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Spring 2021
Anna Dornhaus
Mondays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Jan 25 to Apr 12

The brain of an ant is smaller than a pinhead, yet social insect colonies implement effective organization and flexible problem solving at large scales. But their organization is alien to us: no hierarchy or central control(er) guides individual actions. Similar self-organized structures abound in biology, whether in nerve cells forming brains, cellular machinery, or ecosystems. Research on such complex adaptive systems has generated both philosophical questions (does organization emerge “for free”?) and engineering applications (managing an efficient self-organized internet). In this...

Spring 2021
Rebecca Senf
Tuesdays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Jan 26 to Apr 6

One of the most influential photographers of his generation, Ansel Adams is famous for his dramatic photographs of the American West. This course focuses on his early career and largely unknown early work. It will demonstrate how these early photographs are crucial to understanding his artistic development and offer new insights into many aspects of the artist’s mature body of work. Beginning with an album from his childhood and ending with his Guggenheim-supported National Parks photography of the 1940s, the course highlights the artist’s persistence in forging a career path and his...

Spring 2021
Caleb Simmons
Wednesdays
1 PM - 4 PM (AZ Time)
Jan 27 to Apr 7

Images of Hinduism and Hindu deities have been integrated into our collective imagination as part of American popular culture. From the cover of Jimi Hendrix’s Axis: Bold as Love, photos of the Beatles seated alongside Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the goddess on the cover of the first issue of Gloria Steinem’s Ms. magazine, or even Ganesha on the counter of Kwik-e Mart on The Simpsons, most Americans have a vague idea about the appearance of Hindu gods and goddesses. In this course we will push beyond the layer of popular allusions to Hindu deities to take a deeper...

Spring 2021
Peter Medine
Wednesdays
9 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Jan 27 to Apr 7

A lyric poem is a relatively short statement in verse, usually in the first person, and deals with emotionally charged subject matter, such as unrequited love, personal loss, celebration, or even philosophical meditation. This seminar will address itself to lyric poems in English from Shakespeare to Yeats, among others. Each seminar meeting will analyze a half dozen lyrics and examine such rhetorical devices as metaphor, rhyme, and meter in an attempt to uncover the poem's unique principle of order. The order expresses literal meaning but is also figurative and musical. The aim ultimately...

Spring 2021
Christie Kerr
Thursdays
1 PM - 3 PM (AZ Time)
Jan 28 to Apr 8

Since it first appeared in the dance world, tap dancing immediately enchanted the public in North America, becoming a vital part of jazz music culture and broader mainstream musical culture. Its staccato and style are homegrown. Come explore the history and significance of the American art form of tap dance. Tap has evolved through the years thanks to many significant tap dancers and choreographers. Each week we will discuss different tappers and their contributions to the dance world. Examples and video footage of these dancers will be shown and discussed. Readings will enhance learning...

Spring 2021
Jay Rosenblatt
Mondays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Feb 1 to Feb 22

This past year we celebrated the 250th anniversary of the birth of Ludwig van Beethoven. He was one of the great masters of the Classical and Romantic eras in music, and aside from the symphony, no genre summarizes his achievement better than the string quartet. These sixteen works are spread evenly throughout his early, middle, and late styles. In our four class sessions we will devote the first to an overview of Beethoven’s life and career, with the following three each covering one of his stylistic periods. It is not necessary to read music for this class, and excerpts from Beethoven’s...

Spring 2021
E. Charles Adams
Tuesdays
10 AM - 12 PM
Feb 2 to Mar 2

This course was originally scheduled for Spring 2020 but was postponed due to COVID-19

Many of us are familiar with and may have even visited the seemingly mystical places in the Four Corners of the U.S. Southwest on the Colorado Plateau, including Mesa Verde, Chaco Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, and many more. These were the long-ago homes of people we know as Pueblo, who began farming in the region 4,000 years ago. Their descendants – the Hopi, Zuni, Acoma, and Rio Grande Pueblos – retain strong spiritual connections to these places told in oral histories passed...

Spring 2021
Norman Austin
Fridays
10 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Feb 5 to Mar 5

In 399 BCE Socrates was tried in Athens, the first trial in Western history to indict, convict, and condemn to death someone for impiety. In Plato’s Apology Socrates says that the indictment was based on two charges: first, that he was worshipping new gods (daimonia in Greek), and second, that he was corrupting the young. As Socrates defends himself, he explains that he has a daimonion that seems to be something like his personal god, a being that would not instruct him to follow any particular course of action but would intervene to inform Socrates when Socrates...

Spring 2021
Mary Voyatzis, David Gilman Romano
Mondays
10 AM - 12 PM
Mar 15 to Apr 5

This course was originally scheduled for Spring 2020 but was postponed due to COVID-19

Since 2004 the University of Arizona has been excavating at the sanctuary of Zeus on Mt. Lykaion, known as the “Birthplace of Zeus.” High in the Arcadian mountains of Greece, it has yielded remarkable discoveries over the last 15 years. Human activity at its ash altar began in the Neolithic period (4th millennium B.C.) and continued into the Hellenistic period (about 200 B.C.). An important Mycenaean shrine also sat at the southern peak of the mountain around 1500 B.C., as well...

Spring 2021
Alain-Philippe Durand, Carine Bourget, Barbara Kosta, Bryan Carter, Denis Provencher
Tuesdays
9 AM - 12 PM (AZ Time)
Mar 16 to Apr 20

In this seminar several professors from the College of Humanities address different topics that connect France with other nations.

Alain-Philippe Durand will first look at American and Brazilian French literature—how American and Latin American studies developed in France (Bastide, Camus, de Beauvoir, Lévi-Strauss, and others). Next, Carine Bourget will lecture on Islam and immigration in France through Yamina Benguigui’s documentaries on French immigration policies and assimilation. Then Barbara Kosta will present Berlin-Paris, exploring the significance of France, especially Paris...

Spring 2021
Jessica E. Tierney, Joellen L. Russell, Christopher L. Castro
Thursdays
6 PM - 8 PM
Mar 18 to Apr 22

This course was originally scheduled for Spring 2020 but was postponed due to COVID-19

Have you ever watched in wonder at our gorgeous earth, sea, and sky interacting to provide us with the air we breathe, water we drink, and food we eat? Come hear UA professors of geosciences, hydrology, and atmospheric sciences discuss how our climate and weather systems evolved and are changing--and how that will affect our relationship with the earth, sea, and sky and with each other. This course will cover the evolution of earth systems that produced the climate of today (...

Spring 2021
Laura Hollengreen
Fridays
10 AM - 12 PM
Mar 19 to Apr 9

Saints and cult sites were central to religious practice in the Christian Middle Ages. This course examines four sites (Qalʿat Simʿān, Constantinople, Conques, and Chartres) to find evolving concepts of sanctity and forms of cultic practice in medieval sociopolitical context. When did new kinds of saints emerge? How did holy people interact with others in their societies? How does architecture spatialize perception of the sacred, and how does art focus it? Ranging from fifth-century Syria to thirteenth-century France, the buildings to be discussed include monastic and pilgrimage churches,...