Spring

Architecture: The Idea of Materials, the Material of Ideas

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Alvaro Malo School of Architecture

This seminar aims to elicit students’ participation in a free-spirited conversation and regain a sense of wonder and intimacy with architecture.  The discussion topics will be based on five readings, which are accessible, practical, and poetic. They will offer a generous survey of philosophical and architectural thinking from classical to modern, examining the motives and reasons for the making of architecture and the concurrent material consciousness.

The five sessions address Mortimer Adler’s Aristotle for Everybody, which examines man the maker; Paul Valéry’s essay “Eupalinos, or The Architect”; Richard Sennett’s The Craftsman, pointing toward material consciousness; Peter Zumthor’s Thinking Architecture; and Louis I. Kahn’s Light Is the Theme, which focuses on the design and building of the Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. February 22 - March 29, 2017 (no class on March 15)
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Igor Stravinsky's Four Russian Ballets: Up Close and Personal

Professor: 

Professor Bruce Chamberlain Fred Fox School of Music

This course explores the background and the groundbreaking stylistic features of Stravinsky’s most famous works: Firebird, Petrushka, The Rite of Spring, and Les Noces. Considered the epitome of early 20th-century composition, these works defined musical syntax for generations of composers. Les Noces, the least known of these works, is a ballet cantata, calling for four pianos, 11 percussionists, four singing soloists, mixed choir, and corps de ballet. Rarely performed due to its difficulty and complexity, it will not only be a major focus of our course, but the UA School of Dance and Fred Fox School of Music Choral Department will partner for historic performances of it at Stevie Eller Dance Theatre. Class participants, in addition to gaining a thorough understanding of these works and their socioartistic significance, will be treated to behind-the-scenes access during the rehearsal process and given a complimentary ticket to a performance of Les Noces.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25 - February 15, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Looking Back: The Protestant Reformation after 500 Years

Professor: 

Regents' Professor Susan Karant-Nunn History, The Division for Late Medieval and Reformation Studies

This course surveys the Reformation. Beginning with Europe at the end of the fifteenth century, we discuss why Martin Luther broke with the late-medieval Roman Catholic Church, and explore traditional and novel theologies and ecclesiastical practices. We touch on other actors and movements like the Swiss Reformation (Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin) and the English Anglican/Puritan reforms. In addition, we look at smaller nonconformist ways of thinking like the Anabaptists and their martyrdom at the hands of Protestants and Catholics alike. Finally, we see how Catholicism underwent similar reform in the sixteenth century. Here we examine major Catholic reformers like the Spaniards Ignatius of Loyola and Teresa of Avila, and the Italian Carlo Borromeo, and how the Council of Trent at midcentury set a template for a renewed Catholic Church.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Negative Symbiosis? Germans and Jews after the Holocaust

Professor: 

Professor Thomas Kovach Department of German Studies

This course explores works from the postwar era by Jewish and German authors--both writings and films--from East and West Germany and Austria. In these works we will see differences among the three successor states to the Nazis, including the ways people dealt with guilt for Nazi crimes, but also with feeling victimized by the bombing of German cities and the division of Germany after the war. The Jewish texts stem mainly from the post-Unification era, when many Jewish writers reflected on how their parents felt shame about deciding to remain in or return to the land that had carried out the mass murders of their families and friends, and thus hesitated to claim German identity. But starting in the 1980s, a new generation of Jewish writers in German have sought to define a new kind of Jewish-German identity. Though the complexities of the German-Jewish relationship have hardly vanished, there is reason for hope, based on writings and films of more recent times, that tensions will diminish.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

MONDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23 - April 3, 2017. No class on March 13.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Contemporary Turkey in Context: Culture, Power, and History

Professor: 

Associate Professor Brian Silverstein School of Anthropology

Turkey, one of the world’s most populous Muslim-majority countries, is a member of NATO and has tried to enter the European Union for over ten years. Since 2002 the country has undergone rapid and profound changes under the rule of the Justice and Development Party and its leader Tayyip Erdogan. These changes include a growth-oriented economy, massive infrastructural investment, softening of the country’s secularist ideology, a transformed foreign policy oriented toward economic and political engagement, and in recent years controversial steps often described as “authoritarian” by observers inside and outside the country. But what is “really going on” in Turkey? How might we understand where Turkey is heading? This course explores the contemporary history, culture, economy, and politics of Turkey to help answer those questions through lectures by Professor Silverstein and other UA experts on Turkey.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 27 to April 7, 2017. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Film and Narrative Space

Professor: 

Professor Emerita Mary Beth Haralovich School of Theatre, Film & Television

Set decorators call it the art of silent storytelling--how art direction and production design (everything on screen) establish and convey character and story. We examine this “narrative space” through three topics. “Life Stories” that range from personal to epic: class relations in WWI prisoner of war camps (Jean Renoir, La Grande Illusion); a father-daughter relationship in 1960s Japan (Yasuhiro Ozu, An Autumn Afternoon); and ethnicity in Paris suburbs (Mathieu Kassovitz, La Haine). “Meditations on Landscape” explores the Australian outback (Warwick Thornton, Samson and Delilah); French legionnaires in East Africa (Claire Denis, Beau Travail); and politics and astronomy in Chile’s Atacama desert (Patricio Guzman, Nostalgia for the Light). “Suspense” examines early Alfred Hitchcock (The Man Who Knew Too Much); film noir (Otto Preminger, Laura); and vague uneasiness (Atom Egoyan, Felicia’s Journey). Film theory provides additional avenues for evaluating and enhancing the cinematic experience.‌

The course tuition of $155.00 includes a $5.00 fee from the University so that students can access and stream the movies discussed on their computers.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 25 - April 5, 2017. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Shakespeare's Comedies

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Peter Medine Department of English

This seminar will concentrate on eight of Shakespeare's comedies, among them Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, and The Tempest. The approach will assume that comedy is a genre distinguished not by light-hearted humor or triviality but by structure of plot. The action moves from conflict and separation to resolution and union, and the plays typically end in betrothal or marriage. But whatever its romance, Shakespeare's comedy is serious and psychologically realistic. The plays explore the hazards of human relationships and the perils of commitment. Ultimately it is the comic heroine's deep awareness of herself and the world that make possible the realization of the romantic ideal—if only within the confines of the play. Throughout the seminar analysis of the texts of the plays will be supplemented with video clips of their productions. 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 26 - April 6, 2017. No class on March 16.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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Homer's Odyssey

Professor: 

Professor Bella Vivante Department of Classics

In this course we’ll explore Homer’s brilliant storytelling in The Odyssey: his tales of Odysseus’s struggles to return home after the Trojan War. While the poem highlights the hero’s fantastic adventures, the underlying meanings reflect profound social concerns: female and male identities, and their respective realms and relationships; revisiting The Iliad’s military-centered notions of heroism from social-oriented perspectives; the roles of gods; storytelling traditions, and more. The class looks at how these diverse tales interweave to create Odysseus’s story, his journey, and the challenges he must face to become the worthy husband, father, son, and man of society praised by the poem. Appreciating ancient Greek views on these perennially important themes provides valuable insights into our own ideas about these complex social issues, and why this engaging ancient poem continues to influence our contemporary thinking and creativity

 

 

 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24 - April 4, 2017. No class on March 14.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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What Is Politics?

Professor: 

Professor Emeritus Marvin Waterstone
MIT Professor Emeritus Noam Chomsky

This spring students of all ages will have the exciting opportunity to learn about and discuss politics with one of the greatest public intellectuals of our time, Noam Chomsky. Chomsky and UA emeritus professor Marv Waterstone will coteach a seven-week class titled “What Is Politics?” that is both a general education course for UA undergraduates and a Humanities Seminar class for community members. Connecting students from multiple generations and political outlooks, this course is sure to stimulate ideas, debate, and dialogue.

The course examines industrial state capitalism as the dominant organizing principle of our economy. Throughout the course students will interrogate the consequences of this orientation, including threats to the human species such as climate change, potential nuclear terrorism, and the expansion of militarism and warfare. These consequences also encompass the less spectacular, but nevertheless devastating, effects of globalization and unfettered capitalism on social inequality. At the heart of the class students will explore possible responses and resistances to these phenomena, and will investigate the achievements and difficulties involved with agitating for progressive change.

What You Need to Know

Where:  Environmental and Natural Resources Building 2 (ENR2), Room N120.  This room is a large auditorium.  It is wheelchair accessible and has an assisted listening system.

Parking: The Sixth Street Garage is immediately east of the classroom building.  The garage is on the south side of the campus between Park and Highland Avenues. The hourly charge is $2 before 5 PM and $1 after 5 PM.

Tuesday Class Overview:  The Tuesday lectures will be conducted by Professor Waterstone and will present a theoretical, conceptual, and historical contextualization of the week's topic.

Thursday Class Overview:  Professor Chomsky will use concrete examples (mostly drawn from the news to provide "real life" lenses) to illustrate the concepts articulated on Tuesday, after which there will be a Q & A with Professor Chomsky and a UA faculty expert on that particular topic.

Reading and Syllabus:  Detailed reading assignments and a finalized syllabus will be available closer to the beginning of the course.  The readings for adult students can be accessed online in early January.  Printed material will not be available.

REGISTRATION FOR THIS CLASS ONLY begins on Thursday, November 17, at 8 AM and continues throughout the registration period until the class is full.

 

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

TUESDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. AND THURSDAYS 5:00 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. January 12 - March 2, 2017.
Environmental and Natural Resources Building 2 (ENR2), Room N120

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Has the United States Become an Empire?

Professor: 

Professor David Gibbs Department of History

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on Terror. The course lectures will emphasize the remarkable continuity of U.S. policy from the Cold War through the period after it.

Course Sections: 

Course Full/Registration Closed: 

1

Course Time and Dates: 

FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 29 - April 8, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room

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