Upcoming Courses

To see all courses currently available scroll to the bottom of this page.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 10 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 28 - April 8, 2019. No class on March 4.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

To study film language is to explore how films use narrative structure, visual style and sound design. We will begin at the beginnings of film, from the 1890s through the 1910s feature, the European art film movements of the 1920s and the arrival of sound. With this grounding in camerawork, editing, sound, action, and motifs, we will turn to examine the theory and practice of stylistic devices that developed in the second half century of film history -- neo-realism, distanciation, and feminist film. Throughout the course we will screen films* that use film language in deliberate ways to engage the audience in reflection on humanity, social justice, and history. Filmmakers include Cheryl Dunye, R.W. Fassbinder, Warwick Thornton, Rene Clair, D.W. Griffith, Akira Kurosawa, Hiroshi Shimizu, Chris Marker, Pablo Larrain, and David Miller.

*All films are available through Kanopy.com, a free online streaming service.  To access this service, students need a Pima County Public Library card.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 28 - February 25, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

In this course, we will focus on learning to read three of Faulkner’s most celebrated novels: The Sound and the Fury (1929), Light in August (1932), and Absalom, Absalom! (1936). “Learning to read,” means learning to analyze, interpret, and enjoy. We will ask ourselves such questions as:  What do these texts contribute to our understanding of American Literature? What contributions have they made to the novel as a genre? How are we to tease out the meaning and deployment of time, history, race, and the south in these prodigious texts? We will engage the novels as close readers, pondering carefully and in depth the words on the page as well as the plot lines, characters, and cultural concerns expressed therein. First time readers and devout Faulkner fans are equally welcome!

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. March 11 - April 8, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

“No person ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he/she is not the same person.” If this is the human condition according to Heraclitus, what remains permanent in the midst of change? This course will explore the twin themes of permanence and change as they are expressed in William Wordsworth’s Intimations Ode and four American novels: F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises, Nella Larsen’s Passing, and Philip Roth’s The Human Stain. We will consider the specific cultural context and key concerns of each text. Themes to be explored include childhood in the early 19th century for Wordsworth; the United States in the 1920s for Fitzgerald; the post WWI world that shapes Hemingway’s characters in Europe; the ambiguous nature of race and gender in the American scene for Larsen; and the American angst at the end of the Twentieth Century for Roth.

Required Reading:

Fitzgerald, Scott F. The Great Gatsby. Scribner, 1995. ISBN-10: 0684801523. ISBN-13: 978-0684801520.

Hemingway, Ernest. The Sun Also Rises. Scribner, 1995. ISBN-10: 0684800713. ISBN-13: 978-0684800714.

Larsen, Nella. Passing. Penguin Classics, 1997. ISBN-10: 0141180250. ISBN-13: 978-0141180250.

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006. ISBN-10: 0060838671. ISBN-13: 978-0060838676.

Roth, Philip. The Human Stain. Vintage International, 2001. ISBN-10: 0375726349. ISBN-13: 978-0375726347.

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 15 - February 12, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

Most of the people in the world know something about the American West. Usually popular ideas about it come from the work of novelists, artists, performers, filmmakers and TV producers, who created a mythical time and place where self-reliant pioneers overcame physical hardship, dangerous Indians, and environmental challenges to populate the region. Reality suggests a different picture. Hundreds of thousands of homesteaders failed, the vast majority of would-be miners never struck it rich, and most pioneers never met hostile Indians. Yet, at the same time reality really did follow the script. For some people the West offered mineral wealth, a family farm or rich grazing land, personal adventure, or a chance to escape tiresome routines and start life over in a new place. This seminar will discuss both the realities and the myths most of us have about settling the American West.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2019. No class on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course will explore the culture, counterculture, and art of the long decade of the 1960s. Our focus will center on youthful artists in the United States, beginning with Abstract Expressionism and ending with Performance art and what critic Lucy Lippard called the “dematerialization of the art object.” Social history, semiotic analysis, literary and film theory, and art history will inform class discussions. Themes include the Cold War and Beat culture, the rise of Minimalism and Pop Art, psychedelic experience, the prominence of advertising and the marketing of “cool,” student movements, censorship, Rock music culture, the Vietnam War, and hippie communal spirituality. 

Professor
Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24 - April 4, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This seminar examines Virgil’s Aeneid as well as the pivotal and turbulent context that led to its creation. The course begins with an introduction to the political turmoil that encompassed the fall of the Roman Republic and Octavian’s rise to power as Augustus Caesar, supreme ruler of the Roman Empire. It will then turn to explore the influence of Greece on the development of Roman culture and on Virgil’s development as a poet. Virgil’s objective in the Aeneid was to provide a mythic narrative to explain the Roman people as a continuation in Italy of the Trojans celebrated by Homer. The Aeneid was the culmination of Virgil’s literary career and this seminar will emphasize Virgil’s poetic invention of the idea of Rome, and the lasting influence of that idea in both Europe and the United States.

Professor
Tuition:
$ 235
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 18 - April 5, 2019.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the central conflict of the twentieth century. Our approach to the topic will be roughly chronological and will attempt to treat each of the major theaters and battles, themes, and ideas of the conflict. We will trace its origins in the aftermath of WWI, see the growth of fascism, the expansion of the Japanese Empire, and the rise of Hitler. In an effort to cover all the theaters of the war, both in Europe and in the Pacific, we will first examine the campaigns and battles in a conventional “military history” sense. In addition to this, we will consider the accelerated pace of technological advances, from sonar and radar to the proximity fuse and the atom bomb. Finally, we will follow innovations in media techniques used in the propaganda war on all sides and the creation of national mythologies through film and television.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE SPRING BROCHURE HAS THE TIME LISTED INCORRECTLY. The class meets for three hours from 9 to noon.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 24 - February 21, 2019.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Future Course

Please note that this course meets in Oro Valley!

Water is the most important resource associated with ecological and human well-being, economic productivity, and security. Stresses are placed on the Earth’s water resources by climate change, population growth, conflicts, and other social changes. Achieving a sustainable use of water may be the most critical issue of natural resource management now facing many societies. This course addresses the science and technology underlying sustainable water use. We will discuss water use within energy generation, domestic supplies, and agriculture while highlighting water use and modification along entire production and supply chains. Water use within agriculture, for example, accounts for more than 70% of the world’s freshwater use. We will also examine multi-disciplinary case studies that highlight specific challenges, successes, and failures in water use and management around the world today.

Tuition:
$130
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. February 28 - March 28, 2019. Please note that this course will meet during the UA spring break on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course will examine the sites that were most critical to the development of ancient Egyptian civilization and have yielded its most spectacular discoveries. Archaeological sites such as the Pyramids and Great Sphinx of Giza, the Valley of the Kings & King Tutankamun's tomb, and the treasures of Tanis will be explored and their significance in Egyptian history explained. The course will focus on the archaeological evidence for each site or clustered group of discoveries with an emphasis on the time between the Predynastic Period (ca 4500 BC) and the New Kingdom (ca 1000 BC).

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. January 17 - February 7, 2019.
Holsclaw Hall, Fred Fox School of Music
Future Course

Please note that this course meets in Holsclaw Hall in the Fred Fox School of Music.

Why is it that much classical music written after 1910 remains difficult for audiences? The answer lies partially in the splintering of compositional languages throughout the 20th century, languages that can leave listeners unnecessarily flummoxed and dissatisfied. In this class, Dr. Milbauer will lead—from the piano bench—a sweeping tour of compositional movements from the turn of the 20th century to the present, finding windows into understanding by linking newer composers with their better-known antecedents and by referencing visual arts, physics, literature, philosophy, dance, and history. After four weeks, students will be better equipped to derive meaning and beauty from this extraordinary repertoire, and will have a greater understanding of the principal “isms” of the last century: Impressionism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Serialism, Neo-Classicism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Minimalism, Aleatoricism, and Post-Modernism. This course assumes no prior study of music.

Professor
Tuition:
$235
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2019. No class on March 6.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

The Balkans has typically been described stereotypically and which countries belong in the Balkans today remains contentious. In this course, we will examine the Balkans from a variety of perspectives: the cultural-historical background of the Balkans as a geopolitical construct, as well as the ethnic, national, and religious identities as interpreted by the people themselves, governing entities, and outside observers. Documentary and narrative films by Balkan filmmakers will enhance our exploration of the various social, historical, and cultural factors that influence a group's conception of themselves and others. Literature, music, cuisine, and language will also be examined as means of constructing and expressing identity in this highly diverse multi-cultural and multi-lingual region.

Required films will be accessible on YouTube and Kanopy, a free video streaming service available through the Pima County Public Library. 

Tuition:
$185
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 22 - April 2, 2019. No class on March 5.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course will focus on Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron, a collection of putatively “true” stories inspired by Boccaccio’s Decameron. Composed in the 1540s, the entertaining Heptaméron is puzzling on several counts. That the Queen of Navarre, sister of King Francis I and a woman known for her piety, would pen such racy tales—about adultery, trickery, clergy abuse, and murder—is surprising in and of itself. We will explore this conundrum throughout the course. In particular, we will examine realistic elements within the stories, which offer glimpses of everyday Renaissance life; the moral complexities and shifting perspectives that make the Heptaméron’s “meaning” elusive; the marginalized viewpoints of women and servants, which Marguerite uses as vehicles of revelation that contest the status quo; and the religious and sociopolitical implications of the narratives within the context of Reformation-era France.