Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Richard T. Hanson

Gene Kelly once said that “the history of dance on film begins with Astaire.” One might say that the history of dance on film ends with Kelly. Dancin’ Fools will explore the Broadway and Hollywood careers of these two iconic song and dance men who define the Golden Age of movie musicals. Astaire’s elegance and Kelly’s athleticism transformed dance in popular culture and elevated it to the status of art. Astaire in his top hat and tails and Kelly in his white socks and loafers were a counter point to each other, enchanting audiences...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS morning section: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. afternoon section: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Paul Ivey

This course examines the fundamental issues and theories surrounding the art production and reception of Modern Art in Europe and America through the twentieth century. Framed by discussions of Post-Impressionist painting of the 1880s and the Post-Modern pluralist art of the 1980s, we will examine how theories of human nature, art, and spirituality informed the creation and interpretation of painting, sculpture, architecture and mixed-media works in their specific cultural, social and political arenas. This class will trace two major...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

After 2500 years, Ancient Greek Drama still fascinates modern audiences. In this course students will explore the interactions between the ancient and modern. By reading ancient Greek plays or poems and reading or viewing a modern play or film based on the ancient, students will discuss the themes and ideas prevalent in the ancient, how these are treated in the modern versions, and why these ancient themes still appeal to dramatists, cinematographers and their audiences. The modern versions are selected for the thought-provoking...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jonathan Overpeck

This course will give students an understanding of how the Earth’s climate changes naturally, as well as how humans are driving this change. We will explore what is likely to happen in the future, resulting both from natural change and change driven by the human-caused rise of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and other influences. We’ll cover the physical climate system, how it interacts with water, landscapes and ecosystems, and what the options are for dealing with the change, both in terms of adaptation and reducing...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jerry Hogle

"Gothic" literature, theater, and (more recently) films have been a part of Western culture for over 250 years and have presented us, in disguise, with heightened -- and sometimes lurid and monstrous -- symbols of what really haunts us as a culture in our individual, social, and cultural sub-conscious.

This course will look at how the Gothic began as a literary form in the 1760's, how and why it has changed as a mode of fiction over time, and the ways in which it draws out repressed levels of belief and feeling in our culture. By the...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October, 6, 13, 20, 27, November 3, 10, 17, December 1, 8, 15, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Scott Lucas

This course explores the beliefs and cultures of Islam and the Muslim world. It covers the life and teachings of Muhammad, major themes of the Qur’an, and the primary differences between Sunni and Shi’i Muslims. It also introduces aspects of Muslim cultures in the Middle East and South Asia in order to demonstrate the plurality of traditions within the religion of Islam. It concludes with a review of American foreign policy in the Muslim world over the past half century and its impact on Muslim-American relations.

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS from 10 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Mike Lippman

This course tracks the downward spiral of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire, starting from around 146 BC when Rome first firmly established herself as the world power and continuing through the Battle of Actium of 31 BC, where Octavian established his sole reign as ruler of the Mediterranean.

The main focus will be on primary ancient texts. We will read contemporary authors like Cicero (his orations and his personal letters), the historian Sallust and the campaign accounts of Julius Caesar. We will also read the...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: John Wilson

 With an eye to the esthetic qualities of the human body in motion, this course surveys diverse forms of dance in many cultures of the world in order to deepen our appreciation of the spiritual, emotional, and intellectual dimensions of this universal mode of expression. We begin with studying how and why the human body is uniquely designed for dancing. We continue with the study of rhythm as a psycho-kinesthetic phenomenon and observe how dance, song, and poetry arise in the same experience. We then trace the evolution of dance forms from...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 noon on: October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

Travels in Consciousness, taught by Norman Austin, Professor Emeritus of the Department of Classics,  will explore the history of consciousness as reflected in a variety of texts. Readings will range widely, from Bronze Age Greece to American authors of the Twentieth Century.  By “consciousness” is meant the ways in which individuals conceive of themselves and their world; it has to do not only with thought but also with feeling, volition, and behavior. So regarded consciousness constitutes individual identity and defines the human...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. on: September 30, October 7, 14, 21, 28, November 4, 18, December 2, 9, 16, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room

Pages