the issues, artists, and theories surrounding the rise of Postmodernism in the visual arts from 1970 into the twenty-first century. We will explore the emergence of pluralism in the visual arts against a backdrop of the rise of the global economy. And we will look at the “crisis” of postmodern culture, which critiques ideas of history, progress, and personal and cultural identities, as well as embracing irony and parody, pastiche, nostalgia, mass or “low” culture, and multiculturalism.

In a chronological fashion...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 17, Dec. 1, 8, 15, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Lynda Zwinger

One of the most popular and beloved novelists in the English language, Jane Austen wrote novels that have beguiled and challenged readers for two centuries.

For some, Austen is our beloved "Aunt Jane," chatting with us about tea parties, excursions in pony phaetons, and ill-advised epistolary relationships. For others, she is a subversive ironist whose piercing vision of human foibles offers us reflections relevant to our own lives and times.

How did this seventh child of a provincial clergyman, a single woman who lived an...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 2, 16, 23, 30, Nov. 6, 13, 20, Dec. 4, 11, and 18, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Patrick Baliani

The tragicomedy genre, so prevalent in our day, has actually been evolving for many centuries. While one can take a primarily aesthetic approach to any genre--what makes comedy comedy?--here we will include a fuller consideration of history, stressing the social, political, and philosophical contexts of the particular plays.

How does a certain “age” or “culture” perceive tragicomedy? What are the roots of this standpoint, and how does it evolve across cultural and temporal barriers? How do interpretation and performance affect our...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Nov. 5, 12, 19, Dec. 3, and 10, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Charles Scruggs

According to George Kennan, the Great War was “the seminal event of the Twentieth Century.” The war triggered both the Russian Revolution and the Irish Rebellion, and ended by toppling monarchies and destroying empires.

But perhaps the “shock of the new” that most surprised was the horror of modern, mechanized warfare. T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land and Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front are probably the most famous postwar texts, but they are only two of many brilliant literary works the war...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 -4:00 p.m. Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4, 18, Dec. 2, 9, and 16, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

The city has been the motor of progress in modernity and the crucible of many of the social movements that have contested the darker underside of the modern. This seminar will explore how cities came to reside at the center of the modern project, how they have been transformed over time, and what those transformations might mean. It will also examine how the work of artists, most importantly film makers, react to the urban process, and how their creations contribute to understanding the complex dynamic that forms the culture and politics of...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon Sept. 30, Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28, Nov. 4, 18, Dec. 2, 9, and 16, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Doug Weiner

How did our globalized economy and international culture come to be?

The “Rise of the West” idea has long suggested something innately superior about “Western civilization.” But there are better grounded ways than appeals to cultural or racial superiority to explain the emergence of today’s world, based as it is on European economic power, market logic, science and technology, and to a significant extent, culture. We will learn the central roles of biogeography, epidemiology, patterns of trade, geopolitics, and pure accident in the “...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - noon August 6, 13, 20, 27, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed.  Such approaches will bring into focus the education of the main characters through the trials of their experiences. While the novels conform to the comedic mode, in which the principals ultimately realize their...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Tatum

The role of tribal governments within the United States is not well understood, largely because most schools do not teach it. This course is designed to fill that gap. Each class will explore a different aspect of how tribal governments fit within the federal system. The first session looks at how historic and modern structures of tribal governments relate to the U.S. government. The next class focuses on issues of cultural property and sacred sites. The third meeting dispels the myth that tribal economic development consists primarily of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

Join University of Arizona Regents Professor David Soren for a survey of the life and work of four great directors. First up is Fritz Lang whose collaboration with wife Thea Von Harbou led to the recently fully rediscovered science fiction epic Metropolis. Next the enigmatic Busby Berkeley is featured, stressing his importance as a creator of the Hollywood musical look of the 1930s and showing some of his lesser known but still amazing work, including the kaleidoscopic color images of The Gang's All Here, with Alice Faye....

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

The detective tale, born of the work of Edgar Alan Poe and altered by Dashiell Hammett,  evolved over time in the hands of international masters such as Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Andrea Camilleri, and Donna Leon. Our examination helps identify the qualities that provide this genre with its enduring allure, and explores how modern practitioners play with the form and adapt it to the writer’s needs in ways that continue to fuel reader interest. Through the reading of the required primary texts and important recommended...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

Bleak House is often said to be Dickens’s greatest novel; certainly it is one of his most compelling and enjoyable. We will spend four intense and rewarding weeks reading this masterpiece in its original installments, paying close attention to themes of loss, law, social class, secrecy, and inheritance. We will also explore Dickens’s astonishing use of language by way of close reading. Two critical lenses will guide us: the historical view and a psychological perspective. In addition to what I hope will be a lively discussion of...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Daniel Asia

In four sessions we will look at works of art music from each of the decades of the latter half of the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the act and art of listening, and how to know what to listen for. We will explore the qualities of the music itself and strategies of understanding the music, bringing us deeper satisfaction and appreciation, and thus giving us a stronger relationship to the greatness expressed by the soul and mind of genius. Some works and composers will be familiar to you and some not: Copland, Bernstein, Messiaen...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Fitch

Forget the rose-in-the-mouth cliché, and discover how tango relates to art, activism, and even therapy. We will analyze films, advertising, theater, poetry, art, documentaries, material culture, digital art forms, and public protests to examine the production, consumption, and diffusion of meaning found in global cultural narratives related to Argentine tango. Students will learn how tango was used to champion women’s rights and modernization in Turkey in the early 20th century, and how Jewish prisoners used it as a symbol of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 30 until April 10, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jerry Hogle

England during the reign of Victoria is famous for industrial, scientific, and technological advances, as well as sexual repression. But it was also an era when the ghost story – and its extensions in longer fictions during one of the heydays of the English novel – flourished in print just as old traditions about the spirit world were being called into question by the many supposed “progresses” of the day. This seminar sets out to explain both the wide range of ghost stories during the time before and after Charles Dickens’ “A...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 27 until April 7, 2014 (no class on March 17 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

In this cultural excursion we will explore literary and artistic highlights of the diverse cultures that have flourished in the concise landmass of ancient Anatolia (modern Turkey) —Paleolithic and Neolithic habitation, Hittites, Amazons, Assyrians, Hebrew Biblical, Troy, Phrygia, Lydia, Lycia, Ionian Greeks, Roman, early Christian, Byzantine, Ottoman. Textbooks provide historical background; and art, architecture, poetry, philosophy, and other writings offer insights into the distinctive qualities that make these cultures memorable and...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 24 until April 4, 2014 (no class on March 21)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: George Davis, Peter Kresan

The Colorado Plateau is a sublime geologic province renowned for its breathtaking rock formations and landscapes. During our exploration of the Colorado Plateau, we will descend the Grand Canyon, ascend the Grand Staircase, cross the Escalante, explore Canyonlands, experience the Four Corners, absorb the Painted Desert, and ultimately complete our journey on the San Francisco Peaks. Panoramic and aerial images will aid in storytelling and help frame points of primary emphasis. Along the way we will sample some of the art, poetry, and...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 23 until March 27, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Alain-Philippe Durand

What makes the French laugh? Why do the French like Jerry Lewis (and other comedians such as Charles Chaplin) so much?  Why does Hollywood remake so many French comedies? This interactive seminar responds to these questions by examining the comic and humor techniques used in French cinema throughout the years. In addition to watching and analyzing several representative films from different periods, participants will study the cultural and historic roots of French humor and laughter throughout history. Representative films (with English...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAY 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. January 22 until April 23, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break). Optional screenings of movies in the Rubel room on February 12, 19, and March 5.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steven D. Martinson

The youthful interests of Friedrich Nietzsche permeate his later work, for which the critical-creative writer is most widely known. We will first consider his early experiences, memories, illustrations, piano compositions, poetry, and prose, including his first major published writing, The Birth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Music, and university lectures on the pre-Socratics. The goal is to render a new and different reading that challenges contemporary perceptions, images, and conceptions of one of the most influential and...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 22 until April 2, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

There Is Nothing Like a Dame! celebrates the women of Broadway who wrote the scripts, composed the songs, penned the lyrics, designed, directed, choreographed, and starred in classics of the American musical theater.
 
The seminar introduces the women of the Golden Age of musical theater who paved the way for the women now working on new musicals for the millennium. Revel in archival performances by the great ladies of Broadway past and cheer for the new divas of the Great White Way who are creating musical memories for...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
SECTION FULL -- TUESDAYS 1:00 until 4:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

There Is Nothing Like a Dame! celebrates the women of Broadway who wrote the scripts, composed the songs, penned the lyrics, designed, directed, choreographed, and starred in classics of the American musical theater.
 
The seminar introduces the women of the Golden Age of musical theater who paved the way for the women now working on new musicals for the millennium. Revel in archival performances by the great ladies of Broadway past and cheer for the new divas of the Great White Way who are creating musical memories for...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
SECTION FULL -- TUESDAYS 1:00 until 4:00 p.m. January 21 until April 1, 2014 (no class on March 18 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

The year 2013 will commemorate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Giuseppe Verdi (1813–1901), and over four sessions we will survey his vast output of operas. The first lecture will provide an overview of Verdi’s life and career. We will also consider his most important predecessors (Rossini, Bellini, and Donizetti) and the relationship of their music to his as seen in his earliest operas. Subsequent classes will continue the chronological survey, with in-depth examination of selected scenes using video clips and recordings. Finally, we...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. October 14; December 2, 9, 16, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Meg Lota Brown

John Milton was one of England’s most controversial, celebrated, and reviled writers. As the course title suggests, we will study Milton’s poetry and prose within the context of the many revolutions in which he was a major figure: revolutions in politics, theology, poetics, and philosophy. One of our goals will be to examine not only how Milton–and the culture in which he was embedded–constructed meaning but also why it is important for us to undertake such an examination. We will read works from many of the different genres in which Milton...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 4 until December 13, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Michael Gill

Utilitarianism is the idea that one ought to perform those actions that produce the greatest happiness for the greatest numbers, which is one of the most important views of morality ever developed. In this course we will explore Utilitarianism’s philosophical origins, its influences on politics and literature, and recent attempts to show that contemporary neuroscience and psychology validate it. We will read works of the philosophers David Hume, Adam Smith, and John Stuart Mill, and excerpts from the novels of Dickens and Dostoevsky. The...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00-3:00 p.m. October 3 until December 12, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabio Lanza

This course analyzes the evolution of Chinese urban space to show how both Chinese people and outsiders viewed the evolving form of the city as the symbol of China’s progress, its position in the world, and its internal social dynamics. From the walls of the Forbidden City to the Western buildings of Shanghai, from the massive squares and the drab structures of communism to the incredible expansion in the last thirty years, we will investigate the shifting meanings of architecture and city life. We will look at how such notions as...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 3 until December 12, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

This seminar will take students through a reading of the whole of Homer’s Iliad.  The first two weeks will be devoted to historical conditions around the work, including discussion of the nature of oral composition and aesthetic aspects of oral epic.  The remaining eight weeks will be devoted to a consecutive reading of the poem, with the focus on such issues as the relations between the gods and human beings, between one human being and another, the making of the hero, destiny, choice, free will, and the tragic consequences of a...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon October 2 until December 11, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Lanin Gyurko

Join Professor Lanin Gyurko as he explores the life and films of one of the greatest film directors, Alfred Hitchcock, master of suspense, mystery, and intrigue. Films from the silent and sound eras, in black and white and color, and biopics will be discussed. The course will highlight both the films’ spellbinding content and their use of dazzling cinematic techniques, as well as Hitchcock's adroit utilization of star power--from Joan Fontaine and Laurence Olivier to Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, and Kim Novak. Films that will be...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. October 1 until December 10, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas Price

Who are the Turks? Where did they come from, and how did they help build the Islamic world? What role did they play in the Crusades? A major world power for nearly 500 years, how did they rule so much of Europe before finally taking Constantinople in 1453, and with what consequences?

More recently, what role have Turks--both Ottomans and post-Ottomans--played in modern history? As the "Sick Man of Europe" for most of the 19th century, they provided fuel for the western imagination in literature, architecture, food, and fashion--not...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 1 until December 17, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Albrecht Classen

This course will focus on some of the central and most significant texts from the Middle Ages which have withstood the test of time and continue to exert a tremendous fascination on us today. We will explore what some of the fundamental issues in human life have always been and how responses to them in the past prove to be most illuminating for us today. Some of those issues are: meaning of fortune/misfortune, happiness in human life, experience of death, loss of love, love itself, heroism and tragedy, friendship, gift giving, exploration...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. September 30 until December 16, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown. (Henry IV, Part 2)

Of his ten histories, the four interrelated plays forming the second tetralogy are among Shakespeare's greatest theatrical achievements. These works, which deal with the period of 1400 to 1420, include Richard II, Henry IV Part 1, Henry IV Part 2, and Henry V. They feature a rich variety of characters: the tragic Richard II, the ruthlessly ambitious and ultimately remorseful Henry IV, the heroic Henry V, and the brilliantly comic Falstaff. The...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. August 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Using a facing-page translation, we will deal with the climax of Dante’s Divine Comedy.  While Inferno depicts sin and evil, and Purgatorio portrays redemption, Paradiso illustrates the possibility of transcendence.  Not only does a blessed soul understand the transcendent universe, but that person also transcends her or his fallen human nature.  In this seminar we will cover the numerous historical personages and references in the work, and discuss its cosmological and theological basis.  Dante’s ...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

Join anthropologist/classical archaeologist David Soren in a survey of the art and archaeology of ancient Rome. This course will highlight the major wonders of the Roman world from the 8th century B.C. to the 6th century A.D., including the historical truth behind Rome's alleged founders Romulus and Remus, the frightening demonology of the Etruscans, the remarkable seven-terraced sanctuary of Praeneste, and the unique construction of the Pantheon. Dr. Soren has recently been assigned to direct a miniseries on ancient Rome, and he will...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

What’s the value of a good argument?  That question is not merely rhetorical.  For the sake of argument, we will reassess the classical opposition of rhetoric and philosophy that was first established by Plato.  Ironically, it was not Socrates’s student but a student of the Sophists who founded the humanities upon a skepticism about received truths.  In our first class we will explore the sophistic art of deliberating upon the uncertainties of civic life, and in our second we will read Plato’s highly rhetorical attacks on rhetoric.  Then we...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: J. Pat Willerton

Contemporary Russia continues to search for a post-Soviet national identity:  what Russians refer to as their country’s “national idea.”  The return to the presidency of Vladimir Putin signifies that the country’s most historically significant leader since Stalin reassumes the decisive role as Russia continues to wrestle with its identity, sociopolitical goals, and position in the world community.  We focus on political system and institution building, elites, and socioeconomic change as we consider an emergent 21st -century Russian “...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Endre Stavang

Our global environmental problems need attention from almost all legal disciplines, including constitutional law, property law, natural resources regulation, and international and comparative law.  This timely class presents core issues in environmental law – broadly construed -- based on cutting-edge research by faculty at the College of Law. The issues are: how environmental law can be grounded in water law (Glennon); environmental law's constraints and competing concerns within the context of  international trade (Gantz); how migration...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

In 2013 we celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of Richard Wagner (1813–1883). Perhaps no other composer so changed the course of music history through the way he reconceived the nature of opera and the way he stretched the boundaries of tonality. Many composers who followed found themselves swept up in these new approaches to form and harmony.
 
Four classes will consider Wagner in terms of both biography and music. The first two will provide an overview of Wagner’s life, including his background and education, his...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m January 28, February 4, 11, 18, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Barbara Kosta

Beginning with the German cinema of the 1920s and ending with contemporary films, this course provides a historical overview of influential German movies, major periods, and key filmmakers.
 
In the 1920s German cinema was one of Hollywood’s fiercest competitors, and the Ufa, Germany’s premier film studio, produced a body of innovative films that would become classics. Movies such as Nosferatu and Metropolis continue to influence filmmaking practices internationally. We will begin with a look at the cinema of...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon January 28, February 4, 11, 18, 25, March 4, 18, April 1, 8, 15, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Poss

The Renaissance begins in Italy and is an invention of the Florentines. This seminar is an examination of the art, architecture, sculpture, literature, and history of the republic of Florence during its period of greatest importance to world history. From the mid-14th to the late 15th century, Florence was the center of a cultural movement that has become the definition of the modern world.
 
We will begin by examining the first glimmerings in the frescoes of Giotto, the...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, March 1, 8, 22, 29, April 5, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mike Lippman

This course will cover the rich and seminal history and literature of fifth-century Greece; the most creative and productive period in all human history. Our course will particularly focus on Athens, the world's first democracy, from which most of the liberal arts trace their origins.
 
These amazing developments began with the Battle of Marathon in 490 BCE, the clash between democratic Athens and the vast invading Persian Empire. From there we will trace how the victorious Athenians built up their power then fought with Sparta...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

Poetry is capable of saving us; it is a perfectly possible
                               means of overcoming chaos.

                                                    --I. A. Richards
                         Words for music perhaps.
                                                             --W. B. Yeats
 
Very likely the earliest form of literary expression, the lyric poem is a relatively short statement in verse, usually in the first person, and deals with emotionally...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will explore the creation of the American musical theater and trace the influence of minstrelsy, vaudeville, burlesque, revue, and operetta in the evolution of this unique American form of lyric theater. From Stephen Foster to Stephen Sondheim, the course will chart the development of America's great, original gift to the world: the musical.
 
Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will toast the tunesmiths and poets of Broadway whose collective genius created the golden age of the American musical theater. The course...

Course Time and Dates:
Morning section: TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Afternoon section: TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will explore the creation of the American musical theater and trace the influence of minstrelsy, vaudeville, burlesque, revue, and operetta in the evolution of this unique American form of lyric theater. From Stephen Foster to Stephen Sondheim, the course will chart the development of America's great, original gift to the world: the musical.
 
Gotta Sing! Gotta Dance! will toast the tunesmiths and poets of Broadway whose collective genius created the golden age of the American musical theater. The course...

Course Time and Dates:
Morning section: TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Afternoon section: TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 22, 29, February 5, 12, 19, 26, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2013
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Charlene Kampfe

The percentage of the older population in the United States is increasing, and will continue to grow, due to the aging of the Baby Boomers. These individuals will experience a number of transitions and issues that may be associated with the aging process. Examples of these issues are late onset hearing loss, increased possibility for disabling conditions, decrease in ability to live independently, and decreased likelihood of employment potential due to prejudice toward older adults.

The first of the four class sessions will involve...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mary Voyatzis, George Davis

The growth and development of many well-known ancient Greek sites can be more fully understood and appreciated in the context of their geological settings and plate-tectonic dynamics (especially earthquakes, faulting, tsunami, and volcanism). Sites such as Delphi, Mycenae, Ithaka (Cephalonia), Akrotiri (Thera), Helike, Thermopolyae, and Ancient Corinth are some of the examples where there is the opportunity to explore the fusion between human history and geological history. In the spirit of University of Arizona’s emphasis on...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. October 25, November 1, 8, 15, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Homer Pettey

Clearly, Nobel laureates have made major creative contributions to world literature and to international reception of emerging nations’ literary arts.   This course will expose students to movements in 20th-century world literature by reading Nobel laureates. Global modernism, as shown by influences shared among these laureates, combines Western and non-Western styles, traditions, and modes of expression.  This class will emphasize the relationship of modern world literature to traditional arts, performance, and ritual.

Formal...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Byrne

Because insects account for more than half of all described species and have profound effects on our history and culture, knowledge of their contributions and influences is important. Ecologically, insects provide tremendous benefits and equally daunting challenges. They provide critical biological services in pollination, natural products, pest-population regulation, and human nutrition. Insects are also our chief competitors for food, and act as parasites and vectors of human disease, the source of much human misery. The impacts of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Cynthia White

Rome survives despite nearly 3,000 years of invasions by Sabines, Gauls, Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, Normans, Napoleon, Hitler, and mass tourism.  In this course we will visit Rome, interwoven in texts and art, from antiquity through the twentieth century. We will complement our reading selections from diaries, guidebooks, poetry, fiction, and history with film clips and discussion.

Beginning with its foundation on the Palatine Hill and continuing through the design of Mussolini’s Fascist Square, we will reflect on “the city that...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) or "The Good Fight," as was it was commonly called on the left, was democracy's first major confrontation with fascism. Its indelible mark on Spain and on the international community is still felt today.  This course will look at the war, its impact and rich international intellectual legacy. The examination of the war will begin with a consideration of it from the Spanish perspective, uncovering the deep tensions in Spanish society and politics that led up to the armed conflict. From there our analysis...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 until noon October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 11, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

Alexander Hamilton promised that the Constitution would “unite parties for the general welfare,” but Washington perceived that “the baneful effects of the spirit of Party” continued to threaten the republic.  In the centuries since, we have blamed partisans and identified with parties.   Both of our major parties are grab bags of discordant factions, as we will discuss with an eye to how politicians appeal to common aspirations and contradictory assumptions.   As part of our discussions, we will look at the historical evolution of party...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Poss

This seminar will examine mysterious moments, ancient and modern, which have come to the fore in humanity’s quest to understand our place in the cosmos.
 
We begin in prehistory, where from the oldest humans we have evidence of sophisticated astronomy.   How much did the earliest sky-watchers discover the motions of the heavens?  What did they record in stone for us to decipher?  We will study archaeoastronomical monuments in Europe and America to try to place ourselves in the minds of the earliest astronomers.  From there we...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Using the recent translation by Jean and Robert Hollander, we will deal with Dante’s views on human nature as represented in his Purgatorio.  We shall discuss the nature of sin: how it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony); and how it is that human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with Divine assistance).  We will cover the numerous historical personages and references therein, and the theology implicit to it.
Although Purgatorio is the second portion of Dante’s Comedy, it...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

Two years ago the Main Library of the University of Arizona was given a massive donation of original collections from the American Vaudeville Museum by its curators Frank Cullen and Donald McNeilly. This collection is one of the largest in the world. To commemorate this move, Dr. David Soren who coordinated the transfer will offer a course in the history and evolution of American vaudeville from its roots to superstars such as Al Jolson, Sophie Tucker, The Nicholas Brothers, Annette Kellerman, Eddie Cantor and many more.

Dr. Soren...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

The Odyssey gives us an adventure story of a Greek hero returning to his home in Ithaca after the Trojan War.  This could be a straightforward journey lasting three or four days at most.  But in the Odyssey the journey is expanded into a narrative of 24 books (= ancient rolls) and over a time period of ten years.  Home-coming is made into an epic theme.   The epic dimensions of this journey allow the poets to incorporate a variety of folktales of heroic encounters with nymphs of divine beauty and monsters such as only an epic hero could...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Meg Lota Brown

How do Shakespeare and filmmakers who adapt his plays engage their audiences, construct meaning, and enable us to understand more fully our own culture and ourselves? This seminar will deepen our understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s drama and of his cinematic interpreters.  We will focus on the following plays from three different genres—comedy, tragedy, and history: Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part I, Henry IV, Part II, and Henry V. Each of those plays will be paired with at least two film adaptations from...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Barbara Atwood

When Oliver Wendell Holmes declared that “the life of the law has not been logic; it has been experience,” he meant that law is a messy and imperfect invention reflecting the human condition.  This course will explore the imperfect nature of law today by focusing on cutting edge contemporary problems in legal interpretation and policy, with each covered by a distinguished faculty member from the College of Law, who is a well-known expert in the field.  Four distinguished faculty members from the College of Law will lecture on an area within...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

Franz Liszt (1811–1886) is one of the seminal figures of the 19th century. As one of the great piano virtuosos, he toured Europe from one end to the other, coming into contact with virtually all the prominent figures of the period. As a composer, he contributed to all the major genres and pioneered various innovations in form and harmony.
 
A series of four class sessions will consider Liszt, both in terms of biography and music. For the latter, our survey will begin with piano music (the first session), continue with...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 30, February 6, 13, 20, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Adele Barker

This course is for those who love to read ! Beginning with his memoir Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth and then moving into War and Peace, we will discuss the world that the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy created in his fictions against the backdrop of the social and political ferment that would ultimately lead to the 1917 revolution. Tolstoy attempted to find the family happiness in his novels that eluded him in his own life. Reading him is to gain insight into the unique role that literature played in political and...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. January 26, February 2, 9, 16, 23, March 1, 8, 22, 29, April 5, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

I have put in [Ulysses] so many enigmas and  puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant.  James Joyce
                                                                                                                           
While most of the great avant-garde art works of the early 20thcentury rest securely within the canon of modernist classics, Ulysses (1922) continues to challenge and, as the author had hoped, puzzle us. We are still struggling to become Joyce’s...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Patrick Baliani

What makes comedy comedy? Does the comedic aesthetic evolve across cultural and temporal barriers? How do interpretation and performance affect our understanding of the works? What does it mean that "comedy is deadly serious"? These are a few of the questions to be raised in the exploration of one major comedy each week, by Aristophanes, Plautus, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Wilde, Shaw, Coward, and Frayn. Historical, social,
political, and psychological contexts will also be addressed. Professional actors will perform key...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

Gene Kelly once said that “the history of dance on film begins with Astaire.” One might say that the history of dance on film ends with Kelly. Dancin’ Fools will explore the Broadway and Hollywood careers of these two iconic song and dance men who define the Golden Age of movie musicals. Astaire’s elegance and Kelly’s athleticism transformed dance in popular culture and elevated it to the status of art. Astaire in his top hat and tails and Kelly in his white socks and loafers were a counter point to each other, enchanting audiences...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS morning section: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. afternoon section: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Paul Ivey

This course examines the fundamental issues and theories surrounding the art production and reception of Modern Art in Europe and America through the twentieth century. Framed by discussions of Post-Impressionist painting of the 1880s and the Post-Modern pluralist art of the 1980s, we will examine how theories of human nature, art, and spirituality informed the creation and interpretation of painting, sculpture, architecture and mixed-media works in their specific cultural, social and political arenas. This class will trace two major...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

After 2500 years, Ancient Greek Drama still fascinates modern audiences. In this course students will explore the interactions between the ancient and modern. By reading ancient Greek plays or poems and reading or viewing a modern play or film based on the ancient, students will discuss the themes and ideas prevalent in the ancient, how these are treated in the modern versions, and why these ancient themes still appeal to dramatists, cinematographers and their audiences. The modern versions are selected for the thought-provoking...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jonathan Overpeck

This course will give students an understanding of how the Earth’s climate changes naturally, as well as how humans are driving this change. We will explore what is likely to happen in the future, resulting both from natural change and change driven by the human-caused rise of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and other influences. We’ll cover the physical climate system, how it interacts with water, landscapes and ecosystems, and what the options are for dealing with the change, both in terms of adaptation and reducing...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jerry Hogle

"Gothic" literature, theater, and (more recently) films have been a part of Western culture for over 250 years and have presented us, in disguise, with heightened -- and sometimes lurid and monstrous -- symbols of what really haunts us as a culture in our individual, social, and cultural sub-conscious.

This course will look at how the Gothic began as a literary form in the 1760's, how and why it has changed as a mode of fiction over time, and the ways in which it draws out repressed levels of belief and feeling in our culture. By the...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October, 6, 13, 20, 27, November 3, 10, 17, December 1, 8, 15, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Scott Lucas

This course explores the beliefs and cultures of Islam and the Muslim world. It covers the life and teachings of Muhammad, major themes of the Qur’an, and the primary differences between Sunni and Shi’i Muslims. It also introduces aspects of Muslim cultures in the Middle East and South Asia in order to demonstrate the plurality of traditions within the religion of Islam. It concludes with a review of American foreign policy in the Muslim world over the past half century and its impact on Muslim-American relations.

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mike Lippman

This course tracks the downward spiral of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, starting from around 146 BC when Rome first firmly established herself as the world power and continuing through the Battle of Actium of 31 BC, where Octavian established his sole reign as ruler of the Mediterranean.

The main focus will be on primary ancient texts. We will read contemporary authors like Cicero (his orations and his personal letters), the historian Sallust and the campaign accounts of Julius Caesar. We will also read the...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: John Wilson

 With an eye to the esthetic qualities of the human body in motion, this course surveys diverse forms of dance in many cultures of the world in order to deepen our appreciation of the spiritual, emotional, and intellectual dimensions of this universal mode of expression. We begin with studying how and why the human body is uniquely designed for dancing. We continue with the study of rhythm as a psycho-kinesthetic phenomenon and observe how dance, song, and poetry arise in the same experience. We then trace the evolution of dance forms from...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

Travels in Consciousness, taught by Norman Austin, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Classics,  will explore the history of consciousness as reflected in a variety of texts. Readings will range widely, from Bronze Age Greece to American authors of the Twentieth Century.  By “consciousness” is meant the ways in which individuals conceive of themselves and their world; it has to do not only with thought but also with feeling, volition, and behavior. So regarded consciousness constitutes individual identity and defines the human...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on: September 30, October 7, 14, 21, 28, November 4, 18, December 2, 9, 16, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room