Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Meg Lota Brown

How do Shakespeare and filmmakers who adapt his plays engage their audiences, construct meaning, and enable us to understand more fully our own culture and ourselves? This seminar will deepen our understanding and appreciation of Shakespeare’s drama and of his cinematic interpreters.  We will focus on the following plays from three different genres—comedy, tragedy, and history: Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Henry IV Part I, Henry IV, Part II, and Henry V. Each of those plays will be paired with at least two film adaptations from...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Barbara Atwood

When Oliver Wendell Holmes declared that “the life of the law has not been logic; it has been experience,” he meant that law is a messy and imperfect invention reflecting the human condition.  This course will explore the imperfect nature of law today by focusing on cutting edge contemporary problems in legal interpretation and policy, with each covered by a distinguished faculty member from the College of Law, who is a well-known expert in the field.  Four distinguished faculty members from the College of Law will lecture on an area within...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 p.m. May 1, 8, 15, 22, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

Franz Liszt (1811–1886) is one of the seminal figures of the 19th century. As one of the great piano virtuosos, he toured Europe from one end to the other, coming into contact with virtually all the prominent figures of the period. As a composer, he contributed to all the major genres and pioneered various innovations in form and harmony.
 
A series of four class sessions will consider Liszt, both in terms of biography and music. For the latter, our survey will begin with piano music (the first session), continue with...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. January 30, February 6, 13, 20, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Adele Barker

This course is for those who love to read ! Beginning with his memoir Childhood, Boyhood, and Youth and then moving into War and Peace, we will discuss the world that the great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy created in his fictions against the backdrop of the social and political ferment that would ultimately lead to the 1917 revolution. Tolstoy attempted to find the family happiness in his novels that eluded him in his own life. Reading him is to gain insight into the unique role that literature played in political and...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. January 26, February 2, 9, 16, 23, March 1, 8, 22, 29, April 5, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

I have put in [Ulysses] so many enigmas and  puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries arguing over what I meant.  James Joyce
                                                                                                                           
While most of the great avant-garde art works of the early 20thcentury rest securely within the canon of modernist classics, Ulysses (1922) continues to challenge and, as the author had hoped, puzzle us. We are still struggling to become Joyce’s...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Patrick Baliani

What makes comedy comedy? Does the comedic aesthetic evolve across cultural and temporal barriers? How do interpretation and performance affect our understanding of the works? What does it mean that "comedy is deadly serious"? These are a few of the questions to be raised in the exploration of one major comedy each week, by Aristophanes, Plautus, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Wilde, Shaw, Coward, and Frayn. Historical, social,
political, and psychological contexts will also be addressed. Professional actors will perform key...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 25, February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, March 7, 21, 28, April 4, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Richard T. Hanson

Gene Kelly once said that “the history of dance on film begins with Astaire.” One might say that the history of dance on film ends with Kelly. Dancin’ Fools will explore the Broadway and Hollywood careers of these two iconic song and dance men who define the Golden Age of movie musicals. Astaire’s elegance and Kelly’s athleticism transformed dance in popular culture and elevated it to the status of art. Astaire in his top hat and tails and Kelly in his white socks and loafers were a counter point to each other, enchanting audiences...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS morning section: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. afternoon section: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. January 24, 31, February 7, 14, 21, 28, March 6, 20, 27, April 3, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Paul Ivey

This course examines the fundamental issues and theories surrounding the art production and reception of Modern Art in Europe and America through the twentieth century. Framed by discussions of Post-Impressionist painting of the 1880s and the Post-Modern pluralist art of the 1980s, we will examine how theories of human nature, art, and spirituality informed the creation and interpretation of painting, sculpture, architecture and mixed-media works in their specific cultural, social and political arenas. This class will trace two major...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 23, 30, February 6, 13, 20, 27, March 5, 19, 26, April 2, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Bella Vivante

After 2500 years, Ancient Greek Drama still fascinates modern audiences. In this course students will explore the interactions between the ancient and modern. By reading ancient Greek plays or poems and reading or viewing a modern play or film based on the ancient, students will discuss the themes and ideas prevalent in the ancient, how these are treated in the modern versions, and why these ancient themes still appeal to dramatists, cinematographers and their audiences. The modern versions are selected for the thought-provoking...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. January 20, 27, February 3, 10, 17, 24, March 2, 9, 23, 30, 2012
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jonathan Overpeck

This course will give students an understanding of how the Earth’s climate changes naturally, as well as how humans are driving this change. We will explore what is likely to happen in the future, resulting both from natural change and change driven by the human-caused rise of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and other influences. We’ll cover the physical climate system, how it interacts with water, landscapes and ecosystems, and what the options are for dealing with the change, both in terms of adaptation and reducing...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. October 19, 26, November 2, 9, 2011
Dorothy Rubel Room

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