Fall

Immigration and the U.S. - Mexico Border

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Celestino Fernandez School of Sociology

Since the formation of the current U.S.-Mexico border resulting from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, immigration (both legal and unauthorized) across this border has been a hotly debated political issue. That debate continues today as seen in the rhetoric of last year’s presidential election and the various issues pertaining to the border, including “The Wall,” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and immigration. This seminar will explore various immigration issues across the U.S.-Mexico border through historical, humanistic, and sociological lenses. It focuses on the human drama that has played out, and continues to do so today, as people from Latin America attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, the most frequently crossed in the world. Some of the questions addressed include: What is the border? Who crosses it? Why do they cross? Can the issue of immigration be resolved?

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

The Harlem Renaissance

Professor: 

Associate Professor Bryan Carter Africana Studies Program

In the 1920s and 1930s the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. From just after World War I until just after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music, and literature was celebrated in cities such as Harlem, Chicago, Washington, New York, and even as far away as Paris. In this course we will explore the Harlem Renaissance, which is considered the first important movement of black artists and writers in the United States. 

 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 11 - November 8, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Masterpieces of French Realist Fiction

Professor: 

Professor Marie-Pierre Le Hir Department of French and Italian

This seminar examines the relations between culture and power in nineteenth-century France through the study of masterpieces of realist fiction. The realist novel is a cultural artefact specific to the nineteenth century, a genre born with the modern democratic nation-state at a time when (relative) freedom of expression allowed for the emergence of a public sphere. The four novels studied in this course also have in common that they are romans d’éducation (or Bildungsroman) thematically focused on young men’s struggles to succeed in a democratized society, i.e., to reap the revolutionary promise of freedom, fraternity, and equality. By giving voice and shape to the sociopolitical aspirations of the French people, the novel responded to the needs of an increasingly large reading public that faced the same dilemmas and recognized itself in it.

 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 3 - December 15, 2017. No class on November 21.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Dante's Inferno

Professor: 

Professor; Department of French and Italian Fabian Alfie Department of French and Italian

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine ComedyInferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization of his hell, from lesser to greater sins, the numerous historical personages and references in it, and its implicit theology. We will also look at Dante’s narrative, discussing how the actions of his characters and their respective punishments depict the true nature of the sins.

The purpose of Dante’s voyage is not about merely observing the torments of the damned, but rather about gaining knowledge of the true nature of evil. While many contemporary readers might disagree with the categories of Dante’s sins, the question of evil is as relevant today as it was in the fourteenth century.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 12 - November 2, 2017.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Has the United States Become an Empire?

Professor: 

Professor David Gibbs Department of History

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on Terror. The course lectures will emphasize the remarkable continuity of U.S. policy from the Cold War through the period after it.

This course is a repeat of the class given in Spring 2016.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. September 15 - December 15, 2017. No classes on October 6, October 20, November 10, and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Islam in the 21st Century: Resources and Challenges

Professor: 

Associate Professor Scott Lucas School of Middle Eastern and North African Studies, Religious Studies Program

This course explores Islam and Muslim societies in the contemporary period. It begins by focusing on the fundamentals of Islam, such as the life of Muhammad, the Qur’an, law, and theology. The topics we will discuss include opportunities for Muslims in the United States, Islamic spirituality (including Sufism), and successful Muslim-majority countries, such as Indonesia. The primary challenges we will address include political authoritarianism, sectarianism, and religious extremism. The objective of this seminar is to provide accurate information about the religion of Islam and to demystify Muslim cultures that frequently are portrayed in the media as violent and irrationally hostile to the West. Seminarians are encouraged to bring their questions regarding Islam and Muslims to this class.

 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m September 28 - December 7, 2017. No class on November 23.
Location TBD

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Evolutionary Psychology

Professor: 

Associate Professor Anna Dornhaus Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Biology has well-supported insights into how animals make decisions and why they behave the way they do, in contexts from foraging to cooperation. This knowledge is grounded in theory as well as empirical evidence. Generally these insights also apply to humans: humans evolved, and thus their brain as well as their preferences, capabilities, and learning abilities are all the result of natural selection, as they are for any other animal. What consequences does this have for our understanding of how people behave when shopping, budgeting time, parenting, loving, or hating? In this course, we will cover how biologists arrived at their conclusions about animals and discuss how they apply to humans. We will also talk about psychological research and controversies in this area, and what, if anything, differentiates humans from other animals (intelligence, cultural evolution, free will?). Do any of these research findings change our conclusions? 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2017. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

The Romantic Poets: Revolution and Retrospection

Professor: 

Professor Jerry Hogle Department of English

This seminar focuses on the six poets (one recently rediscovered) who most defined  English Romanticism in poetry and verse drama between 1798 and 1824. It emphasizes their philosophical, emotional, and stylistic tugs-of-war, despite their quite different politics: first, between proposals for revolutions in social organization and how individuals relate to the wider world (they all knew the American and French revolutions of the 1770s-90s), and second, retrogressive longings for earlier orders of being and poetic styles whose revivals promised a better world than the emerging one of rapid social changes and aggressive industrialism. Each class examines their most progressive and simultaneously regressive tendencies, the special paradoxes that still make these poets so revealing about the post-Enlightenment dawning of the modern world. The six poets are: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Mary Robinson, Byron, Keats, and Shelley.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 4 - December 13, 2017. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Beethoven

Professor: 

Associate Professor Jay Rosenblatt School of Music

This course surveys the music of Ludwig van Beethoven from the perspectives of different professors at the Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt begins with an overview of Beethoven’s life: his youth in Bonn, the reasons for his move to Vienna, and the outline of his early, middle, and late style periods. He will also introduce the stylistic characteristics of Beethoven’s music. Subsequent sessions will be led by Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, who will consider Beethoven’s sacred music, particularly the Missa Solemnis; Thomas Cockrell, Director of Orchestral Activities, who will discuss Beethoven’s symphonies; John Milbauer, Professor of Piano, who will focus on Beethoven’s late piano work; and Tim Kantor, Assistant Professor of Violin, who will examine Beethoven’s chamber music from the perspective of a professional string quartet member.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

0

Course Time and Dates: 

MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 16 - November 13, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

How We Feel About Politics, Section II

Professor: 

Professor; Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs Thomas P. Miller Department of English

This course steps back from polls and punditry to reflect on broader historical developments. It considers women in politics, divisions between rich and poor, and ethnic minorities becoming the new majority. To deepen our analyses, we will consider writings on politics and ethics, including some that shaped the founding of the republic as well as recent research on political cognition and moral imagination. That research has brought us back to Hume’s view that “reason is a slave of the passions,” something abundantly apparent in the current campaign. Stepping back from the attack ads, we will reflect on the rhetorical dynamics of American politics, including ongoing shifts in the principal parties, the role of debates as tests of character, the evolution of media and advertising, and other factors that shape how we feel about politics.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

FRIDAYS 10:30 AM to 12:30 PM September 30 - December 16, 2016. No class on November 11 and November 25.
Dorothy Rubel Room

Course Trimester: 

Course Year: 

Course Graphic: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Fall