Past Courses

To view course videos click on the title of the past course.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor: Celestino Fernandez

Since the formation of the current U.S.-Mexico border resulting from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, immigration (both legal and unauthorized) across this border has been a hotly debated political issue. That debate continues today as seen in the rhetoric of last year’s presidential election and the various issues pertaining to the border, including “The Wall,” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and immigration. This seminar will explore various immigration issues across the U.S.-Mexico border through...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Jay Rosenblatt

This course surveys the music of Ludwig van Beethoven from the perspectives of different professors at the Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt begins with an overview of Beethoven’s life: his youth in Bonn, the reasons for his move to Vienna, and the outline of his early, middle, and late style periods. He will also introduce the stylistic characteristics of Beethoven’s music. Subsequent sessions will be led by Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, who will consider Beethoven’s sacred music, particularly the Missa Solemnis...

Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 16 - November 13, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Fabian Alfie

ATTEND THIS COURSE IN OUR NEW ORO VALLEY LOCATION

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Dante’s 700-year-old masterpiece the Divine Comedy still attracts great attention. For centuries readers have been drawn to his vivid description of the afterlife. This course will explore the first portion of the Divine ComedyInferno, in its entirety. The class will focus on the organization...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. October 12 - November 2, 2017.
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Bryan Carter

In the 1920s and 1930s the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. From just after World War I until just after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music, and literature was celebrated in cities such as Harlem, Chicago, Washington, New...

Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 11 - November 8, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Peter Medine

ATTEND THE INAUGURAL COURSE IN ORO VALLEY

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 pm August 4 - September 1, 2017
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr
Professor: Susan A. Crane

This course examines modern histories of collective memories through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography, and visual culture. We will consider moments of tension when history and memory appear to be at odds, when competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict, or when silences about the past are broken. Case studies may include: the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian in 1995; appeals for apologies for past atrocities, such as slavery, human trafficking, or...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm August 1 - August 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: David Soren

The University of Arizona has one of America's greatest holdings in the field of vaudeville. Special Collections Guest Curator David Soren presents some of the best stars and specialty acts you've never heard of along with fascinating and little-known information about some of the biggest stars. Featured are vaudeville's most versatile performer Joe Cook, whose sidekick, pantomime comic Dave Chasen, founded Chasen's Restaurant (open 1936-1995) in West Hollywood. Learn about the dark side of Al Jolson, and witness one of his performances...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 9:00 am to 11:00 am July 6 - July 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Norman Austin

Virgil, the greatest Roman poet, did more to establish the idea of Rome (and hence of the Roman Empire) than any other ancient poet. As a young man he began his poetic career writing pastoral poems, which are called Eclogues. This seminar will study the political pressures in the final days of the Roman Republic that led Virgil to invent a new genre of poetry. He borrowed the idea of the pastoral from the Hellenistic Greek poets, but made a new genre of poetry uniquely his own. Concentrating on a selection from Virgil’s ...

Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 30 - July 28, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Steve Smith

Environments commonly known as “deserts” occupy nearly one-third of the earth’s land surface and are home to about a billion people. We will first discuss the geographical features of deserts, answering seemingly simple questions: What is a desert, and why do they occur where they do? Humans are particularly maladapted to life in deserts, but many organisms exhibit remarkable adaptations to aridity. We will investigate examples of these within plants from different deserts. Here the key questions will be: How do these plants grow and...

Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 9:00 am - 12:00 pm June 6 - June 27, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Professor: Tannis Gibson

What inspired Romantic composers of the 19th century to create the significant piano works that continue to speak profoundly to today’s audiences? Throughout the Romantic era the piano and the pianist-composers who wrote for it assumed an increasingly important role in European society. These pianist-composers and virtuosi fully explored the inner depths of their imaginations, and it is perhaps in the solo piano repertoire most of all that we as listeners become privy to their most passionate and idiosyncratic work. In this...

Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 1 - June 29, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

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