Past Courses

To see all courses currently available scroll to the bottom of this page.

Looking for our really old courses (going back to the founding of the HSP program)? You can find them in our Course Archive.

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 11 - November 8, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

In the 1920s and 1930s the soulful rhythms of blues and jazz signaled an explosion of African American creativity. During this period, known as the New Negro Movement and later as the Harlem Renaissance, musicians, dancers, visual artists, writers, and scholars sought to define their African heritage in American culture. From just after World War I until just after the stock market crash in 1929, the vibrancy of the newly discovered African American art, music, and literature was celebrated in cities such as Harlem, Chicago, Washington, New York, and even as far away as Paris. In this course we will explore the Harlem Renaissance, which is considered the first important movement of black artists and writers in the United States. 

 

Tuition:
$95
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 24 - November 14, 2017.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

Since the formation of the current U.S.-Mexico border resulting from the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and the Gadsden Purchase, immigration (both legal and unauthorized) across this border has been a hotly debated political issue. That debate continues today as seen in the rhetoric of last year’s presidential election and the various issues pertaining to the border, including “The Wall,” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), and immigration. This seminar will explore various immigration issues across the U.S.-Mexico border through historical, humanistic, and sociological lenses. It focuses on the human drama that has played out, and continues to do so today, as people from Latin America attempt to cross the U.S.-Mexico border, the most frequently crossed in the world. Some of the questions addressed include: What is the border? Who crosses it? Why do they cross? Can the issue of immigration be resolved?

Professor
Tuition:
$105
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm June 30 - July 28, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

Virgil, the greatest Roman poet, did more to establish the idea of Rome (and hence of the Roman Empire) than any other ancient poet. As a young man he began his poetic career writing pastoral poems, which are called Eclogues. This seminar will study the political pressures in the final days of the Roman Republic that led Virgil to invent a new genre of poetry. He borrowed the idea of the pastoral from the Hellenistic Greek poets, but made a new genre of poetry uniquely his own. Concentrating on a selection from Virgil’s Eclogues, this seminar will trace both the influence of the Greek tradition and Virgil’s own influence in creating a style and a genre of pastoral poetry that was to have immense significance in subsequent European poetry.

 

Required Reading:

Virgil. The Eclogues of Virgil: A Bilingual Edition. Trans. David Ferry. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. ISBN-10: 0374526966; ISBN-13: 978-0374526962.

Theocritus. Idylls. Trans. Anthony Verity. Oxford University Press, 2008. ISBN-10: 0199552428; ISBN-13: 978-0199552429.

Professor
Tuition:
$150
Course Time and Dates:
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 10:00 am - 12:00 pm August 1 - August 31, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room

This course examines modern histories of collective memories through the institutions and technologies that facilitate recall, such as museums, photography, and visual culture. We will consider moments of tension when history and memory appear to be at odds, when competing interests in the meanings of the past have created social conflict, or when silences about the past are broken. Case studies may include: the Enola Gay exhibit at the Smithsonian in 1995; appeals for apologies for past atrocities, such as slavery, human trafficking, or genocide; or lynching photographs in the “Without Sanctuary” exhibit of 2002. While the course emphasizes how societies come to terms with painful or shameful memories, we will also focus on the ways in which visual sources, particularly photographs, have shaped discourses of memory. By learning from scratch how to “read” historical photographs, we will interrogate the ways in which iconic images, snapshots, and “Kodak moments” have become integral to thinking about collective memory.

Professor
Tuition:
$135
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 pm August 4 - September 1, 2017
Oro Valley Council Chamber | 11000 N La Cañada Dr

ATTEND THE INAUGURAL COURSE IN ORO VALLEY

LOCATION: TOWN OF ORO VALLEY COUNCIL CHAMBER | 11000 N La Cañada Dr | Parking Is Free

Jane Austen's portrayals of Regency England's provincial life provide fascinating commentary on social and economic issues as well as the characters' psychology and emotional lives. Throughout this class we will attend to the ironic presentation, where the narrative's implicit meaning often differs from what is literally expressed.  Such approaches will bring into focus the education of the main characters through the trials of their experiences. While the novels conform to the comedic mode, in which the principals ultimately realize their destinies as well-married men and women, their education displays the hazards, if not the flaws, of society and humanity. These are some of the ways in which Austen reworks the Bildungsroman formula to create narratives of poise, wit, and artistic seriousness. It is little wonder that Austen has long been regarded as the originator of the “great tradition” of the English novel.

Required Reading:

 

Jane Austen. Emma. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1998. ISBN-10: 0486406482.  ISBN-13: 978-0486406480.

__________. Pride and Prejudice. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1995. ISBN-10:  0486284735. ISBN-13: 978-0486284736.

____________. Sense and Sensibility. Dover Thrift Edition. Dover Publications, 1995. ISBN-10: 0486290492.  ISBN-13: 978-0486290492.

All three texts are paperback editions. 

 

 

Professor
Tuition:
$115
Course Time and Dates:
MONDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 16 - November 13, 2017
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This course surveys the music of Ludwig van Beethoven from the perspectives of different professors at the Fred Fox School of Music. Jay Rosenblatt begins with an overview of Beethoven’s life: his youth in Bonn, the reasons for his move to Vienna, and the outline of his early, middle, and late style periods. He will also introduce the stylistic characteristics of Beethoven’s music. Subsequent sessions will be led by Bruce Chamberlain, Director of Choral Activities, who will consider Beethoven’s sacred music, particularly the Missa Solemnis; Thomas Cockrell, Director of Orchestral Activities, who will discuss Beethoven’s symphonies; John Milbauer, Professor of Piano, who will focus on Beethoven’s late piano work; and Tim Kantor, Assistant Professor of Violin, who will examine Beethoven’s chamber music from the perspective of a professional string quartet member.

Professor
Tuition:
$205
Course Time and Dates:
WEDNESDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. October 4 - December 13, 2017. No class on November 22.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

This seminar focuses on the six poets (one recently rediscovered) who most defined  English Romanticism in poetry and verse drama between 1798 and 1824. It emphasizes their philosophical, emotional, and stylistic tugs-of-war, despite their quite different politics: first, between proposals for revolutions in social organization and how individuals relate to the wider world (they all knew the American and French revolutions of the 1770s-90s), and second, retrogressive longings for earlier orders of being and poetic styles whose revivals promised a better world than the emerging one of rapid social changes and aggressive industrialism. Each class examines their most progressive and simultaneously regressive tendencies, the special paradoxes that still make these poets so revealing about the post-Enlightenment dawning of the modern world. The six poets are: Wordsworth, Coleridge, Mary Robinson, Byron, Keats, and Shelley.

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. October 5 - December 14, 2017. No class on November 23.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

Biology has well-supported insights into how animals make decisions and why they behave the way they do, in contexts from foraging to cooperation. This knowledge is grounded in theory as well as empirical evidence. Generally these insights also apply to humans: humans evolved, and thus their brain as well as their preferences, capabilities, and learning abilities are all the result of natural selection, as they are for any other animal. What consequences does this have for our understanding of how people behave when shopping, budgeting time, parenting, loving, or hating? In this course, we will cover how biologists arrived at their conclusions about animals and discuss how they apply to humans. We will also talk about psychological research and controversies in this area, and what, if anything, differentiates humans from other animals (intelligence, cultural evolution, free will?). Do any of these research findings change our conclusions? 

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
THURSDAYS 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m October 5 - December 14, 2017. No class on November 23.
Location TBD
Future Course

This course explores Islam and Muslim societies in the contemporary period. It begins by focusing on the fundamentals of Islam, such as the life of Muhammad, the Qur’an, law, and theology. The topics we will discuss include opportunities for Muslims in the United States, Islamic spirituality (including Sufism), and successful Muslim-majority countries, such as Indonesia. The primary challenges we will address include political authoritarianism, sectarianism, and religious extremism. The objective of this seminar is to provide accurate information about the religion of Islam and to demystify Muslim cultures that frequently are portrayed in the media as violent and irrationally hostile to the West. Seminarians are encouraged to bring their questions regarding Islam and Muslims to this class.

 

Professor
Tuition:
$160
Course Time and Dates:
FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. September 15 - December 15, 2017. No classes on October 6, October 20, November 10, and November 24.
Dorothy Rubel Room
Future Course

U.S. intervention in underdeveloped countries raises many basic issues of international relations and foreign policy. The main purpose of this class is to provide students with an ability to examine such issues critically and in a historical context. Among the general areas we will look at are: the historical background that led to the emergence of the USA as a major power, beginning at the end of the 1940s; the role of covert operations during the Cold War; the Vietnam War and its long-term effects; the end of the Cold War; and the War on Terror. The course lectures will emphasize the remarkable continuity of U.S. policy from the Cold War through the period after it.

This course is a repeat of the class given in Spring 2016.

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