Summer

Three by Austen: Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Peter Medine Department of English

ATTEND THE INAUGURAL COURSE IN ORO VALLEY

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed.  Such approaches will bring into focus the education of the main characters through the trials of their experiences. While the novels conform to the comedic mode, in which the principals ultimately realize their destinies as well-married men and women, their education displays the hazards, if not the flaws, of society and humanity. These are some of the ways in which Austen reworks the Bildungsroman formula to create narratives of poise, wit, and artistic seriousness. It is little wonder that Austen has long been regarded as the originator of the “great tradition” of the English novel.

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FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 pm August 4 - September 1, 2017
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr

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Great Romantic Composer-Pianists of the 19th Century

Professor: 

Professor Tannis Gibson Fred Fox School of Music

What inspired Romantic composers of the 19th century to create the significant piano works that continue to speak profoundly to today’s audiences? Throughout the Romantic era the piano and the pianist-composers who wrote for it assumed an increasingly important role in European society. These pianist-composers and virtuosi fully explored the inner depths of their imaginations, and it is perhaps in the solo piano repertoire most of all that we as listeners become privy to their most passionate and idiosyncratic work. In this course we focus on the piano works of Felix Mendelssohn, Frederic Chopin, Robert and Clara Schumann, Franz Liszt, and Johannes Brahms – pianist-composers who embodied the Romantic spirit and pursued freedom from the constraints of their predecessors. We will read composers’ letters and first-hand accounts and current research, and of course, listen to performances.

Professor Gibson will be using CDs and an electronic piano to illustrate her lectures.

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THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 1 - June 29, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Deserts, Plants, and People

Professor: 

Associate Professor Steve Smith Schools of Renewable Natural Resources and the Environment, and Plant Sciences

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants from different deserts. Here the key questions will be: How do these plants grow and develop in these environments? Deserts are also associated with significant events in human history and many issues in contemporary international relations. Throughout the course we will consider humans and their influences on desert environments. We will also explore challenging questions here such as how societies perceive and steward deserts, and how are these actions connected?

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TUESDAYS 9:00 am - 12:00 pm June 6 - June 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Histories of Memories

Professor: 

Associate Professor Susan A. Crane Department of History

This course examines modern histories of collective memories through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography, and visual culture. We will consider moments of tension when history and memory appear to be at odds, when competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict, or when silences about the past are broken. Case studies may include: the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian in 1995; appeals for apologies for past atrocities, such as slavery, human trafficking, or genocide; or lynching photographs in the “Without Sanctuary” exhibit of 2002. While the course emphasizes how societies come to terms with painful or shameful memories, we will also focus on the ways in which visual sources, particularly photographs, have shaped discourses of memory. By learning from scratch how to “read” historical photographs, we will interrogate the ways in which iconic images, snapshots, and “Kodak moments” have become integral to thinking about collective memory.

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TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm August 1 - August 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Forgotten Stars of Vaudeville

Professor: 

Regents Professor David Soren School of Anthropology, Department of Classics

The University of Arizona has one of America's greatest holdings in the field of vaudeville. Special Collections Guest Curator David Soren presents some of the best stars and specialty acts you've never heard of along with fascinating and little-known information about some of the biggest stars. Featured are vaudeville's most versatile performer Joe Cook, whose sidekick, pantomime comic Dave Chasen, founded Chasen's Restaurant (open 1936-1995) in West Hollywood. Learn about the dark side of Al Jolson, and witness one of his performances that was banned for many years on American television. See a portrait of Annette Kellerman, the Australian swimming superstar who pioneered the one-piece bathing suit and promptly got arrested! And much more.

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THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 11:00 am July 6 - July 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Virgil and the European Pastoral Tradition: The Invention of Arcadia

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Norman Austin Department of Religious Studies and Classics

Virgil, the greatest Roman poet, did more to establish the idea of Rome (and hence of the Roman Empire) than any other ancient poet. As a young man he began his poetic career writing pastoral poems, which are called Eclogues. This seminar will study the political pressures in the final days of the Roman Republic that led Virgil to invent a new genre of poetry. He borrowed the idea of the pastoral from the Hellenistic Greek poets, but made a new genre of poetry uniquely his own. Concentrating on a selection from Virgil’s Eclogues, this seminar will trace both the influence of the Greek tradition and Virgil’s own influence in creating a style and a genre of pastoral poetry that was to have immense significance in subsequent European poetry.

 

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Course Time and Dates: 

FRIDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 30 - July 28, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Freedom to Be: Some Restrictions Apply

Professor: 

Research Professor of Law Melissa Tatum James E. Rogers College of Law

The United States was founded on broad principles of individual freedom – declarations of the right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” were central to the American Revolution and the subsequent foundations of the new country. Looking back, we know that those rights were meant at the time for white land-owning men, and it was only after two centuries of discrimination that formal actions were taken to eliminate institutional racism and gender discrimination from U.S. law.

This dismantling of institutional racism did not, however, encompass all Americans. Today, American Indians and Alaska Natives are under tremendous regulation and government oversight, regulations that do not apply to other groups within the United States. Each week of the class will focus on a different aspect of these regulations, with a particular focus on family and children, religion and culture, and control over various forms of property.

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THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 4 - May 25, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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The Brontes and Their World

Professor: 

Associate Professor, Associate Dean Laura C. Berry Department of English, UA Honors College

The Bronte family – their extraordinary literary output, as well as their fascinating lives – have become something like a cottage industry, inspiring imitators, adaptations, a tourist attraction, tea towels, dance, music, and even the names of three asteroids. What accounts for this popularity? Is it the novels themselves? Or is it what is sometimes seen as the sensational aspects of their lives? In this course we will look at the novels, reading them as classic works of literature, understanding them as separate artifacts, but also examining their interrelations. At the same time, we will consider our continuing fascination with the Bronte family. We will also read Jean Rhys’s retelling of Jane Eyre’s story through the eyes of the madwoman in the attic. And we will examine the historical conditions of the time and the geographic and sociopolitical differences between Yorkshire, where the sisters mostly lived, and London, seen as the center of literary life.

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WEDNESDAYS 9:00 am to 12:00 pm May 3 - May 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Making Sense of Soviet History

Professor: 

Professor Doug Weiner Department of History

The Bolshevik Revolution and the Soviet Union played defining roles in the twentieth century, yet are poorly understood. To help us to better grasp their history, this course will integrate the best scholarship and currently available evidence to provide a broad picture of Soviet history that makes the most sense today. We will begin with the context of the Bolshevik seizure of power. Among other topics, the course will cover the relationship of Marxism to Soviet ideology and practice, the rise of Stalin, the Soviet economy, ethnic policy, World War II, the Cold War, Khrushchev’s “thaw,” and Gorbachev and the ultimate fall of the Soviet system. The goal is to give students a new sense of how Soviet history fits into a broader Russian (and human) history.

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1

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 3 - August 24, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room

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The Ideal Political State: More's Utopia and Swift's Gulliver's Travels

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Peter Medine Department of English

This seminar will focus on the ideal political state as it is represented in More's Utopia (1516) and Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726). There are no incontrovertibly valid answers to the question of what constitutes the ideal state and how it may be realized, and neither Utopia nor Gulliver Travels pretends to advance them. The works are fictional, and the methods are literary—a Platonic dialogue and a prose satire. Each work advances two arguments, one that affirms the ideal political state and the other that rejects its possibility. Neither author endorses one argument over the other. The result is ironic detachment and openness rather than closure. Such openness and irony may not admit of concrete proposals for reform, but they do provide for a searching inquiry into the ideal political state and the capacity of humans achieve it.

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1

Course Time and Dates: 

TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. August 2 - August 30, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room

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