Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Malcolm Compitello

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes has undoubtedly profoundly influenced the techniques, form, and meaning of modern art. From his innovations that revolutionized making etchings to the form and content of his historical and allegorical painting, Goya’s influence on artistic creation is immense. This course will study that influence and examine how Goya’s view of the world and his thought emerged. We will see how his paintings and etchings evolved into a systematic criticism of the antiquated nature of Spain’s institutions and way of life. We...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS June 29 - July 27, 2016 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Laura C. Berry

Sherlock Holmes never actually said “Elementary, my dear Watson!” There have been more than 60 Holmes films, including one in which he is portrayed by a mouse, one by a dog, and at least one as a woman. Arthur Conan Doyle, the original author, was a medical doctor, a freemason, and a believer in spiritualism and clairvoyance. These and other curious facts will be explored (or should we say “detected“?) in this seminar, as we examine a cross-section of the many adaptations of Doyle’s iconic detective. We will begin by reading many of the...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. June 7 - June 28, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Eleni Hasaki

What were the key technologies and major technical achievements of classical Greek antiquity? This course examines two crucial and interconnected industries: ceramics and bronze-working. The two crafts are often discussed separately, but in this course we will focus on their deeply rooted connections. We will examine the qualities of the raw materials used, the technological know-how of potters and bronze-smiths, the pyrotechnological principles of their kilns and furnaces, as well as the social, political, economic, and cultural milieus...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. June 1- June 22, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Melissa Tatum

The Civil War was not only pivotal moment in American history, it was a key moment in the development of American music. Even as the war was ripping the country in half, the military was bringing together soldiers from differing ethnic and musical backgrounds. The resulting comingling of instruments, songs, and styles has been called the first recognizably “American” folk music.

This is not a history class or a music class, but rather is an examination of the connection between music, history, and place. It is a class about how a...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 5 - May 26, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Byrne

While many people living in Tucson and its surroundings are experienced outdoor aficionados, many lack an understanding of our near neighbors--those plants and animals that live close to us in our urban environment. Certainly we can choose to ignore the flora and fauna of our desert community and function reasonably well. Our lives are enriched, however, if we take the time to develop a better understanding of our companion species. Developing this awareness/knowledge ?is the goal of this course. Using ecology, the scientific analysis and...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. May 3- May 31, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Monica J. Casper

Superman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, Batman, Captain America, Green Lantern, Iron Man, Black Widow--the list of America’s superheroes is long. Comic books, TV, and cinema have long built up the appeal of superheroes, and they remain popular. Embodiments of cultural meanings, social practices, and political imaginaries, superheroes tell us stories about ourselves. Historically, representations of superheroes have been connected to national security and the Cold War, changing gender roles, racial stereotypes, and environmental issues. In this...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. March 1 - April 5, 2016. No class on March 15.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: George Davis, Peter Kresan

The Colorado Plateau is a vibrant tectonic province renowned for its landscapes, geology, and beauty. It is in effect a living, dynamic museum of natural history, with its 3D “displays” covering nearly two billion years of history. Through lectures, photography, and choice rock and fossil specimens we will “see” the sedimentary strata as records of ancient landscapes and seascapes, and “read” earth deformation and volcanism as expressions of plate tectonics in action. Moreover, we will come to know this raw, exposed canyon country as an...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. February 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Irene Bald Romano

Art has often been plundered or stolen during times of war, occupation, or even peace. This course explores the historical, political, and legal framework of specific moments when art has been taken. The class focuses on how art has been used for propagandistic purposes, as pawns in high-stakes politics, or as a “cash cow” in the legitimate or black market. It also looks at ethical issues of museum collecting, the debate over cultural property, and the dilemma of recovery or repatriation of stolen art. Case studies include the looting of...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. February 1 - 29, 2016.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Gibbs

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 29 - April 8, 2016
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

This course encompasses Romeo and Juliet, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus, and King Lear. While addressing ourselves to such matters as language and theatricality, we shall approach plays primarily from the perspectives of plot and characterization. This line of inquiry will enable us to focus on the psychology and morality of the tragic protagonists and at the same time take into account the shape of the plays' action. Thereby we shall be able to move beyond the misguided...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 28 - April 7, 2016. No class on March 17.
Dorothy Rubel Room

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