Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Homer Pettey

Clearly, Nobel laureates have made major creative contributions to world literature and to international reception of emerging nations’ literary arts.   This course will expose students to movements in 20th-century world literature by reading Nobel laureates. Global modernism, as shown by influences shared among these laureates, combines Western and non-Western styles, traditions, and modes of expression.  This class will emphasize the relationship of modern world literature to traditional arts, performance, and ritual.

Formal...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 5, 12, 19, 26, November 2, 9, 16, 30, December 7, 14, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Byrne

Because insects account for more than half of all described species and have profound effects on our history and culture, knowledge of their contributions and influences is important. Ecologically, insects provide tremendous benefits and equally daunting challenges. They provide critical biological services in pollination, natural products, pest-population regulation, and human nutrition. Insects are also our chief competitors for food, and act as parasites and vectors of human disease, the source of much human misery. The impacts of...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 a.m. until noon October 4, 11, 18, 25, November 1, 8, 15, 29, December 6, 13, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Cynthia White

Rome survives despite nearly 3,000 years of invasions by Sabines, Gauls, Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Huns, Normans, Napoleon, Hitler, and mass tourism.  In this course we will visit Rome, interwoven in texts and art, from antiquity through the twentieth century. We will complement our reading selections from diaries, guidebooks, poetry, fiction, and history with film clips and discussion.

Beginning with its foundation on the Palatine Hill and continuing through the design of Mussolini’s Fascist Square, we will reflect on “the city that...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, November 7, 14, 28, December 5, 12, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Malcolm Compitello

The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) or "The Good Fight," as was it was commonly called on the left, was democracy's first major confrontation with fascism. Its indelible mark on Spain and on the international community is still felt today.  This course will look at the war, its impact and rich international intellectual legacy. The examination of the war will begin with a consideration of it from the Spanish perspective, uncovering the deep tensions in Spanish society and politics that led up to the armed conflict. From there our analysis...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 until noon October 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, November 6, 13, 27, December 4, 11, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Thomas P. Miller

Alexander Hamilton promised that the Constitution would “unite parties for the general welfare,” but Washington perceived that “the baneful effects of the spirit of Party” continued to threaten the republic.  In the centuries since, we have blamed partisans and identified with parties.   Both of our major parties are grab bags of discordant factions, as we will discuss with an eye to how politicians appeal to common aspirations and contradictory assumptions.   As part of our discussions, we will look at the historical evolution of party...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard Poss

This seminar will examine mysterious moments, ancient and modern, which have come to the fore in humanity’s quest to understand our place in the cosmos.
 
We begin in prehistory, where from the oldest humans we have evidence of sophisticated astronomy.   How much did the earliest sky-watchers discover the motions of the heavens?  What did they record in stone for us to decipher?  We will study archaeoastronomical monuments in Europe and America to try to place ourselves in the minds of the earliest astronomers.  From there we...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until noon October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, November 5, 26, December 3, 10, 17, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

Using the recent translation by Jean and Robert Hollander, we will deal with Dante’s views on human nature as represented in his Purgatorio.  We shall discuss the nature of sin: how it is that appetites which keep the body and species alive are evil (i.e., lust and gluttony); and how it is that human beings can transcend their fallen nature (with Divine assistance).  We will cover the numerous historical personages and references therein, and the theology implicit to it.
Although Purgatorio is the second portion of Dante’s Comedy, it...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. July 10, 17, 24, 31, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

Two years ago the Main Library of the University of Arizona was given a massive donation of original collections from the American Vaudeville Museum by its curators Frank Cullen and Donald McNeilly. This collection is one of the largest in the world. To commemorate this move, Dr. David Soren who coordinated the transfer will offer a course in the history and evolution of American vaudeville from its roots to superstars such as Al Jolson, Sophie Tucker, The Nicholas Brothers, Annette Kellerman, Eddie Cantor and many more.

Dr. Soren...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. July 9, 16, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

The Odyssey gives us an adventure story of a Greek hero returning to his home in Ithaca after the Trojan War.  This could be a straightforward journey lasting three or four days at most.  But in the Odyssey the journey is expanded into a narrative of 24 books (= ancient rolls) and over a time period of ten years.  Home-coming is made into an epic theme.   The epic dimensions of this journey allow the poets to incorporate a variety of folktales of heroic encounters with nymphs of divine beauty and monsters such as only an epic hero could...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. June 6, 13, 20, 27, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Meg Lota Brown

How do Shakespeare and filmmakers who adapt his plays engage their audiences, construct meaning, and enable us to understand more fully our own culture and ourselves? This seminar will deepen our understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s drama and of his cinematic interpreters.  We will focus on the following plays from three different genres—comedy, tragedy, and history: Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part I, Henry IV, Part II, and Henry V. Each of those plays will be paired with at least two film adaptations from...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room

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