Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: David Soren

Join University of Arizona Regents Professor David Soren for a survey of the life and work of four great directors. First up is Fritz Lang whose collaboration with wife Thea Von Harbou led to the recently fully rediscovered science fiction epic Metropolis. Next the enigmatic Busby Berkeley is featured, stressing his importance as a creator of the Hollywood musical look of the 1930s and showing some of his lesser known but still amazing work, including the kaleidoscopic color images of The Gang's All Here, with Alice Faye....

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon July 8, 15, 22, 29, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

The detective tale, born of the work of Edgar Alan Poe and altered by Dashiell Hammett,  evolved over time in the hands of international masters such as Jorge Luis Borges, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán, Andrea Camilleri, and Donna Leon. Our examination helps identify the qualities that provide this genre with its enduring allure, and explores how modern practitioners play with the form and adapt it to the writer’s needs in ways that continue to fuel reader interest. Through the reading of the required primary texts and important recommended...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon June 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

Bleak House is often said to be Dickens’s greatest novel; certainly it is one of his most compelling and enjoyable. We will spend four intense and rewarding weeks reading this masterpiece in its original installments, paying close attention to themes of loss, law, social class, secrecy, and inheritance. We will also explore Dickens’s astonishing use of language by way of close reading. Two critical lenses will guide us: the historical view and a psychological perspective. In addition to what I hope will be a lively discussion of...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Daniel Asia

In four sessions we will look at works of art music from each of the decades of the latter half of the twentieth century. Our focus will be on the act and art of listening, and how to know what to listen for. We will explore the qualities of the music itself and strategies of understanding the music, bringing us deeper satisfaction and appreciation, and thus giving us a stronger relationship to the greatness expressed by the soul and mind of genius. Some works and composers will be familiar to you and some not: Copland, Bernstein, Messiaen...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2014
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Fitch

Forget the rose-in-the-mouth cliché, and discover how tango relates to art, activism, and even therapy. We will analyze films, advertising, theater, poetry, art, documentaries, material culture, digital art forms, and public protests to examine the production, consumption, and diffusion of meaning found in global cultural narratives related to Argentine tango. Students will learn how tango was used to champion women’s rights and modernization in Turkey in the early 20th century, and how Jewish prisoners used it as a symbol of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m. January 30 until April 10, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jerry Hogle

England during the reign of Victoria is famous for industrial, scientific, and technological advances, as well as sexual repression. But it was also an era when the ghost story – and its extensions in longer fictions during one of the heydays of the English novel – flourished in print just as old traditions about the spirit world were being called into question by the many supposed “progresses” of the day. This seminar sets out to explain both the wide range of ghost stories during the time before and after Charles Dickens’ “A...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 27 until April 7, 2014 (no class on March 17 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

In this cultural excursion we will explore literary and artistic highlights of the diverse cultures that have flourished in the concise landmass of ancient Anatolia (modern Turkey) —Paleolithic and Neolithic habitation, Hittites, Amazons, Assyrians, Hebrew Biblical, Troy, Phrygia, Lydia, Lycia, Ionian Greeks, Roman, early Christian, Byzantine, Ottoman. Textbooks provide historical background; and art, architecture, poetry, philosophy, and other writings offer insights into the distinctive qualities that make these cultures memorable and...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 24 until April 4, 2014 (no class on March 21)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: George Davis, Peter Kresan

The Colorado Plateau is a sublime geologic province renowned for its breathtaking rock formations and landscapes. During our exploration of the Colorado Plateau, we will descend the Grand Canyon, ascend the Grand Staircase, cross the Escalante, explore Canyonlands, experience the Four Corners, absorb the Painted Desert, and ultimately complete our journey on the San Francisco Peaks. Panoramic and aerial images will aid in storytelling and help frame points of primary emphasis. Along the way we will sample some of the art, poetry, and...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. January 23 until March 27, 2014 (no class on March 20 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Alain-Philippe Durand

What makes the French laugh? Why do the French like Jerry Lewis (and other comedians such as Charles Chaplin) so much?  Why does Hollywood remake so many French comedies? This interactive seminar responds to these questions by examining the comic and humor techniques used in French cinema throughout the years. In addition to watching and analyzing several representative films from different periods, participants will study the cultural and historic roots of French humor and laughter throughout history. Representative films (with English...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAY 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. January 22 until April 23, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break). Optional screenings of movies in the Rubel room on February 12, 19, and March 5.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steven D. Martinson

The youthful interests of Friedrich Nietzsche permeate his later work, for which the critical-creative writer is most widely known. We will first consider his early experiences, memories, illustrations, piano compositions, poetry, and prose, including his first major published writing, The Birth of Tragedy out of the Spirit of Music, and university lectures on the pre-Socratics. The goal is to render a new and different reading that challenges contemporary perceptions, images, and conceptions of one of the most influential and...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. January 22 until April 2, 2014 (no class on March 19 due to UA spring break)
Dorothy Rubel Room

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